geoff run

Superman Starter Pack

First and most importantly, before we go into petty commercial concerns, let’s remember the meaning of this day. Because friends, this is no ordinary day: this is Miracle Monday, the anniversary of Superman triumphing over no less than the biblical prince of darkness himself (or at least a respectable substitute), and it was so awesome that even though it was expunged from humanity’s collective consciousness, they still instinctively recognized the third Monday of May as a day of good cheer to be celebrated in Superman’s honor from now until the end of time.

I know I write plenty about Superman on here, but with as much as a pain as comics can be to get into, I’m sure at least some of those I’m lucky enough to have follow me haven’t been able to find an easy in for the character. Or maybe a follower-of-a-follower or friend-of-a-friend is looking for a reasonable place to start. So in the spirit of the season, I’ll toss on the (admittedly already pretty massive) pile of recommended starting points on Superman: ten stories in a recommended - but by no means strict - order that should, as a whole, give you a pretty decent idea of what Superman’s deal is and why you should care, all of which you should be able to find pretty easily on Comixology or a local bookstore/comic book shop. I’ll probably do a companion to this in September for Batman Day.

1. Superman: Birthright

What it’s about: It’s his origin. He gets rocketed to Earth from the doomed planet Krypton, he gets raised by farmers, he puts on tights to fight crime, he meets Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, he deals with Kryptonite, all the standard-issue Superman business.

Why you should read it: It does all that stuff better than anyone else. He’s had a few different takes on his origins over the years due to a series of reboots, another of those tellings is even further down the list, but the first major modern one pretty much hit the nail on the head first try. It toes the tricky line of humanizing him without making you forget that hey, he’s Superman, it’s high-action fun without skimping on the character, and if there’s any one story that does the best job of conveying why you should look at an invincible man-god all but beyond sin or death with no major inciting incident in his background as a likable, relatable character, this is it. Add in some of the best Lane and Luthor material out there, and it’s a no-brainer.

Further recommendations if you liked it: About a decade before writing Birthright, its author Mark Waid worked with Alex Ross on what ended up one of DC’s biggest comics ever, Kingdom Come, the story of a brutal near-future of out-of-control superheroes that ultimately narrowed down to being about Superman above all else, and one of his most popular and influential stories of all time at that. Years after Birthright he created Irredeemable, the story of a Superman pastiche named Plutonian gone murderously rogue and how he reached his breaking point, illustrating a lot of what makes Superman special by way of contrast.

(Since Superman’s had so many notable homage/analogue/pastiche/rip-off/whatever-you-want-to-call-it characters compared to other superheroes, often in very good stories, there’ll be a number of those stories on this list.)

2. Superman: Up, Up and Away

What: Ever seen Superman Returns? That, but good. Clark Kent’s been living and loving a normal life as a reporter and husband after a cosmic dust-up in one of DC’s event comics took Superman off the board for a year, but mounting threats demand his return to save Metropolis again, if he still can.

Why: If you’d rather skip the origin, this is as a good a place as you’ll find to jump onboard. Clark and Lois both get some solid characterization, a number of classic villains have solid screentime, there’s some interesting Kryptonian mythology sticking its head in without being too intrusive, a great overarching threat to Metropolis, and it captures how Superman’s powers work in a visceral sense better than almost anything else. If you just want a classic, pick-it-up-and-go Fun Superman Story, this is where to go.

Recommendations: If you liked this, you’ll probably be inclined to enjoy the rest of co-writer Geoff Johns’ run on Action Comics, including most popularly Legion of Superheroes and Brainiac, both with artist Gary Frank. Another series tapping into that classic Superman feeling pretty well - regardless of whether you enjoyed the original show or not - is Smallville: Season 11, showing the adventures of that series’ young Clark Kent once he finally becomes Superman. Currently, Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s run on the main Superman title under the banner of DC Rebirth is maintaining that feeling itself, properly introducing Jon Kent, Lois and Clark’s 10-year-old-son, as Superboy in what seems to be a permanent addition to the cast and mythology (though there’s some continuity hiccups there, even as they’re mostly kept to the background - for the first 20 issues Superman is a refugee from a previous continuity, don’t ask).

