god i love this quote so much

Oh my God this shit has so much good quote potential my dudes

“Have you never done something horrible with the sole intention to protect?” Viktor asks of Yuuri, desperately, as he tries to convince Yuuri to stay after running out of their wedding.

“I believe that horribleness for protection’s sake blurs the line of what one must be protected from,” Yuuri snaps. “I have never lied to you, sir, and I was under the impression that the condition was mutual. Forgive me for my dismay at being proven wrong.”

and 

“Shall I tell you of my love, Yuuri? He who holds my heart? Shall I speak to you of the soul to which mine cries in the dark?”

“I have encountered Mister Giacometti many times, sir.” Yuuri speaks mostly to his own feet. “He is a winsome man of great character. I believe your union will be a successful and happy one, should you choose to take him as your spouse.”

“Do you honestly believe it is Christophe to whom I refer?” Mr. Nikiforov has taken on that look of bafflement again.

“Who else sir?” Yuuri murmurs, before walking away.

and

“Why do you waste your time at the window, child?” Ms. Baranovskaya looks up from her needle point. “Do none of the books interest you? You are the child’s tutor, do you not take time in the day to enrich yourself?”

“You’re right, of course.” Yuuri steps down from the window, straightening himself. “I apologize, Ms. Baranovskaya.”

“It was not meant as criticism,” Ms. Baranovskaya says after a moment. “At least not entirely. What holds your interest in those woods?”

Yuuri flicks his gaze towards the window once more. “Not the woods, ma’am, but what lies beyond. I wonder what is out there. I am twenty-three, ma’am, and educated. I traveled over the sea when I was only an infant, but since arriving in this country my life has seen little excitement. I receive letters from my former school-mate, who has returned to his birthplace of Bangkok in an attempt to gain riches. The tales he recalls to me are…not to be believed. In contrast, I have never seen a city. Indeed, I have not even returned to my family home in five years. I believe it may be shame that holds me back. The shame that I have not improved myself, despite the sacrifices of my family. I am twenty-three, and yet my ten-year-old pupil has more worldliness. My own inadequacies shame me.”

Ms. Baranovskaya is terribly quiet for only a moment–a moment during which Yuuri dismounts the window seat and crosses to the bookshelf.

“Shame can only take root if it is nurtured, Yuuri Katsuki,” she says finally. “It is very similar, in that way, to fear. But also love. Perhaps you should stop coddling your shame.”

Cas finds tumblr
  • Cas: Dean there's this interesting website called tumblr
  • Dean: Cas, stay away from there
  • Cas: *confused head tilt* What is Destiel Dean? It seems popular
  • Dean: Cas no-
  • Cas: Dean I don't understand... what is fanfiction?
  • Dean: *gets up and goes towards Cas* Come on Cas... give me the laptop buddy
  • Cas: The laptop's warning me of smut. What is smut?
  • Dean: *tries to grab the laptop*
  • Cas: *dodges Dean and starts reading* This... this is very explicit. How do they know all this?
  • Dean: Cas we don't talk about that!
  • Cas:
  • Dean:
  • Dean: Wait a minute I don't understand
  • Cas: It's like they've been spying on us Dean
  • Dean:
  • Cas:
  • Dean:
  • Cas:
  • Dean: *eyes widening* Oh Chuck... SAM!
  • Sam: *trying hard not to laugh* What? People like it!

ok so i went to the listening session earlier and now im gonna try to type out everything i remember from each song. dont expect this to be too coherent as im still extremely overwhelmed from it all. im putting this under a read more bc spoilers obviously but yeah here we go!!!!!

Keep reading

3

So this handsome fellow is Peter Doyle, longtime partner of the great American poet Walt Whitman. He is often viewed as an enigmatic figure, but what we do know about him tells us that he was quite remarkable in his own right.

