giant birds!

769: Mothman

It’s really no surprise they’re mentioned so often, gotta be the eyes and a certain lack of humanity in its behavior. It sometimes scares me a little…

Requested by: 
from-mars-to-venus, adventuresoftheawkwardterminallywritingi-am-jaydehappily-a-homosexual

Zone of Fear

10

Jailbot wardens journey yesterday and today :y journeys where I met another robot, another WARDEN!!!! Nostalgia critic! @commanderholly I have found out I’m taller then sardonyx XD controlled team skull! Hanged out with dead pool~ a gingerbread cookie!! BIRD PERSON!!! *explodes* I’m considering drawing these as the characters XD that’ll be really fun!!

The 8 Steps of a CHARACTER ARC

You know that moment as a writer, when you’ve been charging through the story, high on how fantastic it is, and then suddenly…it all STOPS.  The next scene doesn’t form in your head. You’ve got nothing. 

Behind your characters, a string of bright and captivating scenes mark the trail of that rocket of inspiration; ahead of your characters, a foggy expanse, stretching to who-knows-where, a few shapeless blobs that should be scenes floating in the nothingness. The rocket is dead, and not refueling any time soon.

Well, to everybody who’s suffered this, or is currently suffering it, there’s a way to navigate through that fog. A map. Directions and a destination.

Or, more specifically, events that form the underlying structure of the story. 

This post is going to focus on one facet of story structure: character arc. Structure is something people subconsciously recognize and expect, and if the story doesn’t match those expectations, they feel cheated (though usually can’t explain why). Every good story follows a structure. So if you know structure, you’ll always know where to go next, and won’t get lost in the fog. 

So here are the 8 steps of a character arc:

1) Hero: Strength, Weakness, and Need

This happens in the setup of the story, when the main character’s ordinary world is being introduced. First, the main character’s strengths must be displayed; we must be given a reason to like them, or if not exactly “like” them, empathize with them, and be fascinated by them. The reader needs to bond with the character, feel concerned about how it all turns out for them. Or in other words, feel that the main character is worth experiencing the story. There are easy traits that do this: courage, love, humor, being in danger, being unfairly treated, being highly skilled at something, having a powerful noble goal. (Courage is the one they all need. If the character doesn’t have the gumption to actively pursue what they want, they are automatically a background character.) 

After this, still in the beginning of your story, let the character exhibit what needs to change. Show their weaknesses of character and self awareness.
And lastly, hint at what they NEED to learn. Sometimes this is even stated to the character, and they don’t understand it, refuse to believe it, or condemn it. Like “A Christmas Carol”, when Scrooge’s nephew says his speech about Christmas and how wonderful it is, and Scrooge replies “Bah Humbug!" 

2) Desire: This is the moment when the character knows what they need to pursue, in order to obtain what they inwardly want. It is not the inciting incident or catalyst, the event in a story that disrupts the ordinary world and calls the hero on an adventure. This is a separate step entirely, occurring after that catalyst has shattered life as the main character knows it. They believe obtaining this goal will calm whatever inner turmoil or conflict they’re battling. And always, they’re not quite right.
Think of Mr Fredricksen: His goal is to get the house – a  symbolic representation of Ellie and the life he shared with her – to Paradise Falls, which he believes will heal his grief and guilt. It won’t. Once he obtains it, the achievement feels hollow. But I’m getting ahead of myself. So on we go! 

3) Plan: Once in Act Two, the character is going to scramble for a plan of action. The inner want has solidified into a tangible goal, but they need a strategy to achieve it. This also spells out for the reader what to expect in that second act.  

4) Conflict: What’s going to try stopping them? A hero with a goal is one thing, but to make it a story we need something that stands in the way. An obstacle. A force of opposition. If we didn’t have obstacles, books would be as interesting as "Harry Potter and the Trip to the Grocery Store.” (Although honestly, I’d probably read that.) After the catalyst has changed everything, after the character crosses the threshold into Act Two, everything from here on out will be laden with conflict. This is usually when enemies, or more accurately forces of opposition, begin to appear. Everything is accumulating to complicate the main character’s pathway to achieving what they want. The forces of opposition come from not only the villains, but from the actions that have to be taken to achieve the desire. Whatever this action is, it’s exactly what the main character is not suited to do, an action that pressures their flaws, exposes them to exactly what they need to become but can’t right now. 

