go-find-your-own

anonymous asked:

If Hook was an animal, what animal would he be?

{ That very difficult honestly because many would fit him, but overall, I think a feline due to his grace, a big cat due to his strength, and one with a majestic mane is the most appropriate for him, so lion \o/ Also male lions are territorial and will f ight any intruders/other males who try messing with their ladies, which is a Hook trait both in the ‘this is my space get out or I’ll hurt you’ and ‘this is my lady go find your own’ aspects. Plus he can normally roar like one already.

and I did a sketch of such because I’ve had a design in my head a while kfjh

How to Maintain your Motivation

1. Set realistic and achievable goals. These should be something that appeal to you as it’s hard to go after another person’s goals.

2. Think of meaningful ways to reward your progress.

3. Expect to have set-backs and to encounter obstacles. When that happens, focus your mind and renew your determination. Refuse to give up.

4. Decide to be a positive thinker. Refuse to stop believing in yourself. When you feel discouraged, decide that you’ll fight on.

5. Share your goals with others, and seek encouragement when you’re finding it hard to keep going on your own.

6. Practice saying no to other options and distractions that may seem appealing – but distract you from achieving your goal.

7. Post inspirational quotes in places you can see to encourage you to work to achieve your goal.

8. Practice self care so you don’t burn out. You need to pace yourself if you are going to reach your goal.

Overdependency in Relationships

Overdependency is:

  • Desperately holding on to other people, places or things in an attempt to find meaning and purpose in your life.
  • Letting others do so much for you that it prevents you from developing your own sense of personal autonomy, independence, responsibility and accountability.
  • Being unwilling to let go of others so that you can find your own direction in life.
  • Refusing to formulate your own goals and dreams in case they don’t match those of the people you are dependent on.
  • Having a feeling of emptiness and worthlessness; feeling you “need to be needed” in order to be loved; or having your whole identity wrapped up in someone else.
  • Thinking sympathy and pity are the same thing as love.
  • Having a desperate need for approval; desperately fearing rejection and abandonment by the person you are dependent on; being clingy, possessive and jealous.
  • Lacking a belief in your own competency and ability to cope on your own.
  • Feeling stuck and immobilised because of a fear of failure, or the fear of making the wrong decision.
  • Having a fear of loneliness – which causes you to cling desperately to someone – even when you should let them go.

Overdependency is a control issue because:

  • You are handing control of your life and happiness over to someone else.
  • When you become too dependent on someone, you give them the power to control you.
  • People who are overdependent frequently use manipulation and other subversive control techniques to “hook” others into taking care of them – so that they can rescue, fix or save you. Alternatively, they may use intimidation, threats and coercion.
  • · They use the same hooks to prevent the person from detaching and walking away (For example, by threatening suicide)
  • · They may use the mask of “helplessness” to get others to take care of them, and do things for them.
  • · When forming close relationships, they deliberately look “fixers,” “caretakers” and “rescuers” – that is, they seek out people who are likely to assume responsibility for their wellbeing.

Freedom from overdependency:

  • First, recognise what is going on and be honest with yourself about your patterns and tendencies.
  • Second, recognise that you are a separate person from your partner (or family member). Thus, it’s up to you to assume responsibility for your own choices, decisions and actions (or lack of choosing, deciding and acting). In the same way, stop assume responsibility for, or try to control, the choices and behaviors of others. Don’t speak and act for them, don’t tell them what to do (or how to do it) or redo what they’ve done (as it isn’t the way you would have done it.)
  • · Notice your negative feelings – anxiety, fear, and even terror – and learn to face and manage these. This is one of the most powerful things you can do!
  • · Next, notice how critical you become when others don’t do things your way, or meet the standards that you set for them. Also, notice how you act in response to these feelings. Do you jump in, try to fix, get angry, pout, withdraw sexually and emotionally? It’s time to get rid of those unhealthy behaviours as they’re part of the pattern of dependency.
  • · Consciously work on your self-esteem.  Don’t look to others to make you happy, or to feel you have worth and significance. Healthy self-esteem comes from the inside out.
  • · Recognise the value of boundaries – and know where you end and another begins. Learn to establish and enforce your boundaries, and accept that others can choose for themselves – so don’t manipulate to try and get your way.
  • Stop blaming others for making you upset. We have control of how we think and feel. You’re not a helpless victim – you can choose how you will live, and what you will accept in your relationships.
  • · Don’t take the flack for, or defend others’ behaviour. Allow them let them to feel the consequences of their actions. Stop defending and enabling them.
  • · Get professional help.  Being dependent in relationships often has its roots in our early childhood experiences. You may some need help to unravel that, and better understand why you act the way you do.
6

You’ve played the MC in these games. Why not play the MC in your own life? Learn to love your demons and monsters. Kiss princes. Don’t think anything is impossible or stupid. Grant wishes when you can. Remember that power is not everything. Go find your own Super Happy Ending. 

Thanks Voltage for everything <3

Levi with Eren

Eren: Levi, I`m so tired.

Levi: Poor thing, come lie down with me.

Levi with everyone else.

Oluo: Captain, I`m tired.

Levi: I don`t give a fuck, get back to work.

