god-exists

  • person who has never experienced sexism in any way:lol gender inequality is a myth
Just completed my essay on God and science. Just wrote 10 pages for philosophy as to why Science and God definitely can co exist.

I’m actually laughing because I used the phrase

"… in the end people should go about their lives without trying to stop groups from practicing religion. My faith shouldn’t bother you as long as I’m staying in my lane and you are staying in yours"

My philosophy teacher is a white republican so let’s see if he docks me points for using AAVE.

The most beautiful kind of love is the selfless kind. The kind that’s already full, so it isn’t needy or demanding. The kind that isn’t poor. But already rich, and therefore generous. This kind of love can never exist outside God, because God is the Source of that fill. He enriches the beggers, that they may give, rather than demand. Love. Rather than need.
The most beautiful kind of love is the selfless kind. The kind that’s already full, so it isn’t needy or demanding. The kind that isn’t poor. But already rich, and therefore generous. This kind of love can never exist outside God, because God is the Source of that fill. He enriches the beggars, that they may give, rather than demand. Love. Rather than need.
—  Yasmin Mogahed

anonymous asked:

Wait you practice roman traditions and stuff? I know there's a small number of people that do, but I don't understand the point entirely, even though I have paintings of eros and psyche and Apollo in my room, kind of like a loose alter but not really if that makes sense i don't know I'm 17 and really curious about celebrating this.

I am not a strict Reconstructionist, but yes, I try to keep their festivals. The point? Well, I think everyone has a different reason for keeping the traditions. There are those who are interested in and recreate ancient cultures, those who like mythology, those who work with the gods as symbols and archetypes, and those who believe the gods actually exist. In short, there’s room at the banquet for many different perspectives. And, depending where you live, there might be a good-sized crowd celebrating! You’re welcome to join in, dear Anon - though I recommend you substitute grape juice for wine, until you are of legal drinking age in your jurisdiction.


Anthesteria was one of the four annual Athenian festivals in honor of Dionysus. On the first day, Pithoigia (which was yesterday), dwellings were decorated with flowers. New vessels of wine were opened, and everyone - including children, slaves, and the spirits of the dead - celebrated and made offerings to Dionysus. The second day, Choes (today), was dedicated to drinking and merriment. It was also the day of a solemn ritual in which the basilissa (a ceremonial Queen) was wed to Dionysus. This was a secret ceremony, so no one knows exactly what it entailed, but some scholars believe it was a reenactment of the marriage of Ariadne to Dionysus. On the third day, Chytroi (which is tomorrow), offerings were made to the souls of the dead, who were then bidden to depart.


You can read more about the Reconstructionist celebration of Anthesteria at: http://www.hellenicgods.org/anthaestiria and http://societasviaromana.net/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1032


Io, Bacchus! Hail,Dionysus!

Q: We are stuck in a movie phase where our heroes are accidental heroes, or heroes by destiny and not through any quality they possess.

del Toro: [Pacific Rim] is old fashioned.

Q: This is definitely old fashioned. Can you talk about that, the kind of heroism you wanted to have in this movie?

del Toro: I really wanted it to be a very complicated movie that played very simple. I wanted to make an adventure movie where the sentiments of the characters are there, but they’re not the main obstacle to overcome. I told Charlie Hunnam when he came on, ‘I know actors like complex characters, but Raleigh has very few moving parts.’ He’s really a guy who wants to do good, he’s just afraid to trust someone else and have them die on him because he’ll feel it, like he did when his brother went. You better put spoilers here! But I said, that’s him. When he finds somebody he trusts he’s ready to be good. He’s not Hamlet, wondering if he can do it. I said to Rinko, ‘The two characters need to trust each other.’ You literally see Rinko lose her heart when she’s a child - she has a red object - and then the blue memory stains her hair. She’s carrying it with her. Then when they come together they become one inside the robot.

It’s a simple, earnest heroism. It’s not jingoistic, it’s not ideological, it’s purely humanistic. It’s about the world saving the world. I really needed characters who have good cores. Even the asshole in the movie, the guy you’re meant to hate, he’s a good guy.

—  Badass Interview: Guillermo del Toro gets Spoilery on Pacific Rim (x)