2

The angst-ridden cartoons of Daniel Clowes have been the basis of two feature films: Ghost World in 2001 and Art School Confidential in 2006. Now comes Wilson, which Clowes adapted from his book of comics about a middle-aged misanthrope, played onscreen by Woody Harrelson. The film also stars Laura Dern and Judy Greer. Critic David Edelstein says:

“The question about Wilson the movie is, ‘Will you enjoy spending time with such an abrasive protagonist?’ I did. I was predisposed by my love of Daniel Clowes’s graphic novel, a series of one-page, old-fashioned comic strips like Peanuts, the difference being the main character’s foul temperament and language. Clowes wrote the screenplay and was smart enough to fill out other characters and provide a fairly strong narrative: After Wilson’s father dies without ever giving his son what Wilson craves—unconditional love—Wilson discovers that the child he thought his ex-wife aborted was put up for adoption. She lives, she’s 16, and Wilson wants to find her.”

10

1. Bande à part (1964) directed by Jean-Luc Godard
2. Chungking Express (1994) directed by Wong Kar-wai
3. Pola X (1999) directed by Leos Carax
4. In the Mood for Love (2000) directed by Wong Kar-wai
5. Ghost World (2001) directed by Terry Zwigoff
6. Amélie (2001) directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet
7. The Dreamers (2003) directed by Bernardo Bertolucci
8. Sympathy for Lady Vengeance (2005) directed by Park Chan-wook
9. The Fall (2006) directed by Tarsem Singh
10. La belle personne (2008) directed Christophe Honoré

5

Ghost World (2001) - Terry Zwigoff

5 bullets on this film:

  • Let me start this by saying that Ghost World is technically a comedy movie, but it was probably one of the most depressing things I’ve ever seen. Not that it wasn’t good, but it left feeling kind of empty and sad.  Of course there are some ‘funny’ scenes, but the plot is really dark and real. 
  • Steve Buscemi freaks me out but I really liked him in this. Scarlett Johansson is also great, but Thora Birch is like incredible. By the way, where are you, Thora Birch? 
  • It’s one of those films you can watch over and over again and you’ll never get tired of it, because the soundtrack is good, the cinematography is VERY appealing, and you always end up noticing a new detail. 
  • Let’s take a moment to talk about the character development of this movie. All of the characters have a defined personality and a backstory, so they feel very real. You don’t really like them, because they’re imperfect, but then you end up identifying to them, and that’s one of the reasons this movie is so nice.
  • One of the movie’s main ‘targets’ is to show the two sides of growing up: you can be yourself, or you can change your personality in order to fit in, and that’s reality, that’s why this is one of the best coming of age films. The two main protagonists represent different ways of dealing with adulthood, so if you’re about to ‘start your life and become an active member of society’ (like me), watch this movie because it can help you decide what to do with your life.