Levi with Eren

Eren: I`m hungry Levi!

Levi: It`s okay, I made you lunch already it`s in the kitchen.

Eren: You`re the best!

Levi with everyone else

Eld: I`m kinda hungry Captain.

Levi: Do I look like a damn slave to you? Go find your own food.

Levi with Eren

Eren: You`re so gorgeous Levi.

Levi: *blushes*

Levi with everyone else

Gunther: Oh Captain, you look nice today!

Levi: I look nice everyday, the hell are you trying to say?

Gunther: N-nothing sir I was just-

Levi: stfu

To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.
—  Bill Watterson
Anything that keeps you happy and writing is part of my writing ritual: I like music, so I tend to have it playing in the background. But if I’m interested, I can write in an airport waiting areas.
—  Neil Gaiman
New Year Resolutions for the Signs
  • Aries: Learn to listen to other people and try to understand where they're coming from. You'd be surprised with what you find.
  • Taurus: There's a reason why life doesn't come with a safety net, you have to learn to adapt to its craziness.
  • Gemini: Having a lot of interests is great, but try to master something this year. Remember, it's okay to have fun, but sometimes you need to be serious.
  • Cancer: Take deep breaths and don't let your worth depend on other people. Don't let your insecurity drive people away.
  • Leo: Stop trying so hard, you already have a lot of people that care about you.
  • Virgo: You are enough. You don't need to have people walk all over you to prove that.
  • Libra: Stop worrying that people will hate you and find your voice. Speak up more.
  • Scorpio: Don't let extremes dominate your life, find your own balance.
  • Sagittarius: Travel. Go somewhere this year, even if you have to use your imagination. Learn about another culture.
  • Capricorn: Your shoulders are too heavy; put some of that weight down and talk to someone. You don't have to do it all alone.
  • Aquarius: Talk to more people. Don't judge a book by its cover, even shallow rivers support life.
  • Pisces: Be careful of who you open your heart to. It is a precious organ, don't give it to just anyone.
Overdependency in Relationships

Overdependency is:

- Desperately holding on to other people, places or things in an attempt to find meaning and purpose in your life.

- Letting others do so much for you that it prevents you from developing your own sense of personal autonomy, independence, responsibility and accountability.

- Being unwilling to let go of others so that you can find your own direction in life.

- Refusing to formulate your own goals and dreams in case they don’t match those of the people you are dependent on.

- Having a feeling of emptiness and worthlessness; feeling you “need to be needed” in order to be loved; or having your whole identity wrapped up in someone else.

- Thinking sympathy and pity are the same thing as love.

- Having a desperate need for approval; desperately fearing rejection and abandonment by the person you are dependent on; being clingy, possessive and jealous.

- Lacking a belief in your own competency and ability to cope on your own.

- Feeling stuck and immobilised because of a fear of failure, or the fear of making the wrong decision.

- Having a fear of loneliness – which causes you to cling desperately to someone – even when you should let them go.

Overdependency is a control issue because:

- You are handing control of your life and happiness over to someone else.

- When you become too dependent on someone, you give them the power to control you.

- People who are overdependent frequently use manipulation and other subversive control techniques to “hook” others into taking care of them – so that they can rescue, fix or save you. Alternatively, they may use intimidation, threats and coercion.

- They use the same hooks to prevent the person from detaching and walking away (For example, by threatening suicide)

- They may use the mask of “helplessness” to get others to take care of them, and do things for them.

- When forming close relationships, they deliberately look “fixers,” “caretakers” and “rescuers” – that is, they seek out people who are likely to assume responsibility for their wellbeing.

Freedom from overdependency:

- First, recognise what is going on and be honest with yourself about your patterns and tendencies.

- Second, recognise that you are a separate person from your partner (or family member). Thus, it’s up to you to assume responsibility for your own choices, decisions and actions (or lack of choosing, deciding and acting). In the same way, stop assume responsibility for, or try to control, the choices and behaviors of others. Don’t speak and act for them, don’t tell them what to do (or how to do it) or redo what they’ve done (as it isn’t the way you would have done it.)

- Notice your negative feelings – anxiety, fear, and even terror – and learn to face and manage these. This is one of the most powerful things you can do!

· Next, notice how critical you become when others don’t do things your way, or meet the standards that you set for them. Also, notice how you act in response to these feelings. Do you jump in, try to fix, get angry, pout, withdraw sexually and emotionally? It’s time to get rid of those unhealthy behaviours as they’re part of the pattern of dependency.

- Consciously work on your self-esteem. Don’t look to others to makyou happy, or to feel you have worth and significance. Healthy self-esteem comes from the inside out.

- Recognise the value of boundaries – and know where you end and another begins. Learn to establish and enforce your boundaries, and accept that others can choose for themselves – so don’t manipulate to try and get your way.

- Stop blaming others for making you upset. We have control of how we think and feel. You’re not a helpless victim – you can choose how you will live, and what you will accept in your relationships.

- Don’t take the flack for, or defend others’ behaviour. Allow them let them to feel the consequences of their actions. Stop defending and enabling them.

- Get professional help. Being dependent in relationships often has its roots in our early childhood experiences. You may some need help to unravel that, and better understand why you act the way you do.