ghouta

4

/pol/ analyzes a newly posted Ahrar al-Sham (Islamic Front) propaganda video originating out of the 15km wide Eastern Ghouta pocket of Damascus, a rebel strong hold.  Ahrar al-sham has killed and captured christians and shiite civilians in areas of their control.

The posters in the thread made a scavenger hunt of it and broke the entire territory up into a grid for participants to claim a quadrant and scour their respective area on satellite map programs to try and connect the surroundings in the video to it’s corresponding overhead view.

Eventually, someone successfully identifies the location and the coordinates are forwarded to Syrian loyalist forces for aerial bombardment.

>tfw 4chan is a faction in the Syrian Civil War

SYRIA. Rif Dimashq governorate. Arbin. March 3, 2017. Mohamed Ataya, a 31-year-old Syrian man known as “Abu Maher”, tends to his plants on the rooftop of his damaged building in the eastern Ghouta region on the outskirts of the capital. Ataya, who used to be a professional football player before the war, cultivates seeds for sale.

Photograph: Amer Almohibany/AFP/Getty

Ramadan celebrations around the world

The holy month of Ramadan started on Saturday, May 27, as Muslims all over the world are began their monthlong daytime religious fast.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the 12-month Islamic calendar. It is celebrated by observing a fast every day that begins after a predawn meal, suhur, and is broken with iftar, a meal at sunset.

Here’s a look at vibrant pictures of Ramadan being celebrated around the world. (Yahoo India)

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Tumblr.

Queens, New York

A Shiite Muslim man enters the Hussainiya prayer room during the month of Ramadan at the Al-Khoei Foundation in Jamaica, Queens, New York, May 29, 2017. (Amr Alfiky/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Ghouta, Syria

A man reads the Koran during Ramadan in the rebel-held eastern Damascus suburb of Ghouta, Syria, May 27, 2017. (Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Tehran, Iran

A Shiite Muslim girl arrives at Imamzadeh Saleh mosque in Tajrish Square in northern Tehran on May 30, 2017, during the holy fasting month of Ramadan. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Hyderabad, India

An Indian Muslim offers prayers before breaking his fast on the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at Mecca Masjid in Hyderabad, India, May 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Muslims break their fast with iftar during the holy month of Ramadan on May 29, 2017, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Francois Nel/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Peshawar, Pakistan

A Muslim man prays as he prepares to break the fast on the first day of the holy month of Ramadan in Peshawar, Pakistan, May 27, 2017. (Fayaz Aziz/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Singapore

Muslims perform tarawih prayers to mark the start of Ramadan at a mosque in Singapore, May 26, 2017. (Edgar Su/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Gaza City, Gaza

A Palestinian man reads verses of the Quran, Islam’s holy book, during the month of Ramadan at al-Omari mosque in Gaza City, Monday, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Jerusalem

A Palestinian man reads the Quran in al-Aqsa Mosque, on the compound known to Muslims as al-Haram al-Sharif and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City during the holy month of Ramadan, May 28, 2017. (Ammar Awad/Reurters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Delhi, India

A Muslim man distributes free iftar (breaking of fast) meals as charity on the first day of Ramadan at the Jama Masjid (Grand Mosque) in the old quarters of Delhi, India, May 28, 2017. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Istanbul, Turkey

A Turkish army artillery unit marks the end of fasting in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Turkey, May 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A Muslim woman prays after having her iftar (breaking fast) meal on the first day of Ramadan at the Jama Masjid (Grand Mosque) in the old quarters of Delhi, India, May 28, 2017. (Adnan Abidi/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man in Ottoman attire poses for pictures as people break their fast in the historic Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, Turkey, May 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Manhattan, New York

Egyptian-American Muslim family membres pray the Maghrib prayer on the first day of Ramadan in Manhattan, May 27, 2017. (Gabriela Bhaskar/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Washington Square Arch is seen on the left as Muslim women praying Tarawih prayers are reflected in the window of the Islamic Center at New York University ahead of Ramadan in Manhattan, New York, May 26, 2017. (Gabriela Bhaskar/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A Palestinian man reads verses of the Quran, Islam’s holy book, during the month of Ramadan at al-Omari mosque in Gaza City, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Jakarta, Indonesia

A whirling dervish performs as Muslim men wait to break their fast at Istiqlal Mosque during the second day of Ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, Sunday, May 28, 2017. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

A man rests as he reads the Quran in a mosque during Ramadan in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, May 29, 2017. (Faisal Al Nasser/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Kashmir, India

Kashmiri Muslims read verses from the Quran, Islam’s holy book, inside the shrine of Shah-e-Hamdan during the holy month of Ramadan in Srinagar, Kashmir, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Brooklyn, New York