Like Stitch being forced to be the family dog. He’s not suited to this task.

5) Battle: The forces of opposition are amping up, growing stronger, fighting with greater intensity. The main character is taking the punches and working around them, relentlessly plowing forward. Hero and allies are usually punching back too.

6) Midpoint: This is the event where they first encounter what they need to learn, what they need to become. Something happens that forces them to behave in this new, life-saving way. But once they’ve seen it, they don’t know what to do with this knowledge. 

7) Dark Night, Revelation, Choice:
This is always the darkest point in the story, where all seems lost, and death – of a literal or spiritual nature – is in the air. And in this moment, something usually happens that makes the main character wake up to what is wrong, and what they need. More often than not, this revelation will arrive from the “love story” or relationship of the plot, and will be the thing that helps them pull themselves out of despair and see the light. And once this is uncovered, once the revelation of the truth about themselves is recognized, they are faced with a choice. Of course, they’ve been faced with choices in every beat of every scene, but this is the big choice that is going to determine if their story has a happy ending or a tragic one. The choice is this: “You are being faced the truth that you need to heal. Are you going to choose what you need, let your old self die, and become someone better?” And always, always, always this is a hard choice. The revelation must be significant to them. And it’s never easy. It can’t be. We don’t write stories about heroes who make easy choices. Villains have it easy. Are you going to adopt this new way of living, adopt this truth, and let your old self die? Or are you going to stay the way you are (which feels safer and is much less challenging) but end up stuck in a sort of living death? Most of the time, of course, they choose the right thing. 

This moment is usually always the saddest scene in the thing. Like this scene with Stitch.

8) New Life: This is their changed life. After experiencing the trials of the story, after realizing what they need and choosing to be reborn, they are going to be different people – and are going to live a different life. This is what follows the statement “And every day after …” What has changed? Show the audience how things are different, how things are better, because they want to see that. This is the resolution, the wrapping up of everything we’ve been through with the main character, and having this in the story is often what gives that feeling of satisfaction after seeing a really well-told story. 

So! To show off how this works, I’ve chosen the character arc of Carl from Up. 

1) Hero: Strengths, Weakness, Need

Strengths: Reasons to like Carl are packed into that heartbreaking opening sequence. By the end of it, we love him, love Ellie, and are crying our eyes out.

Weaknesses: Now Carl is curmudgeonly, grumpy, cold, and won’t pay attention to a living soul. He’s also plagued by grief, regret, guilt, and loneliness. (Which we are all 100% okay with, because we already like him.)

Need: He needs Russel. The statement of what he needs to learn isn’t outright said (as it will be later) but Russel represents it. 

Step Two: The catalyst was when a truck knocked down Ellie’s mailbox, Carl hit a construction worker in the head with his cane, and for this a judge declares him a public menace and orders him to go to Shady Oaks Retirement Village. The DESIRE is this moment. 

Carl escapes in a flying house, thousands of balloons lifting him skyward. He even says the desire of the whole story out loud, “So long boys! I’ll send you a postcard from Paradise Falls!” The tangible goal is “live out the rest of his days in his and Ellie’s house, on the edge of Paradise Falls, South America.” (“It’s like America … but South.”)

Step Three: The plan and the conflict overlap, as they are wont to do. We have a scene where Carl is unfurling sails, setting a compass, and settling back in his chair for a smooth journey. But later on, after some conflict has arrived, we have Russel figuring out how to actually make it there. And after even more conflict has arrived, we have him telling Russel “We’re going to walk to the falls quickly and quietly, with no rap music or flash-dancing.”

Step Four: The moment he settles back into his armchair, high above the city, and here’s a knock on the front door, nothing is going to be easy for Carl. First, we have opposition in the form of Russel. Then we have a storm. Then the house lands miles away from the Falls, so they’ll have to walk it. Then we have Kevin, the giant bird. Then we have Dug. Which means they’re also being chased by a legion of talking dogs. Which brings us to Muntz, the main villain, and Carl’s shadow – the representation of Carl’s flaws, and the consequences of refusing to let go of the past. 

Step Five: This is the trek to the Falls. It’s also the battle with every complication that arises. And it’s also exactly what Carl is not suited to do. He’s a curmudgeonly old guy, bent on living out the rest of his life alone. Well, the story says “Nope, Carl, that’s not how it’s going to be” and promptly gives him a surrogate grandson to take care of, a dog who adores him, and even a giant mythical bird. And he has to lead them all, if he’s going to get to the Falls. 