3. Superman: Secret Identity

What: He’s Clark Kent, an aspiring writer from a farm town in Kansas. Problem is he’s only named after the other guy, an ordinary teenager who’s put up with crap his whole life for being named after a comic book character in an ordinary world. But when he suddenly finds himself far closer to his namesake than he ever would have imagined, it becomes the journey of his life to find how to really be a Superman.

Why: The best ‘realistic’ Superman story by a long shot, this doesn’t sideline its heart in favor of pseudo-science justifications for what he can do, or the sociopolitical impact of his existence. He has the powers, he wears the costume to save people (though he never directly reveals himself to the world), and in-between he lives his life and learns what it means to be a good man. It’s quiet and sweet and deeply human, and probably one of the two or three best Superman comics period.

Recommendations: Superman: American Alien is probably as close as there’s been to taking this kind of approach to the ‘real’ Superman, showing seemingly minor and unconnected snippets from his life, from childhood to his early days in the costume, and how they unconsciously shaped him into the man he becomes. If you like the low-key, pastoral aesthetic, you might enjoy Superman for All Seasons, or the current title Supergirl: Being Super. If you’d like more of writer Kurt Busiek’s work, his much-beloved series Astro City - focusing on a different perspective in the superhero-stuffed metropolis in every story - opens with A Dream of Flying, set from the point of view of the Superman-like Samaritan, telling of his quiet sorrow of never being to fly simply for its own sake in a world of dangers demanding his attention.

4. Of Thee I Sing

What: Gotham hitman Tommy Monaghan heads to the roof of Noonan’s bar for a smoke. Superman happens to be there at the time. They talk.

Why: A lot of people call this the best Superman story of the 90s, and they’re not wrong. Writer Garth Ennis doesn’t make any bones about hating the superhero genre in general (as evidenced by their treatment in the rest of Hitman), but he has a sincere soft spot for Superman as an ideal of what we - and specifically Americans - are supposed to be, and he pours it all out here in a story of what it means for Superman to fail, and why he remains Superman regardless. It sells the idea that an unrepentant killer - even one only targeting ‘bad guys’ like Tommy - would unabashedly consider Superman his hero, and that’s no small feat.

Recommendations: If you read Hitman #34 and love it but don’t intend to check out the rest of the series (why? It’s amazing), go ahead and read JLA/Hitman, a coda to the book showing the one time Tommy got caught up in the Justice League’s orbit, and what happens when Superman learns the truth about his profession, culminating in a scene that sums up What Superman Is All About better than maybe any other story. If you appreciated the idea of a classically decent Superman in an indecent world, you might enjoy Al Ewing’s novel Gods of Manhattan (the middle of a loose pulp adventure trilogy with El Sombra and Pax Omega, which I’ve discussed in the past), starring Doc Savage and Superman analogue Doc Thunder warring with a fascistic new vigilante in a far different New York City.

5. Superman: Camelot Falls

What: On top of a number of other threats hitting Superman from all sides, he receives a prophecy from the wizard Arion, warning of a devastating future when mankind is faced with its ultimate threat; a threat it will be too weak to overcome due to Superman’s protection over the years, but will still only just barely survive without him. Will he abandon humanity to a new age of darkness, or try and fight fate to save them knowing it could lead to their ultimate extinction?

Why: From the writer of Secret Identity and co-writer of Up, Up and Away!, this is probably the best crack at the often-attempted “Would having Superman be around actually be a good thing for humanity in the long term?” story. Beyond having the courtesy of wrapping that idea up in a really solid adventure rather than having everyone solemnly ruminate for the better part of a year, it comes at it from an angle that doesn’t feel like cheating either logically or in terms of the characters, and it’s an extremely underrated gem.

Recommendations: For the same idea tackled in a very different way, there’s the much better-known Superman: Red Son, showing the hero he would have become growing up in the Soviet Union rather than the United States; going after similar ideas is the heartfelt Superman: Peace on Earth. The rest of Kurt Busiek’s time on the main Superman title was great too, even if this stood easily as the centerpiece; his other trades were Back In Action, Redemption, The Third Kryptonian, and Shadows Linger. Speaking of underrated gems, Gail Simone’s run on Action Comics from around the same time with John Byrne was also great, collected in Strange Attractors. And since the story opens with an excellent one-shot centered around his marriage to Lois, I have to recommend From Krypton With Love if you can track it down in Superman 80-Page Giant #2, and Thom Zahler’s fun Lois-and-Clark style webcomic Love and Capes.

