girl violence

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This is just one of the many reasons why we need our own movement! These men are supposed to be out here uplifting the community but only men can safely receive the free food they are handing out. Black women and girls are harassed and threatened with violence. This is traumatizing.

#ProtectBlackWomen
#ProtectBlackGirls

First You Came for the Trans Women: An Open Letter to the Chicago Dyke March Collective

Core Members of the Chicago Dyke March Collective (CDMC),

I am a Jew. I am also the first trans woman to have been a member of your collective. I am writing in regards to your collective’s decision to ask three women carrying Jewish pride flags to leave the 2017 Chicago Dyke March.

My interest in questions regarding inclusion at the Chicago Dyke March goes at least as far back as 2009, the year when I became a core member of your collective. Almost immediately I became concerned when another core member violated a trans woman’s privacy in such a way that, had it happened to me, I would have considered it a violation of my sexual boundaries. In the backlash that ensued after I voiced my complaint other core members put their feelings before trans women’s need for safety and scapegoated me. It was only after the aforementioned core member of your collective violated my sexual boundaries, demonstrating even to the most loyal member of your collective that my concerns were justified, that the verbal abuse subsided. But still no justice. It was nearly two years before representatives of your collective met with me to talk about what had happened. Your collective made four promises to me and to Chicago’s queer and trans community. It immediately kept the only promise that required it to do nothing substantial—the promise to publicly apologize. To this day it has not kept its other three promises. But it has found new ways to hurt me, including publishing personal correspondence that had the potential to out me. The last time I asked CDMC about its cascading failure, it gave me no collective answer, but in 2012 one of its members responded in a way that now seems like eerie foreshadowing: She said that your collective owed me nothing because I had already gotten my “pound of flesh”, thus drawing a connection between me and an antisemitic caricature.

I am hardly the only one who wants answers from your collective. Many people are now asking, “Was the Chicago Dyke March Collective’s decision to ask three Jewish women to leave the march antisemitic?” It is a fair question. The political right likes to use divide-and-conquer schemes to keep us from uniting to confront oppression. As April Rosenblum argued in The Past Didn’t Go Anywhere, one of the most successful instances of this scheme has been the scapegoating of Jewish people to keep us from focusing on our real oppressors. Blaming diasporic Jewish people for the actions of the State of Israel is the latest variation on a theme at least as old as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Of course not all fair questions have “yes” as an answer. To find out if your collective’s actions play into systemic bias against Jewish people we need to look at the facts. I was not at the march, so I will charitably assume the account your collective gave in its statement is true. You wrote, “We have since learned that at least one of these individuals is a regional director for A Wider Bridge” (emphasis mine). Does it need to be said that what you learned about one of the Jewish women after you asked her to leave the march could not have been the reason you asked the women to leave the march? You also wrote that the women were “carrying Israeli flags superimposed on rainbow flags”. If the flags you were referring to were like the one seen in a photograph published to the web site of the Windy City Times on Saturday, there was nothing superimposed on them besides Stars of David, making them no different from the Jewish pride flags I first saw at Dyke March in 2005 (five years before A Wider Bridge was founded). The Star of David is a symbol of Judaism and my people, the Jewish people, and there is nothing inherently Zionist about it. It is evident to me that your collective has put some people’s feelings before Jewish queer women’s need for queer community.

I find no comfort in your assurance that “anti-Zionist Jewish volunteers and supporters are welcome at Dyke March and were involved in conversations with the individuals who were asked to leave”. For one thing, Jewish people, including those of us who express our pride through the use of Jewish symbolism, should not have to be extensively educated on all political viewpoints before we can participate in an event that is purportedly for all “dyke, queer, and trans” people. For another, all too often Jewish people are subjected to a political litmus test that non-Jewish people are not. (Nobody asked me what my views on Palestine were before they found out I had Jewish ancestry. Such selective outspokenness on Palestine does a disservice to both Jews and Palestinians.) Finally, it reminds me of the reassurances I heard after your collective violated me—that there were trans people who nevertheless stood among you. The goal of solidarity is not to collect oppressed people to insulate yourself from criticism even while you crush us. Rather, the goal of solidarity is to stand with all who are being crushed throughout our struggles even while we resist internalized oppression. In 2010 your collective’s insistence that I was “welcome” to participate in a march with people who had hurt me did not stop your collective from violating me again. And in 2017 your collective’s insistence that the Jewish people you approve of are “welcome” to participate in a march where my people have been harassed does not make your collective any less antisemitic.

L’shalom,
Veronika Boundless

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International Day of the Girl

Fierce little dancers dancing to Beyonce’s “Freedom”.

Fair Play

Marvel Writing Challenge: redgillan vs. girl-next-door-writes

Prompt: Corn Maze

Pairings: Bucky Barnes x Reader

Word Count: 1,861

Tags: Language, Violence, Fluff

Originally posted by mcuvillainsdaily

It was Hell on Earth.

People were screaming everywhere, but it was nothing compared to the loud squeaking noise of the machines and the reeking, hot scent of butter and sugar. The fair…, you shivered.

Families and groups of friends were happily running around, making you feel dizzy as you tried to find your target. You wanted to push everyone out of your way, but instead you dodged between them. You stopped to have a good look around at your surroundings, turning on yourself in the crowd.

Soon people started to raise eyebrows as they walked past you, their eyes scanned you from head to toe. You rolled your eyes, choosing to focus on your mission rather than their sly smirks.

Yes, you were wearing a tight spandex black suit, so what? It was your battle outfit and it made you feel confident and strong. The kind of feelings that make saving the world a bit less stressful.

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