giant squid monster

*IMAGE NOT MINE*

LUSCA

Lusca is a fascinating cryptid. It it said to dwell in the blue holes of the Bahamas. Still and tranquil pools of blue but home to the most sinister of cryptids, Lusca. Some say Lusca is part shark-part octoptus. 

Some eye-witnesses say Lusca is around 200ft in length. Although there have been few survivors. 

The Island of Andros in the Bahamas is home to many of these blue holes and curious people have tested out a theory that they all connect to each other deep under the sea by using dyes. This means that Lusca may not be in one hole at one time, it can travel. 

For me this is one of the most terrifying of cryptids, able the strike from great depths and in complete silence, you never really know when Lusca may be coming for you. 

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Nothing to see here, folks! Just your everyday average gigantic dead sea monster washing ashore in Indonesia, turning the water red with its icor and reminding us of the vast unknowable depths that surround us filled with living nightmares - some of which are apparently bigger than this thing because it looks like it lost a fight. Anyway, have fun at the beach!

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The Real Kraken

For centuries stories of a beast roaming the ocean depths that could take down entire ships were told by many who lived a life on the sea. Stories described a giant octopus-like creature who’s tentacles could wrap around an entire ship and drag it to the depths with ease. It wasn’t until recently that we finally found out what this fearsome creature could be.

Giant squid are quite terrifying to look at, and it’s easy to see how the sighting of such an animal could spawn horrifying stories. Researchers first suspected that there may be some truth to those horror stories after finding giant sucker wounds on whales. After concluding that there may actually be a real life Kraken, biologists and researchers searched the seas for such a creature. The first giant squid was photographed in 2004 by a Japanese research team. Since then we have learned a lot about the species, and how fascinating the animals really are.

Mythological Throwback Thursday: Kraken

It’s Mythological Throwback Thursday! This week we’re cracking the case of one of the most fearsome sea monsters of all time. In the icy waters of the far north, we seek the Kraken!

The Kraken (from the Norwegian word krake, an approximate translation of which would be ‘twisted creature’) is a gargantuan and mysterious aquatic beast. The first clear record we have of this legendary creature is from Örvar-Oddr, a 13th-century Icelandic saga, in which it was referred to as the hafgufa. It is said to be large enough to swallow whales and ships; indeed it was claimed to be possible to sail through its mouth.

Early scientists speculated that the Kraken was incapable of reproduction, for their numbers were so small. Compared to an island in size, it was said that they lured in vast shoals of prey-fish by regurgitating part of their previous meal, and then swallowed them up. Eugh. This disgusting tendency was nevertheless also a lure for fishermen, who sought the bounteous hauls of such a swarming.

Tales of the Kraken may have been influenced by the story of the Greek sea monster, Charybdis. Both creatures are told to generate vicious whirlpools that could easily sink ships, and both have gigantic, monstrous forms and appetites.

Norwegian Erik Pontoppidan, 18th-century bishop of Bergen, said that the Kraken could pull down even the largest warship with its tentacles. The consensus among 18th-century investigators was that it was a type of gigantic cephalopod, a colossal octopus or squid, but earlier descriptions pitched it as more of a crab-like or whale-like being.

Tales of gigantic sea monsters have petered out as we have learned more about the ocean depths and the areas in which they might hide from us have shrunk. This hasn’t diminished their presence in fiction though: the Kraken had a prominent role in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, and features in works by Tennyson, Melville, Jules Verne and China Miéville. As a mysterious, powerful and deadly being of alien intelligence and shape, it seems the appeal of the Kraken will not soon disappear to the depths…

Thanks for taking the plunge with us! We look forward to seeing you again next week for another Mythological Throwback Thursday!

Mythological Throwback Thursday: Kraken

It’s Mythological Throwback Thursday! This week we’re cracking the case of one of the most fearsome sea monsters of all time. In the icy waters of the far north, we seek the Kraken!

The Kraken (from the Norwegian word krake, an approximate translation of which would be ‘twisted creature’) is a gargantuan and mysterious aquatic beast. The first clear record we have of this legendary creature is from Örvar-Oddr, a 13th-century Icelandic saga, in which it was referred to as the hafgufa. It is said to be large enough to swallow whales and ships; indeed it was claimed to be possible to sail through its mouth.

Early scientists speculated that the Kraken was incapable of reproduction, for their numbers were so small. Compared to an island in size, it was said that they lured in vast shoals of prey-fish by regurgitating part of their previous meal, then swallowing them up. Eugh. This disgusting tendency was nevertheless also a lure for fishermen, who sought the bounteous hauls of such a swarming.

Tales of the Kraken may have been influenced by the story of the Greek sea monster, Charybdis. Both creatures are told to generate vicious whirlpools that could easily sink ships, and both have gigantic, monstrous forms and appetites.

Norwegian Erik Pontoppidan, 18th-century bishop of Bergen, said that the Kraken could pull down even the largest warship with its tentacles. The consensus among 18th-century investigators was that it was a type of gigantic cephalopod, a colossal octopus or squid, but earlier descriptions pitched it as more of a crab-like or whale-like being.

Tales of gigantic sea monsters have petered out as we have learned more about the ocean depths and the areas in which they might hide from us have shrunk. This hasn’t diminished their presence in fiction though: the Kraken had a prominent role in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, and features in works by Tennyson, Melville, Jules Verne and China Miéville. As a mysterious, powerful and deadly being, it seems the appeal of the Kraken will not soon disappear to the depths…

Thanks for taking the plunge with us! We look forward to seeing you again next week for another Mythological Throwback Thursday!

Puzzles, Promises, and Paws

(Unfinished Sterek fic with Fox!Stiles. I used elements of this in a different fic in the end, so this one became abandoned.)
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Typical. It’s just typical.

When things happen around Stiles, they usually happen in tandem. One thing leads to another thing, that leads to something else, that leads to another really big, annoying thing that Stiles does not want to deal with. Basically, his life is one big Rube Goldberg Machine with twenty different parts all smashing into each other in a very Mouse-Trap-esk way that usually ends with him—the mouse—trapped under a plastic net.

Or, you know, locked up with chains in yet another creepy basement.

Is it weird that he’s glad it’s witches instead of crazy Hunters this time?

“This is really, super pointless, you know.”

The witches look up from their witchy-muttering and scowl without comment. Yes, this is about the tenth time he’s managed to catch their attention by saying just about the same thing. He actually has no clue why they even bother looking up anymore, but it’s funny and maybe delaying his inevitable death.

“You’re not going to get any information from me,” he says, trying a different track.

One of the older witches sighs, dropping her head down like she just can’t.

“I am starting to think we have made a mistake,” she murmurs to the others, sending the younger three into a babble of promises about how they did get it right, the boy is just being difficult. Which, hell yeah he’s being difficult, theirs a bunch of witches being creepy in a basement with him.

The eldest, not looking convinced at all, gestures to Stiles with clear distaste, “He has not accepted the craft into his bosom.”

“Whoooaa… ” Stiles shakes his head. “Whoa—okay, no, you’re right, I have not. For one thing, I don’t have bosoms to accept crafts into. For another, i’m not that into pipe cleaners and glitter glue, so, you know.”

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