getoutdoors

It’s National Get Outdoors Day!  Why not celebrate on any of the more than 245 million acres of public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, like the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument in Montana?

The Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument holds a spectacular array of plant life, wildlife, unique geological features, endless recreational opportunities and significant historical and cultural values. The rugged landscape has retained much of its unspoiled character over the centuries and, as a result, offers outstanding opportunities for solitude and dispersed recreation.

The 149-mile Upper Missouri National Wild and Scenic River flows through the monument. The land and the rugged, surrounding uplands (commonly call the Missouri Breaks) are defined in part by their history. The entire region was the homeland and lifeblood of American Indians. The river served as the pathway for Lewis and Clark, then the waterway for steamboats and a drawing card for fur trappers and traders. Later, the river and the Missouri Breaks were sanctuaries for desperados trying to stay a step ahead of the law. The land was also a source of hope and inspiration for several generations of homesteaders. Today the public lands in the monument make a significant contribution to the local lifestyle and the regional economy.

Within the monument you can float the river, fish, hike, hunt, drive for pleasure, find a little solitude, enjoy a sense of exploration or simply marvel at the variety of resources around you. If you cannot float the Upper Missouri or visit the backcountry, you’ll still be able to experience the cultural and natural history of the monument at the Missouri Breaks Interpretive Center at 701 7th Street, Fort Benton, Montana.

For more information, visit on.doi.gov/Mkrw5B

Photos by Bob Wick

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BLM Winter Bucket List #23: Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, for Spectacular Geologic Features and Superbowl 49

This month, Phoenix, Arizona, is a buzz with #superbowl news.  As the state prepares for the big event, we’ll share information about beautiful public lands just outside of the city and others worth a day trip - like Vermilion Cliffs.

Located on the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona, the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre Monument - a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands - is a geologic treasure, containing a variety of diverse landscapes from the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. 

Visitors enjoy scenic views of towering cliffs and deep canyons. The colorful swirls of cross-bedded sandstone in Coyote Buttes are an international hiking destination.  A permit is required for hiking in Coyote Buttes North (the Wave), Coyote Buttes South, and for overnight trips within Paria Canyon. 

Whether you’re heading to the #superbowl or just want an unforgettable outdoor experience, Vermilion Cliffs is a must see! http://bit.ly/vermilioncliffs

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist

We’re stoked to see so many of you getting in2nature this weekend, the hashtag is crazy! SundayFunday guest-a-gram goes to @trailthesun on her hike to the top of King’s Mtn, Oregon. Always stay #in2nature

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THANK YOU

After a wonderful National Public Lands Day weekend, we would like to thank the many volunteers who joined in our efforts to help take care of America’s public lands nationwide. 

Now go enjoy your public lands! Here are some of our favorite fall foliage photos across BLM managed lands. 

We hope your Labor Day Weekend is going something like this! Epic campfire capture by @isaiah_ryan of @tctaylorcatherine deep in the forest. Always stay #in2nature

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Centennial Mountains Wilderness Study Area and ACEC, BLM Montana

This 28,000-acre mountain range, which forms the boundary between southwest Montana and Idaho, is some of southwest Montana’s wildest country. Designated as an Area of Critical Environmental Concern in 2006, it is considered an important corridor for wildlife movement, providing an east-west trending mountain range connecting the Yellowstone Ecosystem with the rest of the northern Rocky Mountains. Abundant wildlife in the Centennial Mountains include moose, elk, deer, wolverines, badgers, black bears, a wide variety of birds, and occasionally wolves and grizzly bears.  

About 60 miles of the 3,100-mile Continental Divide National Scenic Trail runs through the mountain range. Activities include hiking, horseback riding, camping, fishing, wildlife viewing and photography.  

CLICK HERE to plan your visit.

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM