girls experience

3

@tobumori​ suggested Kiyoko + red, gold, and midnight blue; and @caligynephobia​ suggested Shizuku + black and purple! These two characters have very similar character designs that they look like they could be cousins lol so I wanted to draw them together to see how it’d turn out ✨ Thank you so much for sending your prompts!~

Hey to all those people telling people “ it’s not so bad, just power through the cramps” when they're on their period because it’s not an excuse to miss school/work etc.!

I had bad cramps today, but I tried to “power through it” and went to class anyways, even though my grandmother had to drive me because I couldn’t walk to the bus.

I tried to “power through it” when I started to feel like I was going to throw up in the middle of my lecture, leaving to take a walk outside in the cold to try and clear my head, even though walking made my right side feel as though it was being ripped in two.

I tried to “power through it” when I started getting cold sweat all over my body, taking off my sweater and then putting it back on two seconds later because my body couldn’t decide if it was hot or cold.

 I tried to “power through it” when spots started to appear in my vision, and just kept walking towards the exit.

I tried to “power through it” when I started to dry heave, and started walking faster.

I tried to “power through it” when my ears started ringing and the spots took over my vision and I was so so hot but shivering and my side felt on fire and twisted into knots and stabbed all at once.

I tried to power through it to the point where I collapsed in the middle of my college hallway. A stranger brought me to Outreach Services, where I lay on the floor, vomiting, for an hour until somebody could pick me up and take me home.

The school paramedics told me that I had passed out because I put too much stress on my already taxed body. My body was taxed because of hormonal fluctuations and blood loss aka my period.

Nothing like this has ever happened to me before. In the past when I’ve had cramps like this, I’ve stayed in bed and eaten strawberries and watched MASH all day.

So don’t you DARE tell me that you should “power through the cramps and do it anyways”. Powering through made me pass out. Powering through made me have to be wheeled out of the school in a wheelchair because I couldn’t keep my balance to walk. Powering through made my grandmother with osteoporosis and a tendency to panic have to come pick me up from school and help me up the stairs and almost break her hip when I started to collapse backwards on the front steps. Powering through made my 13 year old brother have to supervise me while I took a bath because I was afraid I would pass out and drown (he was super sweet about it actually; we closed the curtain and he read me Voyage of the Dawn Treader). Powering through made my mother who works to support our family pretty much on her own have to take time off work to come home and make sure I was okay.

In conclusion; If someone feels crappy because of their period cramps, leave them alone. Don’t make them do things anyways, because you might make it worse. And definitely don’t make them feel bad for not wanting to do things because of cramps; that’s the reason I even got out of bed this morning. Be nice to people on their period. Possibly buy them chocolate or painkillers. Nut don’t make them do things when they have cramps, and definitely don’t tell them “it’s nothing, power through” because cramps? Cramps can be one of the worst things you could possibly imagine.

Seriously. Fuck you all.

how to do prom on a budget

Because not everyone can afford to spend a ridiculous amount of money on one high school dance, but that absolutely does not mean that you can’t enjoy your evening to the fullest. 

  • Your prom dress definitely does not have to cost several hundred dollars. Amazon.com has some really nice formal dresses, and most of them are in the $50-100 range! (I know there are other websites specifically for discount prom dresses, but in my experience Amazon has better quality and lower prices. Plus prime shipping can be a lifesaver if you’re in a rush.)
  • And if fifty bucks is still out of your price range (and I know that it is for a lot of people), check your local thrift stores. Second-hand prom dresses sell for a fraction of their original price, and they’ve usually only been worn once or twice. Seriously, I got my first prom dress at a thrift store; it was a very pretty, very well-made dress, and I payed $15 for it. Check. Thrift. Stores. 
  • Or, if you just don’t like second-hand clothes or if you couldn’t find anything good in the thrift stores, check Ross or a similar store. (Ross is just what we have in my hometown.) They usually stock some formal dresses around prom season, and they’re almost all in the $20-30 range. I’ve gone to formal events in dresses from Ross before, and they hold up really well and look great in pictures.
  • All of the stores I just mentioned are also really good places to get shoes, jewelry, ect. to go with your dress. Even stores like Walmart and Target might be good places to look for shoes, bags, and other accessories. And definitely check your own wardrobe – you might already own stuff that will look good with your dress. (I’ve worn the same pair of heels to, like, three different proms at this point tbh.) 
  • Get a dress that fits you well without alterations. Seriously, tailors are so pricey – you’ll probably end up paying several times more for alterations than you did for the dress itself. You’ll save yourself a lot of money if you just buy a dress that already fits and looks good. 
  • Do your own hair and makeup. There are approximately two billion “prom hair and makeup” tutorials on YouTube – find one that you like and practice it a couple of times before the big night. 
  • And if you aren’t confident enough to do it yourself, call in a friend for help. I’m totally useless when it comes to hair, but my best friend is a hair genius. We would always get ready for dances together, and we’d do a trade-off; she’d do my hair for me, and I’d help her with her makeup, and then we’d both go to the dance looking amazing. It’s a good system, and makes getting ready a lot more fun.
  • Or, if you don’t want to do your own makeup and don’t have a friend you can ask, a lot of department stores that have makeup counters (Macy’s, Belk, ect.) will do free makeovers, even if you don’t buy any of the products! I had a friend in high school who always got her makeup done at Belk for school dances. I don’t like trusting a stranger to do my makeup, but it is an option if you want to get it done professionally without spending a lot of money. (MAC and Sephora both do “free” makeovers, but only if you make a $50 purchase first, so probably not the best option if you’re trying to save money. Always make sure that the makeover service really is free before you sit down in the makeup chair.)
  • Also, you absolutely do not have to wear dramatic makeup or complicated hairstyles to prom if you don’t want to. If bold makeup isn’t your thing, you can just do mascara and a little bit of lip gloss. If you don’t want to spend two hours on your hair, just wear it down, or pin it up in a really simple bun, or whatever works for you. You don’t even have to wear a dress if you don’t want to – if renting a tux is more your speed, then rent a tux. Feeling comfortable and confident in how you look is more important than following trends. 

shout out to girls with scoliosis

shout out to girls with scoliosis who’s backs constantly hurt no matter how they sit, stay or lay

shout out to girls with scoliosis who’ve had to wear backbraces that make them feel awkward and out of place. and are also really hot sweaty and uncomfortable

shout out to girls scoliosis who have been called deformed, made fun of for their posture, been called a hunchback etc

shout out to girls with scoliosis who feel super self conscious wearing anything that shows their back because of their scars and/or the curve of their spine

shout out to girls with scoliosis who sometimes exert themselves a little more physically than they should because they’re scared to ask for help since society conditions us to think asking for help makes us weak.

WE’RE STRONG AND BEAUTIFUL AND AWESOME. WE NEED TO REMEMBER THAT EVEN THOUGH OTHERS DON’T WANT US TO BELIEVE IT

a (revised) reminder to trans people

if you identify with a gender other than the one you were assigned with at birth, you are transgender.
it doesn’t matter if you want to transition or not, it doesn’t matter what your pronouns are or the way you dress, it doesn’t matter if you don’t experience dysphoria.
dysphoria is not always primarily presenting in transgender people. and while dysphoria is a mental condition, being transgender is not.
nothing can define if you are transgender or not besides if you identify with a different gender than the one you were assigned at birth. you can’t decide to be transgender, you can’t decide whether or not you have dysphoria, but you can decide whether or not you want to act on it.
there’s not one way to be trans. as a person who is trans and has experienced dysphoria, even i know this. so stop policing trans people who don’t want to transition or don’t experience dysphoria. everyone’s different.