6. Superman Adventures

What: A spinoff of Superman: The Animated Series, this quietly chugged along throughout the latter half of the 90s as the best of the Superman books at the time.

Why: Much as stories defining his character and world are important, the bread and butter of Superman is just regular old fun comics, and there’s no better place to go than here for fans of any and all ages. Almost all of its 66 issues were at least pretty fun, but by far most notable were two runs in particular - Scott McCloud, the guy who would go on to literally write the book on the entire medium in Understanding Comics, handled the first year, and Mark Millar prior to his breakout success wrote a number of incredibly charming and sincere Superman stories here, including arguably the best Luthor story in How Much Can One Man Hate?, and a full comic on every page in 22 Stories In A Single Bound.

Recommendations: Superman has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to runs of just plain fun comics. For the youngest in your family, Superman Family Adventures might just be what you’re looking for. Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the Eighth Grade would fit on your shelf very well next to Superman Adventures. Superman: Secret Origin, while not the absolute best take on his early days, has some real charm and would be an ideal introduction for younger readers that won’t talk down to them in the slightest, and that you’ll probably like yourself (especially since it seems to be the ‘canon’ Superman origin again). If you’re interested in something retro, The Superman Chronicles cover his earliest stories from the 30s and 40s, and Showcase Presents: Superman collects many of his most classic adventures from the height of his popularity in the 50s and 60s. Age of the Sentry and Alan Moore’s Supreme would also work well. For slightly older kids (i.e. middle school), they might get a kick out of Mark Millar and Lenil Yu’s Superior, or What’s So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way? And finally, for just plain fun Superman runs, I can’t ignore the last year of Joe Casey’s much-overlooked time on The Adventures of Superman.

7. Superman vs. Lex Luthor

What: Exactly what it says on the tin: a collection of 12 Luthor stories from his first appearance to the early 21st century.

Why: Well, he’s Superman’s biggest enemy, that’s why, and even on his own is one of the best villains of all time. Thankfully, this is an exceptionally well-curated collection of his greatest hits; pouring through this should give you more than a good idea of what makes him tick.

Recommendations: While he has a number of great showings in Superman-centric comics, his two biggest solo acts outside of this would be Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo’s Luthor (originally titled Lex Luthor: Man of Steel) and Paul Cornell’s run on Action Comics, where Lex took over the book for about a year. Also, one of Superman’s best writers, Elliot S! Maggin, contributed a few stories here - he’s best known for his brilliant Superman novels Last Son of Krypton and the aforementioned Miracle Monday, and he wrote a number of other great tales I picked some highlights from in another article.

8. Grant Morrison’s Action Comics

What: Spanning years, it begins in a different version of Superman’s early days, where an as-yet-flightless Clark Kent in a t-shirt and jeans challenged corrupt politicians, grappling with the public’s reaction to its first superhero even as his first true menace approaches from the stars. Showing his growth over time into the hero he becomes, he slowly realizes that his life has been subtly influenced by an unseen but all-powerful threat, one that in the climax will set Superman’s greatest enemies’ against him in a battle not just for his life, but for all of reality.

Why: The New 52 period for Superman was a controversial one at best, and I’d be the last to deny it went down ill-advised roads and made outright bone-stupid decisions. But I hope if nothing else this run is evaluated in the long run the way it deserves; while the first arc is framed as something of a Superman origin story, it becomes clear quickly that this is about his life as a whole, and his journey from a cocksure young champion of the oppressed in way over his head, to a self-questioning godling unsure of the limits of his responsibilities as his powers increase, and finally an assured, unstoppable Superman fighting on the grandest cosmic scale possible against the same old bullies. It gives him a true character arc without undermining his essential Superman-ness, and by the end it’s a contender for the title of the biggest Superman story of all.

