get airborne

Between nearly getting airborne because maintenance won’t fix anything and potentially convincing the store manager on duty that I was hungover, tonight has been one of THOSE nights.

Got acknowledged yesterday by my commander for working hard at the best warrior competition. Ever since then other dudes in the unit have been asking me workout tips and how I train. The coolest moment was when someone asked if I was gonna go special forces. I laughed and said nah, but then actually kinda thought about it for a minute… Maybe I should just say fuck it and be the best I can be. But first, I have to get air assault or airborne school. What I really want most is sniper school, shootings my real passion. So who knows what’s gonna happen, I guess only time will tell.

Ping's Rhapsody

Based on our studies of women’s swing dynamics, we engineered the Rhapsody Series with a lighter overall system mass, higher lofts and optimized lengths. As a result, women will have an easier time getting the ball airborne and hitting it straight, and that’s going to improve performance and inspire confidence. – PING chairman and CEO John Solheim -

Driver
To generate longer drives, the Rhapsody…

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@flyswiss A321 HB-IOC getting airborne from runway 16 at Zürich.

#Swiss #SwissInternational #FlySwiss #Airbus #AirbusA321 #A321 #A320Family #Airline #Airplane #Aircraft #Airport #Plane #Planespotting #Aviation #Avgeek #Avgeeks #Avporn #ZRH #Zurich #ZurichAirport #LSZH #InstagramAviation #InstaAviation #Megaplane

Things not involving cars getting airborne

Though as heavy as the rain was today at Sepang, half amazed nobody flew off track on standing water. Tomorrow won’t be any better—racetime forecast right now (looking at 10 1/2 hours to green as I type this) is an 85% percent chance of rain. Ahh, Malaysia in the springtime.

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super8nate asked:

Hey bro killer blog. Im enlisting in the military next month and I'm thinking marines but Im checking all my options. I definitely want to be infantry and I was wondering how you liked the rangers? They seem like a tough group of guys.

Being a US Army ranger is a great job, although I will say I had a ranger tab, but did not serve in the 75th ranger reg. Being a 75th ranger is even better as you get a lot more high speed training then a regular line infantry guy in both the Army or Marines. I would suggest enlisting in the Army as an 11x ( infantry recruit ) and get 11x option 40 ( airborne / RASP* ranger assessment school ) and get a chance to be a ranger. If you want to enlist into the Marines, i would suggest enlisting for Recon Marines.

Photo by Mattias Klum @mattiasklumofficial together with @monikaklum for @natgeo.
Over the years I have done a lot of challenging (crazy) things to get the relevant pictures needed for my stories. Go to @mattiasklumofficial to see the Borneo rainforest from above. High on that list of seriously taxing undertakings was trying to get a hot air balloon (and pilot K-G Silverstolpe) from Sweden to Danum Valley and to use it for photography and filming over the rainforest in Borneo. Logistically it was hard but that worked out quite nicely. What really was tough was getting the necessary permits to fly. At that point (1995) it was the first time in history that any one attempted to fly a 36 meters (118 ft) tall device over the ancient rainforests of Sabah, Malaysia. It took a number of months of convincing and strategic discussions and much thank’s to our local fixer at the time (#dannychew) we could eventually get airborne and capture unique stills for our @natgeo story and especially soft, gorgeously smooth film sequences on Super 16 film. “Desire is the key to motivation, but it’s the determination and commitment to unrelenting pursuit of your goal - a commitment to excellence - that will enable you to attain the success you seek.” - Mario Andretti
#balloon #danumvalley #borneo #conservation #rainforest #sabah #nikon @natgeo @thephotosociety by natgeo http://ift.tt/1Gbh3VC

#Repost @natgeo with @repostapp.
・・・
Photo by Mattias Klum @mattiasklumofficial together with @monikaklum for @natgeo.
Over the years I have done a lot of challenging (crazy) things to get the relevant pictures needed for my stories. Go to @mattiasklumofficial to see the Borneo rainforest from above. High on that list of seriously taxing undertakings was trying to get a hot air balloon (and pilot K-G Silverstolpe) from Sweden to Danum Valley and to use it for photography and filming over the rainforest in Borneo. Logistically it was hard but that worked out quite nicely. What really was tough was getting the necessary permits to fly. At that point (1995) it was the first time in history that any one attempted to fly a 36 meters (118 ft) tall device over the ancient rainforests of Sabah, Malaysia. It took a number of months of convincing and strategic discussions and much thank’s to our local fixer at the time (#dannychew) we could eventually get airborne and capture unique stills for our @natgeo story and especially soft, gorgeously smooth film sequences on Super 16 film. “Desire is the key to motivation, but it’s the determination and commitment to unrelenting pursuit of your goal - a commitment to excellence - that will enable you to attain the success you seek.” - Mario Andretti
#balloon #danumvalley #borneo #conservation #rainforest #sabah #nikon @natgeo @thephotosociety

When Flying High No Longer Scares Us

For a lot of folks, flying high means freedom from the gravity of fear, a chance to explore the blue vastness of life’s possibilities, to look at clouds from the other side, and to see with heightened awareness a panoramic view of God’s creation…



But for some like me, flying can be a scary proposition. It’s sad that a fear of heights keeps some of us from getting airborne, from fulfilling our dreams and our life’s purpose. Then again, I guess we’re not so much afraid of heights as we are of falling.