Step Six: The moment when Russel invades Carl’s heart. Which is what he needs, but he doesn’t understand. (I have the scene beated out in the previous post.)

Step Seven: Finally, he gives in to the worst of himself and chooses his goal of living in his broken house on the edge of Paradise Falls. But somehow this doesn’t feel like victory. He’s still alone, next to Ellie’s empty chair, and she is still beyond his reach. 

He picks up her adventure book, and leafs through the photographs, missing her; he pauses on the page scrawled with the words “Stuff I’m Going To Do”, lets his hand rest on it, grief and regret overwhelming him. He begins to close the book, and the page shifts … revealing the edge of another picture. Surprised, he turns the page. It’s their wedding picture.

Ellie added picture after picture of their happy marriage, the whole wonderful life they shared, all the things she did. And on the bottom of the last page is her last message to him: “Thanks for the adventure! Now go have a new one! Love, Ellie.” Exactly what Carl needs. He doesn’t need to be guilty, he doesn’t need to regret the past. The past was beautiful, and she will never truly leave him. 

Choice: So, Carl can make the choice to throw everything out of the house to go save Russel. 

New Life: Sitting on a curb, eating ice cream with Russel.

In the credits, we see a whole new life – or new adventure – with Carl, Russel, Dug, and even a bunch of new puppies.

So, it’s actually pretty simple. And once again, it’s fun to develop your own stories like this, but it’s surprisingly fun to analyze movies and books with it too. It improves your storytelling ability, I’ve found. Practice makes perfect.

I hope this post helps somebody out. It’ll make the ten times I cried while writing it, while watching scenes from Up, worth it.

Recently Extinct Megafauna

Not ‘cavemen hunted these’ recently extinct. Recently extinct as in ‘16 to 20 human generations ago’.

Aurochs

What: The ancestor of domestic cattle

Where: 3 subspecies found throughout Northern Africa, Europe, and India 

When: 1627

Cause: Humans

Fun fact: They were mentioned in the Hebrew bible as re’em and mistranslated in the king James version as unicorns. There are numerous programs to revive the species 

Haast’s Eagle

What: One of the largest flighted bird to have ever lived

Where: New Zealand

When: 1400s

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: It’s been speculated that the ‘giant hawk’ Maui transforms into in Disney’s Moana is a reference to this eagle, which still has cultural significance for the Maori people of NZ, and is known as Pouakai in legends

Quagga

What: Subspecies of plains Zebra

Where: Africa 

When: 1883

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: It was the first extinct animal to have it’s DNA analyzed and there are efforts to revive the species. Though there are some triumphant sounding articles there, true quaggas are not back from the dead. We’re getting close now, and have 6 individuals now classed as ‘Rau quaggas’

Stellar’s Sea Cow

What: Massive sirenian mammal related to the modern dugong

Where: Bering Sea

When: 1768

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: It was declared extinct just 27 years after discovery by Europeans. 

Thylacine

What: Marsupial carnivore

Where: Australia, Tasmania, New Guinea 

When: 1936

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: There are purported sightings more than any other animal on this list. Many people believe this animal might still be out there 

???

Moa 

What: Immense flightless bird

Where: New Zealand

When: By 1445

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: These gigantic birds were the prey of choice for the aforementioned Haast’s eagle. When humans destroyed the Moa population, the eagle was starved out.

Mexican Grizzly Bear

What: Exactly what it’s name suggests

Where: Northern Mexico to southern Arizona and New Mexico

When: 1964

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: Like the Tasmanian tiger this bear might still be out there. The species was declared extinct in the 60′s, however, a brown bear was shot in Sonora in 1976

Elephant bird

What: Gigantic flightless bird

Where: Madagascar

When: By the 1700s

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: They have the largest recorded egg size of any bird, with their eggs weighting up to 22 lbs.

Eastern Elk

What: Large subspecies of elk

Where: Eastern USA

When: The last confirmed eastern elk was shot in 1877

Cause: Bullet (humans)

Fun Fact: This elk could weigh up to about 1,000lbs and could have antlers 6 feet in length. Another subspecies, Merriam’s elk, went extinct around the same time but once lived in southwestern USA.

