george w. bush presidential library

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The National Archives plays a critical role in the transition from one Presidential administration to another. Two big things are going on during the 75 days between the November election and Inauguration Day: assembling a new administration and winding down and packing up a Presidency that has been in office four or eight years.

Read about what our staff do in “Moving Out, Moving In” in the latest issue of Prologue, the National Archives magazine.

Want more history? You can subscribe to Prologue magazine here: http://1.usa.gov/1Imzl4p.

Photos:

Richard Nixon’s staff moves furniture and materials into the Oval Office on January 20, 1969, as the Nixon administration takes office. (Nixon Library)

Dozens of pallets are loaded onto an airliner destined for the George W. Bush Presidential Materials Project in Dallas, Texas. (George W. Bush Library)

In preparation for the move of Nixon presidential materials, a conservator carefully packs jewelry so that it will not shift during its journey to the Nixon Library in Yorba Linda, California. (National Archives, photo by Angela Drews)

Boxes of records and memorabilia await transport to Little Rock, Arkansas, for eventual storage in the Clinton Presidential Library. (Clinton Library)

Former Presidents compare their libraries like other men compare their, well…I just wonder how LBJ would have handled that.
— 

George W. Bush, at the LBJ Library’s Civil Rights Summit, April 10, 2014

Man, I have to admit that I sure am enjoying George W. Bush more-and-more as a former President – and not just because he is no longer President.

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Our own Archivist of the United States, David S. Ferriero, will introduce President Carter tonight at the Civil Rights Summit in Austin, Texas.

In honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library is hosting the summit on April 8, 9, and 10.

You can watch the panel discussions and keynote address live on their website: http://www.civilrightssummit.org/updates/

The keynote speakers include President Barack Obama and three former Presidents: Jimmy Carter will speak on April 8; Bill Clinton will speak on April 9; and George W. Bush will speak on the evening of April 10.

Learn more about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in our new Google Cultural Institute exhibit, which includes videos, letters, telegrams, meeting minutes, and high resolution photos. 

Image: LBJ signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Serial Number: A1030-17a Date: 08/06/1965. Credit: LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto.

It is always cool to see a gathering of the living Presidents, especially at those rare points in history when there are five members of the fraternity alive and well.

And, if we’re going to be realistic, with the next Presidential Inauguration well over three years away, no more Presidential Library openings on the horizon until Obama leaves office and completes his, and the fact that two of our surviving Presidents will turn 89 years old this year, today’s gathering of Presidents Obama, George W. Bush, Clinton, George H.W. Bush, and Carter at the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas is likely the last time we will ever see these five Presidents together in public.

They are opening the George W. Bush presidential library to the public on the 10 year anniversary of the “Mission Accomplished” speech, which is either an inside joke or this is some kind of crisis management business school test of the “poop cruise” thesis that Americans really do have very, shockingly short memories.
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— Rachel Maddow

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George W. Bush’s paintings of diplomats are going on display

Mark your calendars, art lovers, and book those tickets to Dallas: former President George W. Bush is making his formal debut as an exhibited painter.

“The Art of Leadership: A President’s Personal Diplomacy” opens this month at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum. The exhibition will feature portraits by “43” of prominent figures such as former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, current Russian President Vladimir Putin and Bush’s father, former U.S. President George H. W. Bush, as well as “artifacts, photographs and personal reflections to help illustrate the stories of relationships formed on the world stage.”

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Join us on Twitter for #AskAnArchivist! Archivists at National Archives locations around the country will be ready to take your questions. 

8 am ET @usnatarchives Tune in as young archivists talk about getting started in an archives career.

9 am ET @congressarchives Hear from archivists in the Center for Legislative Archives.

10 am ET @boston_archives Talk about Federal records in New England.

11 am ET @USNatArchives Ask your questions about Declassification.

11 am ET @FDRLibrary Talk about working in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library.

NOON ET @usnatarchives Special video chat!!! Ask archivist Alex Champion your questions and he’ll answer on video. 

Noon ET @CarterLibrary Ask questions about President Carter and his Library.

1 pm ET @USNatArchives Tune in as archivist Alan Walker takes over.

2 pm ET @TrumanLibrary @LBJLibrary @HooverPresLib @JFKLibrary Chat with archivists from these four Presidential libraries.

3 pm ET @Bush41Library Learn about the archives of the George H. W.  Bush Presidential Library.

4 pm ET @StLouisArchives Ask questions about military personnel data records.

5 pm ET @StLouisArchives Chat about Civilian Official Personnel Folders.

6 pm ET @NixonLibrary Talk to Carla Braswell about all things Nixon.

In the Museum: While addressing rescue and recovery workers atop a pile of debris on September 14, 2001, President George W. Bush heard a man in the crowd shout, “I can’t hear you!” President Bush used this bullhorn to respond, “I can hear you! The rest of the world hears you! And the people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon!”

The bullhorn was on display in the 9/11 Museum from May to July 2014, on loan from the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas.

Happy #AskAnArchivist Day! And Happy #ArchivesMonth, too!

Join us on Twitter as archivists at National Archives locations around the country will be ready to take your questions.

8 am ET @usnatarchives Tune in as young archivists talk about getting started in an archives career.

9 am ET @congressarchives Hear from archivists in the Center for Legislative Archives.

10 am ET @boston_archives Talk about Federal records in New England.

11 am ET @USNatArchives Ask your questions about Declassification.

11 am ET @FDRLibrary Talk about working in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library.

NOON ET @usnatarchives Special video chat!!! Ask archivist Alex Champion your questions and he’ll answer on video.

Noon ET @CarterLibrary Ask questions about President Carter and his Library.

1 pm ET @USNatArchives Tune in as archivist Alan Walker takes over.

2 pm ET @TrumanLibrary @LBJLibrary @HooverPresLib @JFKLibrary Chat with archivists from these four Presidential libraries.

3 pm ET @Bush41Library Learn about the archives of the George H. W.  Bush Presidential Library.

4 pm ET @StLouisArchives Ask questions about military personnel data records.

5 pm ET @StLouisArchives Chat about Civilian Official Personnel Folders.

6 pm ET @NixonLibrary Talk to Carla Braswell about all things Nixon.