Recommendations: Outside of this, Greg Pak’s runs on Action Comics and Batman/Superman, and Tom Taylor/Robson Rocha’s 3-issue Batman/Superman stint, as well as Scott Snyder, Jim Lee and Dustin Nguyen’s blockbuster mini Superman Unchained, are the best of the New 52 era. If you’re looking for more wild cosmic Superman adventure stories, Grant Morrison’s Superman Beyond is a beautiful two-part adventure (it ties in to his event comic Final Crisis but largely works standalone), and Joe Casey’s Mr. Majestic was a largely great set of often trippy cosmic-scale adventure comics with its Superman-esque lead. For something a little more gonzo, maybe try the hilariously bizarre Coming of the Supermen by Neal Adams. And while his role in it is relatively minor, if we’re talking cosmic Superman-related epics, Jack Kirby’s Fourth World has to be mentioned - it’ll soon be reissued in omnibus format to coincide with the Justice League movie, since many of its concepts made it in there.

9. Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

What: More than just the title story, DC issued a collection of all three of Watchmen writer Alan Moore’s Superman stories: For The Man Who Has Everything, where Superman finds himself trapped in his idea of his ideal life while Batman, Wonder Woman and Robin are in deadly danger in the real world, Jungle Line, where a deliriously ill and seemingly terminal Superman finds help in the most unexpected place, and Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, Moore’s version of the final Superman story.

Why: Dark Superman stories are a tricky tightrope to walk - go too far and you invalidate the core his world is built around - but Moore’s pretty dang good at his job. Whatever Happened you should wait to read until you’ve checked out some Superman stories from the 1960s first since it’s very much meant as a contrast to those, but For The Man Who Has Everything is an interesting look at Superman’s basic alienation (especially in regards to his characterization in that period of his publication history) with a gangbuster final fight, and Jungle Line is a phenomenal Superman horror story that uncovers some of his rawest, most deeply buried fears.

Recommendations: There are precious few other dark Superman stories that can be considered any real successes outside a few mentioned among other recommendations; the closest I can think of is Superman: For Tomorrow, which poses some interesting questions framed by gorgeous art, but has a reach tremendously exceeding its grasp. Among similar characters though, there are some real winners; Moore’s own time on Miracleman was one of the first and still one of the most effective looks at what it would mean for a Superman-like being to exist in the real world, and the seminal novel Superfolks, while in many ways of its time, was tremendously and deservedly influential on generations of creators. Moore had another crack at the end of a Superman-like figure in his Majestic one-shot, and the Change or Die arc of Warren Ellis’ run on Stormwatch (all of which is worth reading) presented a powerful, bittersweet look at a superman’s attempt at truly changing the world for the better.

10. All-Star Superman

What: Superman rescues the first manned mission to the sun, sabotaged by Lex Luthor. His powers have reached greater heights than ever from the solar overexposure, but it’s more than his cells can handle: he’s dying, and Lex has won at last. This is what Superman does with his last year of life.

Why: I put this at the bottom since it works better the more you like Superman, but if you’re only going to read one story on this list, this one has to be it. It’s one of the best superhero stories period, and it’s everything that’s wistful and playful and sad and magical and wonderful about Superman in one book.

Recommendations: If you’re interested in the other great “Death of Superman” story, skip the 90s book and go to co-creator Jerry Siegel and Curt Swan’s 60s ‘Imaginary Story’, also one of the best Superman stories ever, and particularly one of Luthor’s best showings. If you got a kick out of the utopian ‘Superman fixes everything’ feel of a lot of it, try The Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman-Blue! The current Supergirl title by Steve Orlando seems to be trying to operate on a pretty similar wavelength, and is definitely the best thing coming out of the Superman family of books right now. The recent Adventures of Superman anthology series has a number of creators try and do their own ‘definitive’ Superman stories, often to great results. And Avengers 34.1 starring Hyperion by Al Ewing and Dale Keown taps into All-Star’s sense of an elevated alien perspective paired with a deep well of humanity to different but still moving results.

Secrets

MASTERLIST

Requested: yes

Word count: 2,611

Small echoes from the few passing cars rang in my ears, as the sun started to burn properly into my skin. My heavy feet dragged themselves across the street, aching every step of the way. They always hurt like this, whenever I’d joined the boys for their early morning workout.

Though, I didn’t quite want to admit it, I simply couldn’t keep up with them. Especially Geoff was a beast and contingently mocked me, every time I had to stop and catch my breath.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

After a slightly botched heist, twice the paperwork has to be done at the station and the crew have to wait an extra 30 minutes to regroup after because, rather than unlocking his handcuffs and escaping the car, smooth-talker Free thought it would be better to convince the cops driving to hit somebody driving a motorcycle on the way back to the station. "But it looked so cool you should have seen the way he went flying!" He proclaims as Geoff drinks to repress the urge to strangle him.

