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Twenty-five years ago this week, four Los Angeles policemen — three of them white — were acquitted of the savage beating of Rodney King, an African-American man. Caught on camera by a bystander, graphic video of the attack was broadcast into homes across the nation and worldwide.

Fury over the acquittal — stoked by years of racial and economic inequality in the city — spilled over into the streets, resulting in five days of rioting in Los Angeles. It ignited a national conversation about racial and economic disparity and police use of force that continues today.

“When the verdict came out, it was a stunner for people coast to coast. My jaw dropped,” says Jody David Armour, a criminal justice and law professor at the University of Southern California.

When LA Erupted In Anger: A Look Back At The Rodney King Riots

Photo: Ron Eisenbeg/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

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Top image via Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Sir John Franklin led an ill-fated 1845 expedition of two British crews that vanished while seeking a passage through the ice over the top of the world. For decades, people have searched for some trace of Franklin or his ships, the Erebus and the Terror

Canadian researchers located one of the lost ships in 2014, almost completely intact under the ice – Paul Watson writes about the search in his new book Ice Ghosts.

Check out his conversation with Steve Inskeep here.

– Petra

Legendary musician Chuck Berry, who was central to the development of rock and roll beginning in the ‘50s with indelible hits like “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Rock and Roll Music” and “Johnny B. Goode,” died today in St. Charles County, Mo. He was 90 years old. His death was confirmed by the St. Charles County Police department.

Chuck Berry, Legend Of Rock And Roll, Dies At 90

Photo: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

President Trump recently described Frederick Douglass as “an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is being recognized more and more, I notice.” The president’s muddled tense – it came out sounding as if the 19th-century abolitionist were alive with a galloping Twitter following – provoked some mirth on social media. But the spotlight on one of America’s great moral heroes is a welcome one.

Frederick Douglass On How Slave Owners Used Food As A Weapon Of Control

Photo: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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Actor Bob Hoskins Dies At 71

Bob Hoskins was a BAFTA, Emmy and Golden Globe winning actor known for many roles across film and television including The Long Good Friday, Mona Lisa, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Neverland.

English actor Bob Hoskins, 1985. Photo by David Montgomery

Bob Hoskins is seduced by Jessica Rabbit in a scene from the film ‘Who Framed Roger Rabbit’, 1988. Photo by Buena Vista

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In 1976, @npr All Things Considered marked what would have been Malcolm X’s 51st birthday by airing an interview with Alex Haley. Haley, the co-author of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, reflected on Malcolm X’s legacy 11 years after his assassination and the emergence of local and regional black leaders in America. “The country, in this regard, is beginning to become more nearly what it has long said it is—a democracy.”

Take a listen as one stalwart of black history remembers another.

Image 1: Malcolm X poses for a portrait on February 16, 1965. Credit: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Image 2: Alex Haley, co-author of ‘The Autobiography of Malcolm X’ and author of the multi-award-winning family saga 'Roots’. Credit:  Fred Mott/Getty Images

It’s gruesome, but from a scientific standpoint, there’s a predictable calculus for when humans and animals go cannibal. That’s according to a new book by vertebrate zoologist Bill Schutt. In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History, Schutt explains that far more humans — and animals — have dipped into the world of cannibalism than you might have imagined.

Cannibalism: It’s ‘Perfectly Natural,’ A New Scientific History Argues

Image: An illustration from 1875 depicts the survivors of the frigate Cospatrick, which caught fire off South Africa’s Cape of Good Hope in November 1874. Of more than 470 people on board, just three ultimately survived, and they were reduced to cannibalism. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Jerusalem. June 9, 1967. In this iconic picture, several Israeli soldiers stand close together in front of the Western, or Wailing, Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem, following its capture from Jordanian rule in the Six-Day War.

Photograph: David Rubinger/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

But before Barack Obama’s political career, he was a community organizer in Chicago, the first black president of the Harvard Law Review and the state director of Illinois Project Vote.

And it was back then — in the 1990s, when Obama was in his late 20s and early 30s — that he first appeared on NPR.

Here are highlights from some of those earliest appearances:

In 1990, Obama was still a student at Harvard Law School and had just become the Harvard Law Review’s first black president when he was interviewed on Morning Edition.

LISTEN: Before Obama Was President, In His Own Words On NPR

Photo: Joe Wrinn/Harvard University/Corbis via Getty Images

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In 1895, celebrated writer Oscar Wilde was convicted of homosexual activity and sentenced to two years in the infamous Reading Gaol. The British prison closed 2013, but it has just reopened for an unusual art exhibition; “Inside” features installations and texts inspired by the prison and Wilde’s experiences there.

Cells where solitary prisoners counted down the days are now filled with art. And every Sunday, a different performer reads Wilde’s De Profundis – the 50,000-word letter he wrote to his lover and betrayer – in front of the original door to Wilde’s cell. Organizers say it wasn’t hard to enlist an A-list cast of readers, including Ralph Fiennes, Ben Whishaw and Patti Smith; all they had to do was reach out to those who’ve cited Wilde as an influence.

Reading Gaol, Where Oscar Wilde Was Imprisoned, Unlocks Its Gates For Art