geraldine-mccaughrean

It’s true: Everyone needs a reason to stay alive – someone who justifies your existence. Someone who loves you. Not beyond all reason. Just loves you. Even just shows an interest. Even someone who doesn’t exist, or isn’t yours. No, no! They don’t even have to love you! They just have to be there to love! Target for your arrows. Magnetic Pole to drag on your compass needle and stop it spinning and tell you where you’re heading and…Someone to soak up all the yearning. That’s what I think.
—  Geraldine McCaughrean, The White Darkness 
ATTENTION ALL AUDIO LISTENERS!!

My friends at Full Cast Audio (www.fullcastaudio.com) tell me that they’ve been having a one cent sale opportunity this month.  I can’t tell you which of their many fine audio books is on sale for one cent today, or which will be on sale for one cent tomorrow and the day after, etc., but you know Full Cast has a number of my books available, as well as Bruce Coville’s (today’s involves unicorns!), Tim Green’s, Kathe Koja’s, Sid Fleischman’s, Robert A. Heinlein’s, Linda Sue Park’s–why are you still reading?  Go to Full Cast Audio (www.fullcastaudio.com) and check out the sale for yourself!

It’s true: Everyone needs a reason to stay alive – someone who justifies your existence. Someone who loves you. Not beyond all reason. Just loves you. Even just shows an interest. Even someone who doesn’t exist, or isn’t yours. No, no! They don’t even have to love you! They just have to be there to love! Target for your arrows. Magnetic Pole to drag on your compass needle and stop it spinning and tell you where you’re heading and…Someone to soak up all the yearning. That’s what I think.
—  The White Darkness by Geraldine McCaughrean

He has never broken his terrible habit of eavesdropping. So, maybe that wasn’t the rustle of pages you heard while this story lasted, but Peter Pan himself, listening in. In exchanged for a story of yours, he might show you his most prized possession: James Hooks’ map of Neverland.

In exchange for a smile, he may show you Neverland itself.


Peter Pan In Scarlet, Geraldine McCaughrean

The air was crammed with snowflakes–as though a goose-feather pillow had burst. Without the red frock coat, Peter was gibbering cold, and he struggled to pull the white tie from round his throat.

“A match, Ravello. Let us get this fire lit and talk after!” called Curly.

“A match, Ravello. Quickly!” said Tootles. “Aren’t you cold too?”

“What’s the little word that gets things done?” said the Ravelling Man, his voice high and mocking. Then the explorers wanted to send him to Nowhereland and never have to speak to him again.

“Please,” said Wendy coldly.

“Please,” said Curly.

“Please,” said John.

Ravello gave a tug on the rope, and brought the wheeled sea chest back to his feet like a chastened pet. He opened its lid and took out a box of lucifers, shaking it gently: a sound like a baby’s rattle. Only one match left. “Tell me again, what’s the little word?”

“Please!” said Tootles.

“Please!” chorused the Twins.

(“Ah! Now I see!” said Peter to himself, puzzle solved.)

“PLEASE!” said all but Peter.

“WRONG,” said Ravello, striking the match against the stubble of his unshaven jaw. The flare lit up his face. It was a wretched face, scarred by his time in the crocodile, scarred by passing time where no time should have passed. Only the aristocratic tilt of his head and the fire in his bleached-brown eyes proved that Pan’s deadliest foe, Captain James Hook was still living within.

“Let me think now. What is the little word that gets things done? Ah yes. Now I remember….” Then he blew out the match and said,

“DIE!”

—  Geraldine McCaughrean, Peter Pan in Scarlet (2006).
Not everyone can be rich. Not everyone can be strong or clever. Not everyone can be beautiful. But we can all be brave! If we tell ourselves we can do it; if we say to our hearts, “Don’t jump about”; if we carry ourselves like heroes… we can all be brave!
We can all look Danger in the face and be glad to meet it, and draw our swords and say, “Have at you, Danger! You don’t scare me!”
Courage is just there for the taking: you don’t need money to buy it. You don’t need to go to school to learn it! Courage is the thing, isn’t it? […]
All goes if courage goes!
—  Peter PanPeter Pan in Scarlet, Geraldine McCaughrean
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Select scans from Geraldine McCaughrean’s “Blue Moon Mountain,” illustrated by Nicki Palin and Tomislav Tomic.  I LOVE LOVE LOVE the art in this book!  The narrative is intended to be sympathetic to “monsters,” including the mighty Kraken and homely Catoblepas (the little herp-y guy with the butterfly wings and the nice smile).  : 3

Empires rise and fall. The gods, who can see the future, know these things. That is why the gods of Greece gradually shifted ground to the skies over Italy. They came to be known by different names: not Zeus but Jupiter; not Hera but Juno, not winged Hermes but winged Mercury.
—  Romulus and Remus, from Roman Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean

Eighty-Five

As we all know, I love Peter Pan deeply. This is the first (and only) true sequel to J.M. Barrie’s masterpiece, and as such, it is absolutely fantastic. It brings back old villains (and also some not-so-villainous), has some purely terrifying moments, but the imagination is absolutely brilliant. Even the ending was fantastic. Read the original, and then read this one. A delight. And the illustrations are also amazing.

—–

“The product of a contest commissioned by trustees at London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital, owner of the copyright to J.M. Barrie’s original Peter Pan, this authorized sequel largely succeeds in entertaining fans of the classic. Curry offers an easy, comfortable pace and somewhat subdued tone for this outing, seemingly taking great care to introduce listeners to new characters (Fireflyer, a male fairy) and reacquaint them with old ones (Wendy and John Darling, Peter). As the central plot unfolds—a return by the League of Pan to Neverland, and their treasure-hunting adventures there with Peter—Curry particularly delights in giving voice to Ravello, a tattered lion tamer and dramatically obsequious fellow who offers to assist the crew and who has a hilarious, hard-to-place foreign accent. Slightly darker and a bit harder to follow than its predecessor (also new on audio; see notes), McCaughrean’s follow-up, sparked here by Curry’s solid performance—is sure to prove irresistible for many.” - Publishers Weekly