Honestly Geoff can’t even be mad when they break Gavin out of the station and a cop is screaming “he made me do it” as he’s being dragged away. Gavin has the smuggest look on his face and for a second Geoff is running though the list of underlings he owns to see if he somehow missed one in disguise. When they get out and Gavin retells the past few hours, no one can believe what they’re hearing. Gavin, top tier criminal in Los Santos and universally hated by every cop in the city for belonging to the FAHC somehow managed to convince a cop to run down a pedestrian in cold blood. Now, anyone that has ever been on the receiving end of Gavin’s charm knows that he has a mysterious way of getting what he wants out of you. He picks and prods at just the right places, has just the right aloof tone to make him nonthreatening. Never in a million years would Geoff think that Gavin’s skills applied to cops arresting him, so when Gavin is laughing about it he can’t even muster the energy to be upset that he cut the heist short. He’s honestly too impressed.

Some thoughts on Koriand’r

The thing I think of when I think about Starfire is that absolutely nothing about her, her appearance or personality, is subtle.

Her being bright orange is one thing, having hair that dwarfs the rest of her body is another. Her gigantic 80s hair has always been one of my favorite Starfire traits. Her chosen color for clothing is purple, her eyes glow green, and her choice of outfits for her days off are generally amazingly flashy. Not that she doesn’t pull them off fantastically, I never thought round, hot-pink shades could look so good.

And of course, Tamaraneans are an amazingly emotional race. Even more than humans, everything Tamaraneans do is emotionally fueled. Starfire does what she wants without beating around the bush. She speaks whatever is on her mind, and makes her every emotion and desire known.

When she first arrives on Earth, she can’t speak English, but makes her intentions known quite well through pure body language. When she does learn English, it’s by sticking her tongue down Robin’s throat- admitting afterwards that she didn’t actually need lip contact to learn, just touching his arm would have been fine. But she wanted to kiss him, so she did.

In the Geoff Johns Teen Titans run, she’s if anything more brash and outgoing. She tells Wonder Woman to get away from her home and leave Cassie Sandsmark alone, and then attacks her when she doesn’t. And then, when Diana gets back up and tells her not to do that again, Kori just shoots her again without a word. Pages later, she flings a Starbolt at Superman out of nothing but pure spite, knowing it would accomplish nothing but to insult him.

What am I saying with all this? I’m saying that Princess Koriand’r of Tamaran, AKA Starfire, is the coolest and I love her.

‘… the mines of the Carlin Trend remain unhealed—in fact, year on year, they are growing—a raw scurvy of rocks exposed on a scale so monumental that geologists estimate mines, not cities, will be the final trace of humanity left visible in a hundred million years’ time, a common weal of injuries through which civilization once thought it could run forever…’

- geoff manaugh, infinite exchange

anonymous asked:

you did it with Ryan, and kind of mentioned it with the one about them being kids on Los santos at the same time but could you consider team nice dynamite being a thing before the fahc?

What a horrifying catastrophe. Not so much terrifying rumour as neon warning sign; the epitome of collateral damage, less interested in taking over the world than they are burning it to the ground.

They met when they were almost painfully young, when Gavin comes all the way to America to work with a crew only to find that they’d misrepresented themselves. Had sold him on a single job, with the possibility of discussing more work, when in reality they had no intention off letting him go. It’s a big gang, nasty, and while they covert his talents they clearly think Gavin is otherwise more or less harmless; quick and clever but easily cowed. There’s an argument, some unfortunate unpleasantness, then a week or two of waiting for some violent action, some futile stand. When it doesn’t come they know they’ve got him, crew leaders more smarmy and self-satisfied than ever as Gavin slinks about the base with drooping shoulders and a permanent guard.

Michael had been working with the crew, not really a full member yet – they were stringing him along, making him prove himself over and over and he wasn’t exactly rushing the process along. He’d gotten involved without knowing enough about them, young and eager to make his mark, only realising his predicament when it was too late to just walk away. It’s not the way things are done with this kind of crew, and Michael resigns himself to hunting for someone bigger and badder to align with or risk catching a bullet to the back of the head.

