global concern

Do you want to put the name of the President of the United States on a building in a country with a high risk of terrorist attacks? … I think that’s asking for trouble. … It certainly doesn’t help to have a president who makes insulting comments about other people’s religion — that certainly gets the extremists energized. I think there’s a serious global security concern with having the president’s name up on these buildings, and we could get sucked into something overseas because something happens to one of those buildings and the people in it.
—  Richard Painter, former chief ethics lawyer for President George W. Bush

RIP Miguel Ferrer :(

“Now you listen to me. While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a naysayer and hatchetman in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I’ll gladly take another because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject absolutely revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method… is love. I love you Sheriff Truman.”

“While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a naysayer and hatchetman in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I’ll gladly take another because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject absolutely revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method… is love. I love you Sheriff Truman.”

RIP, Miguel. Albert Rosenfield’s words mean more to me today than ever.

theatlantic.com
Why Geography Is Undermining Democracy Around the World
How politics pits demographic groups against each other
By Jon Emont

The outsized influence of rural voters may seem like a unique feature—or bug—of the American political system. But a similar story recurs in places around the world. In over 20 countries, from Argentina, to Malaysia, to Japan, the structure of the electoral systems gives rural voters disproportionate power, relative to their numbers, over their more numerous urban-dwelling counterparts. And on certain issues, this can shift national priorities in favor of rural ones. In the United States in 2016, for example, the Republican platform called for eliminating federal funding for public transit, arguing that it “serves only a small portion of the population, concentrated in six big cities,” implying that Trump’s expected infrastructure bill could focus on highways rather than on urban transit networks. Global warming, of special concern to urban coastal voters, has been described essentially as intriguing speculation by the president-elect.

In America, each state, regardless of population size, receives at least three electors, and a candidate who wins a majority of a state’s popular vote wins all of its electors, assuming all those electors accept the vote (with the exceptions of Nebraska and Maine). Effectively, this means that the 259,000 registered voters of more-rural, mostly conservative Wyoming, have around three and a half times as much representation in the electoral college as the 12.5 million and 18 million voters, respectively, of large, heavily urban states like New York and California.

Now you listen to me. While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a naysayer and hatchet-man in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I’ll gladly take another because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject absolutely revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method…is love. I love you, Sheriff Truman.

“Girls have low self-esteem” is a cause for global concern, demanding millions spent to correct it.

“Boys have fragile egos” is something funny that should be mocked and exploited.

Instead of asking why male egos are so delicate, wondering if it might be something to do with the harmful pressures of society, and trying to do something about it, let’s mock male vulnerability whilst simultaneously denying that men face any social issues.

4

“My second concern is to articulate that, when all is said and done, the issue raised by Bamako is not a purely African issue. It is bigger than Africa. We’re talking about the world of money, the power of money. And if today, the prejudice of this world of money… Because globalization is about how we can make more money, and how quickly. It isn’t about trying to embrace one another as quickly as possible and give everyone kisses. This is not globalization. And this needs to be made clear. So it’s very important for me that people understand that today it is not feasible to continue depriving part of the world of its wealth to make the rest more wealthy. If the consequences of this are clear in Africa today, it’s because Africa is weaker, and so the repercussions are visible. But the West, too, will have to pay the consequences of this world view, this money-centered ethic.”  

Abderrahmane Sissako talking about the motivation for his film Bamako (2006).

One Man’s Hell: Part 3

“truth or dare.”
“i’m waitin-”
“no one tells me what to do!”
“you got yourself in the middle of something global.”
“your concern is touching.”
“you can’t save the whole would. you can’t even save yourself.”
“you have to!”
“oh, you’re down and you’re not coming back, huh?”
“do you think i get my thrills living vicariously?”
“do you think i don’t know hurt?”
“you never had a clue.”
“i need you to be here.”
“i’ve been sweeping all the channels for hours.”
“i am most decidedly not okay.”
“he’s our missing piece. he’s at the centre of this. find him for me- wherever he is.”
“we have a guarantee from the world bank to finance this project in your country.”
“that’s your best?”
“i competed professionally in aikdo and tae kwan do.”
“all those innocents.”
“you held out hope to people who had none.”
“give me one good reason why i shouldn’t throw you to the street.”
“he’s no worth it.”
“you weren’t there.”
“you’ve stopped him.”
“they’re coming to pick him up.”
“it’s no enough.”
“i’m sorry… ”
“he’s all yours.”
“how about a caribbean vacation?”
“what kind of vacation were you expecting?”
“sun. sand. tall drinks and taller surfers.”
“is that really what you want?”

My favorite people on the internet are the ones that get really mad when everyone else starts talking about something they’re not interested in. “Nobody cares about the color of that dress! Now if you’ll excuse me I’m going to post the results of 80,000 ‘Which TGIF Character Are You?’ quizzes.”

The other one that cracks me up is the ones that say things like “Wow, I wish you guys spent as much time (insert a terrible global concern, like trying to end world hunger) as you do debating the color of that dress!” Are those the two options? I mean, it’s not like I was drawing up the plans to cure cancer then threw it in the trash so I could see if a dress is gold or blue. @TrillWeedKermit69 isn’t neglecting his job at a Haitian orphanage to tweet about magic eye tricks. Plus, settle down. You’ve apparently been scrolling through social media long enough to get annoyed with it so put down your phone and get to work on the rain forest.
—  Rob Fee