Muslims shop for decorations ahead of the first day of Ramadan in Brooklyn, New York, May 26, 2017.
(Amr Alfiky/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Islamabad, Pakistan

A boy learns to read the Quran at a mosque during the holy month of Ramadan, in Islamabad, Pakistan, May 29, 2017. (Faisal Mahmood/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Indonesian Muslims pray on the first day of Ramadan at Istiqlal Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 26, 2017. (Beawiharta/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

An elderly man checks a traditional Ramadan lantern before buying it to mark the holy month of Ramadan at the main market in Gaza City, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Muslims are silhouetted as they scan the horizon for a crescent moon that will determine the beginning of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at a mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A worker decorates the yard of a coffee shop on the main beach road one day ahead of the holy month of Ramadan, in Gaza City, May 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Adel Hana)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Lahore, Pakistan

Workers wash the courtyard of a mosque in preparation for Ramadan in Lahore, Pakistan, May 27, 2017. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

North Sumatra, Indonesia

Students perform a prayer on the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at Ar-Raudlatul Hasanah Islamic boarding school in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, May 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Muslim men pray in a mosque on the third day of Ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A Muslim woman reads the Quran in a mosque on the third day of Ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Kashmiri Muslims read verses from the Quran, Islam’s holy book, inside the shrine of Shah-e-Hamdan during Ramadan in Srinagar, Kashmir, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Mukhtar Khan)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Men reads verses of the Quran, Islam’s holy book, during Laylat al-Qadr prayers during Ramadan at al-)mari mosque in Gaza City, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Hatem Moussa)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Muslims gather at the Badshahi Mosque for the iftar meal during Ramadan in Lahore, Pakistan, May 29, 2017. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Karachi, Pakistan

Commuters travel past plates of food placed for passersby to break their fast during Ramadan in Karachi, Pakistan, May 29, 2017. (Akhtar Soomro/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Ajmer, India

A boy cleans the religious pictures for sale at a shop during Ramadan outside the shrine of Sufi saint Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti in Ajmer, India, May 29, 2017. (Himanshu Sharma/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Karbala, Iraq

Men read the Quran at the Imam Hussein shrine during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in the city of Karbala, Iraq, May 29, 2017. (Stringer/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

SYRIA. Rif Dimashq governorate. Douma. December 13, 2015. The body of a dead man is seen next to blood stains at a field hospital, after what activists said were air and missile strikes.

Bassam Khabieh of Reuters won the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise.” His Field Hospital Damascus put into perspective the tremendous danger and difficulty of being a photojournalist in current-day Syria, one of the most hostile and unpredictable environments on the planet.

Photograph: Bassam Khabieh/Reuters

SYRIA. Rif Dimashq governorate. Douma. December 5, 2015. An injured boy undergoing surgery, after he was injured in what activists said was an airstrike by forces loyal to Syria’s president Bashar al-Assad, rests inside a field hospital.

Bassam Khabieh of Reuters won the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for “photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise.” His Field Hospital Damascus puts into perspective the tremendous danger and difficulty of being a photojournalist in current-day Syria, one of the most hostile and unpredictable environments on the planet.

Photograph: Bassam Khabieh/Reuters

time.com
Chemical attack in Syria kills 22 members of a single family
The Alyousef family, one of Khan Sheikhoun's main clans, was hardest hit.
By Sarah El Deeb / AP

The grief-stricken father cradled his 9-month-old twins, Aya and Ahmed, each in the crook of an arm. Stroking their hair, he choked back tears, mumbling, “Say goodbye, baby, say goodbye” to their lifeless bodies.

Then Abdel Hameed Alyousef took them to a mass grave where 22 members of his family were being buried. Each branch of the clan got its own trench.

More than 80 people, including at least 30 children and 20 women, were killed in the chemical attack on the Syrian town of Khan Sheikhoun early Tuesday, and the toll could still rise. The Alyousef family, one of the town’s main clans, was hardest hit.

Another member of the family, Aya Fadl, recalled running from her house with her 20-month-old son in her arms, thinking she could find safety from the toxic gas in the street. Instead, the 25-year-old English teacher was confronted face to face with the horror of it: A pick-up truck piled with the bodies of the dead, including many of her own relatives and students.

“Ammar, Aya, Mohammed, Ahmad, I love you my birds. Really they were like birds. Aunt Sana, Uncle Yasser, Abdul-Kareem, please hear me,” Fadl said, choking back tears as she recalled how she said farewell to her relatives in the pile.

“I saw them. They were dead. All are dead now.”

The tragedy has devastated the small town. It also deepened the frustration felt by many Syrians in opposition-held areas that such scenes of mass death, which have become routine in the country’s 6-year-old civil war, bring no retribution or even determination of responsibility.

