global 2013

FBI Director James Comey says “absolute privacy” no longer exists in America

  • “Absolute privacy” does not exist in America, FBI Director James Comey said Wednesday during a conference on cybersecurity in Boston.
  • “All of us have a reasonable expectation of privacy in our homes, in our cars and in our devices,” Comey said. “But [a reasonable expectation of privacy] also means with good reason, in court, government, through law enforcement, can invade our private spaces.”
  • “There is no such thing as absolute privacy in America.”
  • Comey was discussing the rising prevalence of encryption software since Edward Snowden revealed information about the National Security Agency’s global surveillance programs in 2013; such software prevented the FBI from accessing 1,200 of the 2,800 devices it was granted permission to search at the end of 2016. Read more (3/9/17 12:49 PM)

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The Only Way to Stop Climate Change Now May Be Revolution

So it’s come to this.

Last year, a researcher presented a paper on climate change at the American Geophysical Union’s meeting entitled ”Is Earth F**ked?” which advocated “environmental direct action, resistance taken from outside the dominant culture, as in protests, blockades and sabotage by indigenous peoples, workers, anarchists and other activist groups.”

Last month, the Philippines climate commissioner and self-styled revolutionary Naderev “Yeb” Saño held a 13-day fast in the midst of an international climate summit, just hours after Typhoon Haiyan ravaged his home country. In a tearful speech quoting Gandhi, he said: “We cannot sit and stay helpless staring at this international climate stalemate. It is now time to take action. We need an emergency climate pathway.”

And only last week, a conference of climate scientists in London explored the theme of “radical emissions reduction” after noting that “nothing that we’ve said or done to date about climate change has made any detectable dip whatsoever”. Via a weblink, author Naomi Klein compared the fight against climate change with the struggle against South African apartheid, and said, “an agenda capable of delivering radical emissions reductions will only advance if accompanied by a radical movement.”

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PAKISTAN. Outskirts of Islamabad and Rawalpindi. Daily life of Afghan refugees. For more than three decades, Pakistan has been home to one of the world’s largest refugee communities: the more than one million Afghans who have fled years of war in their home country. This massive and persistent population remains vulnerable to multiple dangers, from outbreaks of disease to violence spilling over from the war next door. AP photographer Muhammed Muheisen has spent the past several years in Pakistan, documenting the lives of these refugees, with a particular focus on the most vulnerable: the children caught up in the chaos as their families try to keep them safe.

(1) An Afghan refugee, her burka billowing, holds her daughter as she walks to her home through an alley of a poor neighbourhood on September 16, 2013.

(2) Afghan refugee girls, background, repeat verses of the Quran after their classmate Mohammed Akbar, 7, during a daily class to learn how to read verses of the Quran at a mosque in a poor neighbourhood on March 24, 2010.

(3) Rozeena Zaman, 7, an Afghan refugee, watches other children playing in a poor neighbourhood on February 10, 2010.

(4) An Afghan refugee hides in a wooden cart near his home in a poor neighbourhood on February 2, 2014.

(5) Afghan refugee Samiullah Afsar, 5, smiles while carrying a puppy he found in a pile of a garbage on October 18, 2012.

(6) Afghan refugees play a traditional fighting game in a field, as the sun sets on January 24, 2014.

Photographs: Muhammed Muheisen/AP

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PAKISTAN. Islamabad. Portraits of Afghan child refugees. For more than three decades, Pakistan has been home to one of the world’s largest and most protracted refugee populations in the world: the more than 1.6 million Afghans who have fled years of warfare in their home country. 

Living in temporary shelters along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, this massive and persistent population remains vulnerable to multiple dangers, from outbreaks of disease to violence spilling over from the war next door. Thousands of them still live without electricity, running water and other basic services.

(1) November 12, 2013. Afghan refugee Hasanat Mohammed, 5, poses for a picture while standing outside his home in a poor neighbourhood.

(2) Robina Haseeb, age 5. Photo taken on January 24, 2014. “The hard life they live is so obvious to see in their faces. Their beauty is mixed with the rough life condition they endure everyday.”

(3) Afghan refugee Gul Bibi Shamra, 3, poses for a picture, while playing with other children in a slum on January 24, 2014. “They are so young in age but, unlike most children they are old in experience and know how to persevere.”

(4) Awal Gul, age 12. Photo taken on January 24, 2014. “I am always amazed how the Afghan refugee children enjoy their time with nothing. They create elaborate games with no money and they are so creative.”

Photographs: Muhammed Muheisen/AP

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PAKISTAN. Outskirts of Islamabad. Portraits and daily life of Afghan child refugees. Associated Press photographer Muhammed Muheisen has spent the past several years in Pakistan, documenting the lives of these refugees, with a particular focus on the most vulnerable: the children caught up in the chaos as their families try to keep them safe.

(1) January 25, 2014. Nazmina Bibi, 7, poses for a picture, while playing with other children in a slum.

(2) Afghan refugee boys play on a hill near the slum where they live with their families on April 12, 2013.

(3) Safia Mourad, age 4. Photo taken on January 24, 2014.

(4) Afghan refugee children follow a performance organised by the Hashoo foundation, in a tent at their camp on February 10, 2011.

(5) Afghan refugee boy, Allam Ahmad, 6, poses on January 27, 2014.

Photograph: Muhammed Muheisen/AP