Pete was born in Limerick, Ireland, and came to the United States with his family when he was eight years old. After the death of his father, he worked hard to support his widowed mother and siblings. One of his brothers, Francis, became a police officer in Washington DC, where the family lived. Francis ended up fighting for the Union during the Civil War, while Pete served in the Confederate Army. He saw serious action and was wounded, discharged from the army, and promptly arrested when he attempted to go back to DC. He managed to get off the hook by claiming that, as an Irish immigrant, he really didn’t care one way or the other about Union versus Confederacy. True or not, this worked, and he was freed.

It was at this point that Pete took a job as a horsecar conductor. In the nearly empty streetcar, on a stormy night in early 1865, Pete met Walt Whitman. Pete as 21 at the time, while Walt was 45. According to the younger man, it was pretty much love at first sight. “We understood,” Pete said. Walt was the only passenger on the streetcar, and he didn’t get off at his planned stop. Instead, he rode with Pete until the end of the route, at which point the two men spent their first night together.

They were inseparable for the next seven or eight years. They’d often go for long walks together, with Walt reciting poetry or passages from Shakespeare. I am 100% not making this up.

And their letters. Oh my God, their letters. Not many of Pete’s to Walt survive, but Walt’s to Pete are so full of love that they’d melt the coldest heart. A sample quote: “My darling, if you are not well when I come back I will get a good room or two in some quiet place, and we will live together and devote ourselves altogether to the job of curing you, and making you stronger and healthier than ever. I have had this in my mind before but never broached it to you.”

As this excerpt implies, Walt very much wanted to make a home with his young partner. Sadly, this would never be possible. Pete, as the oldest unmarried son, saw it as his duty to provide for his mother and siblings. They – and the society in which they lived – had certain expectations. While Walt was on good terms with Pete’s family, getting them to accept wholeheartedly this same-sex relationship was an entirely different matter. The two men had to do with spending nights together.

Pete was definitely a tremendously positive influence on Walt and his work. He persuaded Walt to delete three poems dealing with themes of despair and unrequited love from the 1867 edition of Leaves of Grass. He may have also influenced one of his partner’s best-known works, “O Captain! My Captain!” The tone deals with the death of Abraham Lincoln and the end of the Civil War. It is unusual amongst Whitman’s works because it is rhymed, rather than written in free verse. Walt noted that Pete had quite the rhyming ability, often rattling off charming limericks. Also, some have argued that the metaphor of the ship on the rough sea is a kind of nod to Pete’s immigrant background.

The young immigrant was also an eyewitness to the greatest tragedy of the day. He was in the balcony of Ford’s theater on the night of April 14, 1865, when Lincoln was assassinated. He recounted hearing the shot, and then seeing Booth leap onto the stage. Later, Walt drew on this account as a source of information for his annual Lincoln lectures. And he wouldn’t have heard any of it, if it weren’t for his boyfriend!

Walt suffered a stroke in 1873, and moved to Camden, New Jersey, to live with his brother. He ended staying there until his death in 1892. Pete was unable to find work in Camden, though he did eventually get a job in Philadelphia. They saw each other only sporadically, and at one point Walt had gone so long without hearing from Pete that he thought the younger man had died. He hadn’t, but he was put off by the presence of a housekeeper and other caretakers in his partner’s house. He stayed away, for fear of rousing suspicion as to the true nature of the relationship. After Walt’s death, Pete expressed regret for his hesitation.

In 1897, Pete allowed Richard Maurice Bucke (Walt’s literary executor) to publish the letters written by Walt to Pete. The result was a book called Calamus. No one who read it would have any doubts as to the nature of the love between these two men. It made Pete the black sheep of his Catholic family, and his sister forbade the reading of the book in her house. I think we have to give the man some serious props here. It had to take a hell of a lot of courage to let something like that hit the presses in the 19th century. Maybe he was proud of himself, his partner, and their relationship, and saw no shame or sinfulness in any of it. I sincerely hope that this was the case, and that there was an element of defiance of social and religious norms that went into the publication of Calamus.