The U.S. and other Western countries accused President Bashar Assad of being behind the attack, while Syria and its main backer, Russia, denied it. Despite world condemnation, bringing justice is difficult in the absence of independent investigation of Syria’s chemical arsenal, which the government insists it has destroyed.

“My heart is broken. Everything was terrible. Everyone was crying and couldn’t breathe,” Fadl told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “We had many circumstances in Syria and we had many difficult situations. This is the most difficult and most harmful situation I ever had.”

In 2013, horrific scenes of Syrians flooding hospitals or found dead in their homes after a sarin gas attack that killed hundreds in the rebel-held Damascus suburb of Ghouta provoked international condemnation. A Russian-brokered deal followed allowing Assad to declare he has destroyed his chemical stockpile and joined the Chemical Weapons Convention.

But a year later, chlorine gas attacks became recurrent, killing scores of people.

However, Tuesday’s massacre was not caused by chlorine, an irritant with limited ability to kill. The high number of casualties, as well as the grave symptoms including convulsions, constricted pupils and vomiting point to a more complex chemical gas.

A Doctors Without Borders medical team that examined a number of victims in a hospital near the border with Turkey said the symptoms are consistent with exposure to a neurotoxic agent— at least two different chemical agents. The U.S.’s early assessment is that it involved the use of chlorine and sarin, according to two U.S. officials who weren’t authorized to speak publicly on the matter and demanded anonymity.

In Khan Sheikhoun, the tragedy was compounded because so many victims were from a single extended family, the Alyousef clan.

Witnesses say four rockets hit around 6:30 a.m. Tuesday, smashing a crater in the ground, but causing minimal structural damage. It quickly became clear this was not a conventional attack.

Alaa Alyousef said his family was sleeping and woke to the sound of the impact only a few hundred yards (meters) away. The first thing they saw was smoke. His father went outside then rushed back in. He had seen a woman walking near the strike suddenly collapse. The family frantically closed windows and dampened cloths with water and apple vinegar to put over their faces.

They were lucky, the wind went in the other direction, Alyousef said.

The rockets hit on the edge of North Harah, a district where much of the Alyousef clan lives. Frantically the clan’s members and their neighbors fled, running from house to house trying to track down relatives.

Fadl remembered her panic when the rockets woke her.

“My husband, where are you? Oh, where are you my lovely son?” she recalled calling out. “They were next to me but I couldn’t see them.” She said their eyes began hurting. “The air became very heavy. There was no bad smell. But the air was so heavy to breathe.”

The Alyousefs brought their dead to a family member’s home that was outside the worst attack area. The courtyard was turned into a makeshift morgue where surviving relatives tried for hours to resuscitate loved ones already dead.

That’s when Fadl finally collapsed, she said, only to wake up in a medical center.

While Fadl recovers along with her son at her parents’ home in a town north of Khan Sheikoun, her husband is still looking for survivors from his extended family.

Alaa Alyousef said not all homes have been searched for survivors yet.

“We are still in shock, a big shock. Our family is devastated,” the 27-year-old said. “Many are still missing. We are afraid to enter homes sometimes lest we find more people dead.”

On Tuesday, he and other family members buried the clan’s dead in the mass grave.

On the way to the grave, Abdel Hameed Alyousef asked a cousin to video his farewell to his twin son and daughter as he sat in the front seat of a van being loaded with bodies.

When the airstrikes hit, he was with the twins. “I carried them outside the house with their mother,” the 29-year-old shop owner told the AP. “They were conscious at first, but 10 minutes later we could smell the odor.”

The twins and his wife, Dalal Ahmed, fell sick.

He brought them to paramedics and, thinking they would be OK, went to look for the rest of his family. He found the bodies of two of his brothers, two nephews and a niece, as well as neighbors and friends. “I couldn’t save anyone. They’re all dead now,” he said.

It was only later that his relatives could bring themselves to tell him that his children and wife had also died.

“Abdel Hameed is in very bad shape,” said his cousin, Alaa Alyousef. He’s being treated for exposure to the toxin, “but he’s especially broken down over his massive loss.”

President Bashar Al Assad checking the damage done by extremists in Maaloula which was liberated few days before Easter. Coincidence? I don’t think so.

Al Qalamoon front is now almost fully liberated and the borders with Lebanon are completely secured. This means no more fighters coming from Lebanon, and no more suicide attacks in both Syria, and Lebanon. Also, the western side of Damascus is now besieged and terrorists inside Ghouta (outskirts of Damascus) have no supply lines anymore. Thanks to Syrian Arab Army backed by the brave Hezbollah fighters.

If it was Maaoula on Easter, could it be Aleppo on Ramadan? Who knows. All we can say is inshalla.