Koala Lemur

What: Giant lemurs

Where: Madagascar

When: By the 1500s

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: These were relatively human sized lemurs, growing 4-5 feet tall (the average male chimpanzee stands at just under 4 feet)

Japanese Wolves

What: The Hokkaido and Honshu wolves of Japan

Where: Japan

When: By the 1900s

Cause: Humans

Fun Fact: These wolves were purposefully exterminated with mass poisoning efforts by an American hired by the Japanese government. 

* Some of these animals aren’t technically megafauna; I’m being lose with the term. The thylacine is about 30 lbs shy of the marker, the Japanese wolves fall a little short, and Haast’s eagle falls well below. 

** I’ve left out some of the more recent and / or better known animals; I wanted to focus on animals I feel are slipping from general memory. 

*** There are actually several subspecies of Moa, though I’ve lumped them together as they all met the same fate around the same time.

I did some outdoors sketching during a brief glimmer of sunshine, but the on-flowing mysteries past the broad river-bend were barred by a beaked guardian.

Things i love about (book) Stanley Uris

  • He’s fastidious
  • “A creature of habit and convention”
  • “A patient boy”
  • Thinks that birds talk to each other (they totally do stan)
  • Thinks about phrases like ‘weirdsville’ and ‘Creep City’ because Richie says them
  • When the dead boys come for him in the standpipe he defends himself using his bird-book and shouting out the names of birds (it works)
  • Has an adorably dry sense of humour
  • Makes the suggestion to clean up the blood from Beverly’s bathroom (and then pays for the rags to get cleaned and jokes that it was a laundry date)
  • Was offended when he saw the dead boys (which is way worse than being frightened in his eyes)
  • “could stand to be scared, but he hated being dirty”
  • Was the most successful young accountant in Atlanta
  • Played baseball and “had the reflexes of an angel” according to Eddie (and I honestly don’t disbelieve, cause my boy Stan is an angel)
  • Cant think of anyone else to tell about IT because he only trusts the losers
  • Poor kid had his face washed with snow until it bled, by henry bowers
  • Traded funnybooks for firecrackers (him and Richie are meant to be i stg)
  • He can sing (or sayng according too Richie)
  • “Kookie kookie lend me your bones”
  • Sharp minded
  • When Richie tells him 'i heard somewhere that you killed Christ’ Stan replies totally deadpan with 'i think that was my father?’ COMEBACK KING!!
  • Carries his bird book with him (almost) everywhere
  • Jokes about breaking Eddie’s other arm
  • Saves Eddie and Mike in the sewer using his bird book and telling the giant bird he doesn’t believe in it
  • (He does however believe in phoenix’s)
  • He is the one who cuts the rest of the losers palms because he knows that it wasn’t really gone
Fun book facts about Stan Uris
  • He can bust out way funnier shit than Richie without even trying
  • He’s the first to deter It with the power of belief, and this helps inspire the later courses of action The Losers take against It
  • He loves bird-watching, and bonds with his father over it
  • It’s his idea to clean Bev’s bathroom, he actively walks into it and points to where he can see the blood so she knows she’s not crazy, and when they go to the laundromat to wash the rags they used, he insists on paying for it
  • He’s not reluctant to fight It because he’s afraid. At all. It’s a very strange, complex psychological issue related to being very ordered, perceptive of the world, and “adult”, and almost unable to except any of it is real, but it’s not cowardice.
  • He later makes It fuck off when It’s in the form of a giant bird dive-bombing them in the sewers by standing there screaming at It that no bird like that has ever existed and he doesn’t believe in It, then brushes it off with humility when the other Losers tell him he kicked ass
  • He’s implied to have a better understanding of It than the other Losers did for some reason, intermittent memories of their encounter even before Mike calls, and is theorized to have realized It was pregnant. This is implied to be why he commits suicide rather than go back to face It. He also displays some kind of sense of precognition
  • The chapter of his suicide is told from his wife’s PoV, and paints him as extremely kind, supportive, and loving
  • It was his idea to swear the blood oath in the first place, not Bill’s, and he cuts everyone’s palms (before briefly making a “joke” about slashing his wrists with the piece of broken bottle, which disturbs Bill so much that he almost makes a move on him because he seemed serious)
  • He’s the best love him god damn it

a not-entirely-earthling stinky boy