gif: go on

School

I’m curious- do different MBTI types like specific school subjects? so if you can pls pls tell me

my favourite subject(s) is:

the subject(s) i excel at is:

and

the subject(s) i hate the most:

it doesnt matter if you’re still in school or you’re not, i’m just curious :)


me- ENTP

my favourite subject(s) is: music, chem

the subject(s) i excel at is: math, physics

the subject(s) i hate the most: PE/Gym, geo

youtube

@behindthemaddness HUGH IS SO SASSY @0:27 “A not American?” Holy crap babyyyy please give us more sass. On a serious note though, I can imagine that having people question your OBVIOUS accent gets rather annoying. Like the vid where Hugh defends Mads’ accent when it is brought up.

THIS MAN IS THE MOST CRINGE-WORTHY AMERICAN I HAVE EVER SEEN INTERVIEW ANYONE. 

*man sings ‘Down Under’*

me and Rose Byrne alike: 

Originally posted by alien-daays

please never do that again to ANYONE wtfffff

So what I’ve learned…

Hugh Dancy + accent related questions = just don’t

Hugh Dancy + accent =

ANOTHER THING: HUGH DANCY WAS EMBARRASSED WHEN ASKED TO TRY AN AMERICAN ACCENT (which the man is a jackass who shouldn’t have asked tbh) BUT THEN HE TOOK ON WILL GRAHAM, A VIRGINIAN AND I AM DYIN G

He took on my drawl, ya’ll, and….I never want to type that ever again. I’m sorry. Now I’m cringing at myself..

3

Now you see it, now you see it again Pt 14: A coat tale

Coats of the late 1920s tended to be simpler than the outfits worn underneath. They typically closed with just a single, large button or extravagant, feature tab and buckle, wrapped and fastened to one side. They had few decorations; trim was usually narrow side panels, sometimes with cording, self-fabric trim, or embroidery on the sides or back. Many had fur shawl collars. Belts were not required and were optional as an ornamental feature that usually did not go all the way around the coat. 

Phryne wears a black and white woven cheviot wool coat, with white panel inserts at the sides and back, as well as from elbow to cuff, accessorised with black and/or white. It makes appearances in both Series 1 and 2.

And what a tale this coat could tell.

In Raisins and Almonds a complex plot involves allegiances - adherence to causes and family relationships that are tested. Marriage is scrutinised from the perspective of those honouring the commitment despite physical and emotional distance.

Phryne is investigating the death of a young man, Saul Michaels, a supporter of the Zionist cause. She, with Simon Abrahams, visits Josi Stein, a fellow Zionist, at the Kadimah to learn the meaning of a hand-written classical Hebrew note on a page from a text, which might offer a clue to the mysterious death.  We see the coat, accessorised with black and white down to the shoes, including a rather extraordinary brooch of  yarn and miniature knitting needles:

Josi Stein has little interest in helping Phryne investigate his friend’s death and is more interested in keeping the document than providing a translation.

Phryne: Mr Stein, I’ve unearthed some evidence that may explain your friend’s death, but I need help to understand it. 

Josi: … Saul was a student of Kabbalah, religious philosophical teachings. It may be from one of his books. That is all I know. 

Phryne: And this handwritten annotation, do you know what that means? It looks like Old Hebrew. 

Josi: Perhaps I could translate, but I would need to refer to some texts. If I can study it… 

Phryne doesn’t fall for that ruse and takes herself to the dead man’s rooms above the shoe shop.  Whilst an apprentice to Chaim Abrahams the cobbler, the victim was also a student, so the room is part bedroom, part study, part chemistry lab.  The coat contrasts the bright yellow walls of the bed-sit as Phryne begins to see that there may be a link between the Hebrew text, the lab and the young man’s death.

But the discovery of something far more rudimentary in the room leads to a more immediate clue…

and a consequent confrontation with Miss Leigh, to this point the chief suspect in the case. 

Phryne: Were you having a dalliance with Saul? 

Miss Leigh: That is none of your business. 

Phryne: For goodness sake, woman, I’m trying to save you from the gallows! 

We see the bars of the cell shadowing the wall and across Phryne’s coat as Miss Leigh admits to being Saul’s lover, despite the fact that she knew he would return to his wife overseas once he was able.

Miss Leigh: Saul had more to lose than I. He had a wife in Poland. They married at 16, but when he left, she promised that she would wait for him until they could be together in the Holy Land.

And a seque  - to the coat, Phryne and our Jack as Miss Leigh’s circumstances, and Phryne’s urging of her innocence, lead ultimately to Jack’s own revelations. First, his knowledge of Science.

Jack: I doubt my Ancient Hebrew will impress you, but I studied enough science to recognise those symbols. This is the symbol for lead and the symbol for gold. He who could turn lead into gold could cure all disease and make men immortal, theoretically. But how does it help Miss Leigh? 