These are Stowe Dailey’s opening words to Flying High: A True Story of Shared Inspiration , a book she co-authored with Calvin LeHew.



I’m pulled in from the very beginning. Stowe speaks so honestly about a fear that I recognize within myself, and I immediately connect with her. I trust her to reveal to me the secrets of how to let go of my own fear and fly high.



Over a two-year period, Stowe and her former husband Peter Shockey met with Calvin on Monday mornings to write a book about Calvin’s life — about his successes as a young millionaire and city developer, his failures and crashes, and the faith and spirituality he employed to ride through it all like a winner.



Writing about Calvin’s experiences and his philosophy on how to rise above adversities, Stowe reflected on her own life. Intertwined with Calvin’s stories, she wrote about her own journey - about her hopes and dreams, and about the fears and insecurities that kept preventing her from living the life she was created for.



Then, Stowe was diagnosed with cancer. It brought her tremendous suffering, but it also turned out to be her wake up call. One that helped her to “move through the fear” and find the courage to “fly high.”



"I felt like the sadness that was in me grew into cancer. And said: if you’re not gonna live your life, you’re gonna lose it," Stowe says. "And I got that in such big way."



A Second Chance







I meet with Stowe at the house she and Peter had built together. She still lives on the same gorgeous property south of Nashville, but in a guest house now that she moved into after their amicable divorce.



We sit on a comfortable couch and chat before our interview, and I look around and imagine the scenes from her book. I try to imagine her life in this house, in love with Peter, enjoying motherhood after leaving the pressures of her successful songwriting career. I imagine the girls growing up and Stowe sitting at the desk writing Flying High, playing the upright piano and longing for for her old life of music, but letting fear keep her down in her comfort zone. I recall the passages where Stowe dealt with her cancer diagnosis, and lay in the sun-room thinking she was going to die.



Stowe’s eyes twinkle at me and bring me back from my thoughts. I can see how different she is today, sitting on this couch, than she was when she started writing the book. She is not afraid to be herself. She is transformed. She is at last set free from the fear that if she showed her true self she would be judged, rejected and unloved.



"Fear doesn’t stop us from dying," she says with a radiant smile. "It stops us from living."



I tell her how it seems like she has truly conquered fear. But she corrects me:



'I still experience fear… I keep setting things up for myself to do that seem fearful and then I show up. And I move into them. It's like, feel the fear and do it anyway. So, it's like I just move through it.'






Determined to live, and armed with the prayers and support of her family, Stowe began to recover. She and Calvin finished Flying High, which was now richer with Stowe’s own experience of rising above adversity.



After her surgery, Stowe returned to writing music, co-writing and performing with her long-time friend and fellow songwriter Karen Taylor Good. Humorous, courageous, and above all herself, Stowe inspires thousands of people through her music and talks.



Toward the end of our conversation, Stowe picks up her guitar and sings A Second Chance.



"I got a second chance to laugh and love, to sing and dance.

And oh, I know it’s a sweet and precious gift, a second chance to live.”






As I listen, I feel a deep desire to laugh, love, sing and dance with her. I want to fly high and experience the abandonment and power she talks about. I, too, want to learn to move through fear, letting love and grace carry me through.



I wonder if I should cut my hair into a pixie cut or get a tattoo. I might.



Today I’m making a decision to find enough courage to just show up as I am. Me. No longer letting fear scare me.



As Stowe says, ‘Flying high… it’s not just for the birds and the brave. I believe it’s what we all are meant to do.’






Stowe Dailey is a published songwriter who has co-written with such legends of country music as Garth Brooks and the group Shenandoah. She is a published author and motivational speaker. Stowe and her co-writer Karen Taylor Good have formed the duo StoweGood to share their messages of hope and recovery with the world. Flying High is available on Amazon.com




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AeroMobil plans consumer-ready flying car in 2017, autonomous to follow. lovakian company Aeromobil has already proven that its flying car can slip the bounds of gravity with several functioning prototypes. At SXSW, CEO Juraj Vaculik laid out the business’ next milestones, which includes having a production version on sale in 2017. Two years isn’t very long, and to really work as a flying car, the Aeromobil needs to pass all of the regulatory conditions not just in the air, but on the road too, including crash tests. According to Engadget, the company is still working on a mix of materials that keeps the vehicle light enough to get airborne but strong enough to be safe. Despite its visually interesting design and power folding wings, the Aeromobil is still trapped by some of the inherent problems of a flying car. For example, you would need a pilot’s license to operate one in the air, and there’s the drive to a runway to consider. Also, planes don’t usually come cheap, especially not ones with carbon-fiber bodies. Prices in Europe are likely to be several hundred thousand euros, according to Engadget. Vaculik isn’t letting these problems stop him from dreaming even further into the future, though. He imagines a network of grass runways near highways to pull off and take flight from. Assuming the Aeromobil proves to be a success, the company someday wants to create a four-passenger model with a hybrid drivetrain that would double the current version’s 430-mile range. It would also be capable of fully autonomous flight with no pilot at the controls, which sounds like a seriously lofty goal. Image Credit: AeroMobil Source: http://ift.tt/1MRxohY