Pete remained a member of the “inner circle” of Whitman devotees until his own death in 1907. He is buried in DC’s Congressional Cemetery. His grave marker is a short walk from that of Leonard Matlovich, which famously reads, “they gave me a medal for killing two men, and a discharge for loving one.” Nowadays, Peter Doyle is usually included on history tours of the cemetery which focus on LGBT figures.

Excellent work has been done by Whitman scholars in order to rescue Pete from the shadows of history. We are beginning to understand just how much he influenced Walt, and what a fascinating man he is. “Pete the Great,” as he liked to call himself, is an enigma no more.

And now, to finish off this already very long post, a quick guide to the photos:

Top: Pete aged about 25 years, taken in 1868. Cool hat.

Middle: Pete aged 57, taken circa 1900. Cool mustache.

Bottom: Pete and Walt, circa 1868, ridiculously in love. This might be my favorite historical photograph of all time.

You see the reality of ghost stories is that they would be comforting, not scary if they were true. Like, reassuring proof that we go on after the after. Or a chance to speak with someone who we will never be able to speak with again, but instead we live in a story about us, and about our relationships and about our families, and the choices of our families going back, and back and back, and this story is scary in the same way that a ghost story is scary, because it is unresolved. And filled with symbolism that we just don’t understand. I mean, family history, after all, is just another kind of ghost story.
—  Welcome to Night Vale, “Ghost Stories”
I miss your arms
And your chest—
My favorite pillow.
I miss being able to lean up
And capture your soft lips.
I miss your fluffy hair,
Running my fingers through it.
I miss your strength,
How you don’t budge,
Your protectiveness.
I miss how messy
My hair always gets,
And smelling like sex.
I miss the way you look at me,
The way you smile at me,
The way you hold my hand.
Always tight, intimate, close.
I miss my little crevice,
Being engulfed,
Laughing,
Sitting on your lap.
God, I miss it all so much.
I miss you so much.
You weren’t suppose to leave. I wasn’t suppose to be in the pain I am right now. We were suppose to be together doing everything we loved to do, like go on random trips to random places and eat all the food we loved. I’d be holding your hand as we drove, and sneak over the occasional kisses. We would have our amazing dates where we would dress up, as well as our staying in dates, where we would watch all your favorite shows and movies. Even though I didn’t like some, you know I would always do anything for you. We would have our late night conversations about the most random things like aliens and mermaids. Or about the universe and how we both believed we were soulmates. I’d be admiring the sleeping figure in my arms as your breathing evened out. I’d be observing you as you slept, and not to be creepy at all, but I would always do it any chance I got because dear God, you were so perfect and so unaware of it. I could have sworn you were the one. You brought so much happiness to my life and you made it complete. You encouraged me and believed in me when no one else did. But what happened? How did I end up in the corner of my room sobbing as you left and took my life with you? How did it end like this?

No matter what you think about Liam’s situation you have to acknowledge the huge difference in this quote “When I’m holding him. I remember it was 4 in the morning, and he just turned to me and opened his eyes and looked at me and I was like, ‘oh my god I love you so much, it’s the best thing ever” and Louis saying things like"he’s getting fatter and fatter" or “I know he’s not a dog but” or even “work hard” like work hard is the best you can come up with for a kids card? Either one is fake or they both are and they have learned to play the game better.

10

get to know me meme [16/50 relationships]: Sam Puckett & Freddie Benson

“Yeah, bringing the number of cool people in this room to one … and a half.” 

The first song I ever wrote, I was 10 years old and I was really into System of a Down. And I wrote this song that sounded like System of a Down, but it was called “Chicken Taquito.” No joke. I called it that. And literally, the words were just like, how much I love eating chicken taquitos. In a round-about way. There was singing about mushrooms and green peppers and stuff too.
— 

Brendon Urie

(if you’re ever feeling unsuccessful and like you’ll never go anywhere in life, just remember that Brendon Urie’s first song was about chicken taquitos)