Phryne: She wouldn’t have killed him, Jack. She loved him. They were having an affair. 

Jack: He was married. 

Phryne: It happens. 

Jack: Well, there’s your motive. Miss Leigh wouldn’t be the first woman to kill in a jealous rage. 

Phryne: Miss Leigh doesn’t seem the type to rage. 

Then Phryne and the coat go off to find the translation of the annotation.

Phryne: I need your help with my investigations, Mr Abrahams. I understand that you can translate from Old Hebrew…

Mr B Abrahams:  This is mystical nonsense. 

Phryne: But it was important to Saul, and I suspect it has something to do with his death. 

Mr B Abrahams: Show me. ‘The invisible will become visible only through flames.' 

The man of honour is able to reveal the significance of the ‘mystical nonsense’, 

and whilst contemplating what to write to the distant widow, the most intimate of his reveals is divulged:

Jack: I went to war a newlywed. 

Phryne: But you came home. 

Jack: Not the man my wife married… 16 years ago. 

Phryne: War will do that to you. 

Jack: My wife’s been living with her sister for some time now. But a marriage is still a marriage, Miss Fisher. 

Phryne: Especially to a man of honour.

(I know, I know, she wasn’t actually wearing the coat in the last two pics but I just couldn’t stop myself it was required for context.)

And so to a favourite Ep for many of us: Dead Air.  

The coat appropriately reappears in an episode where Phryne’s outfits reflect the glamour of the radio stars of the 1920s.  Teemed again with the black French ‘cat-burglar’ beret, she also wears black gloves, and the coat supports a large cream cameo brooch to the lapel.

The radio station airs a popular series called The Polkinghorns with the main characters played by Jimmy and Hazel Creswick, her role winning Hazel an award.  

Playing parts is a motif throughout - Jack plays Archie, Phryne  plays a role or two, and Jimmy who plays Maurice Polkinghorn is really Harry. Uncovering who’s really who is critical to solving the murder.

It’s late in the ep that Phryne goes back to the radio station to flush out the killer by playing an old recording of a program associated with a past murder.  Sleazy Clarry continues to try his luck:

Phryne: Could you play this next? Special request. 

Clarry: Do I get one in return? 

Phryne: Save your breath, Clarry. Your charms are lost on me.

The recording of Twilight Melodies reveals Jimmy Creswick’s true identity, that of the former Harry Redpath, who is forced to show his hand (holding a gun).

Phryne: Louisa found you out, didn’t she, Harry? Remembered your voice from her time in Perth… You dragged her body outside. Clarence couldn’t hear any of it. Then you continued on to the awards night as if nothing had happened, and poor old Dodger saw it all. You realised he witnessed the murder, so you killed him too. 

Jimmy/Harry: You’re not moving until Hazel walks through that door. She defied me, and if I can’t have her, no-one will. I will kill her. And I’ll kill you too, Miss Fisher.

Phryne manages to clobber Jimmy/Harry and Jack arrives to make the arrest, his transformation from Archie back to DI complete.

And some teasing from Phryne:

Jack: Miss Fisher? 

Phryne: Hope you enjoyed the show, Jack. 

Jack: Constable, get him up. Harry Redpath, you’re under arrest for the murders of Guinevere Redpath, Louisa Singleton and John Lockhart. And the attempted murder of Hazel Creswick. 

Phryne: You took your time.

And so ends this coat’s tale, although the episode concludes with Phryne wearing a  stunningly sensuous evening gown that reflects the colours of the coat.  (And I need any excuse or feeble link to post that duet…).  It is chiffon and lace heavily sequinned and beaded with black and white pearls in intricate floral and fleurs de lys patterns. It swings and sways as she sashays into the room where Jack is at the piano.

Phryne and Jack celebrate a successful outcome (and an engagement) with a tinkle on the ivories while they plan their next move:

We’re all alone, no chaperone ♪ ♪ Can get our number ♪ ♪ The world’s in slumber ♪ ♪ Let’s misbehave

There’s something wild about you, child ♪ ♪ That’s so contagious ♪ ♪ Let’s be outrageous ♪ ♪ Let’s misbehave

You know my heart is true ♪ ♪ And you say you for me care ♪ ♪ Somebody’s sure to tell ♪ ♪ But what the heck do we care?

They say that bears have love affairs and even camels ♪ ♪ We’re merely mammals ♪ ♪ Let’s misbehave ♪ ♪ We’re merely mammals ♪ ♪ Let’s misbehave

Why the fuck should I matter to anyone?
Oh, please! You’ve got over 7 bilion other people here…
All more interesting, more inteligent and (not to mention) more good looking, more talented and so on.
Don’t ever claim like I am important and the life won’t
be the same if I was gone. The sun will stil shine and Earth will still spin around.