Michael didn’t know what was happening with the British kid until the fallout, and honestly he didn’t really care. Made him respect the crew less, made him more eager than ever before to trade up and get gone, but he’s no one’s hero and anyone dumb enough to take an offer from Los Santos at face value, swallow the promise of some kind of utopian partnership from strangers across the sea, deserves what they get. The fact that Gavin seemed interesting, weird and bright and funny before the carpet was pulled out from under him definitely doesn’t haunt Michael’s thoughts. Doesn’t make him consider breaking them both out – he can’t go carrying deadweight after all, and anyone who crumbles this quickly will never be an asset. It’s just sad really, kind of pathetic, and Michael does his level best to stay away from him. Doesn’t want to watch Gavin shrink into an obedient shadow, or worse, make a friend only to abandon him in this hellhole when the opportunity to leave finally presents itself.

What he failed to anticipate was the fact that Gavin doesn’t fold like a house of cards, doesn’t resign himself to a new life or kill himself trying to get away. He doesn’t even make a quiet escape, slip out in the dead of night when even his guards are asleep, oh no. This, it turns out, would be America’s first taste of Gavin’s furious wrath, and they couldn’t have been less prepared.

Having kept himself apart Michael was the only one who noticed it happening, the only one who recognised the source of the slow destabilisation of the crew, the surprising origin of countless petty fights and ever growing tempers. He watches Gavin’s idle chatter seep out, tracks the path of poisonous rumours as they spread throughout the crew, and says nothing. Gavin turns harmless words into knives, bows his head to hide a vicious smirk as he talks the crew into gutting itself and Michael, who tried so hard not to look, suddenly can’t look away.

Bringing down the leaders doesn’t take all that much, in the end; when there’s nothing connecting them but violence and power there is no true loyalty, they’re each as paranoid and selfish as each other and all too willing to believe the others might plot against them. It was terrifying, morbidly beautiful, but not quite enough. Not when they’re armed and Gavin isn’t, free when Gavin isn’t, not when eventually they’re going to put two and two together and maybe Gavin is prepared to go down with this ship, die knowing they cannot recover from what he made them do, but Michael’s not done yet. More than ready to stop sitting on the bench, to exercise his itchy trigger finger, not quite prepared for the most interesting thing thats ever happened to him to end so soon.

It’s not even that difficult, really, not with the whole crew fractured and dwindling, when everyone’s too busy pointing fingers at each other to look for threat from the distant outsider. Michael’s let them think little of him for far too long for them to worry about him now, and it’s the last mistake they’ll ever make. What Gavin ruined Michael destroys, neatly foreshadowing the future of their partnership.

The two stay together even once they leave, recognise each other for what they are, kindred souls, matching violence in their smiles, chaos in their blood. The flame and the gasoline, inseparable once combined, delighting in devastation. The reckless carelessness of youth combined with near heartless violence results in a dangerous kind of confidence, flippant and self absorbed, interested in nothing outside their own amusement, refusing to accept the possibility of any line they shouldn’t cross, any difficulty they cannot overcome. What could stop them now that they’re together? What could anyone do but get out of their way? Gavin talks them into fortunes, Michael tears them out of trouble and they both revel in the mayhem they leave in their wake. Relish the ability to do whatever they like whenever they like with no unwanted master pulling their strings.

Not that no one is interested; their reputation precedes them and everyone from big crews to wanna-be somebodies have recognised their potential. Bar some serious behavioural issues they’re basically the dream team if anyone could keep them. Clever, violent, entirely amoral and quick on their feet, appealingly loyal and young enough that they should have been easy to manage if only they could be convinced to care about anything outside of each other, outside of playing and performing and planning the next wild adventure.

It almost shakes them apart, sometimes, that need to do something drastic. Something grand and unforgivable, cataclysmic. Chasing after any flashy thing that catches their attention, forever wanting bigger and more thrilling but lacking any real direction. It has them at each others throats as often as not but they always pull it together in the end, unshakable affection winning out over frustration every damn time, and woe to any who tried to capitalise on their momentary troubles. Who try to pull one away, encourage the rift, who think this priceless opportunity rather than a minor bump in the road.

The more harmless opportunists, the ones who just try to sell their own grandeur, to recruit Michael and Gavin, or worse, one or the other are merely jeered out of the room, left confused and humiliated but still whole. Those who try to contain them, restrain them, pull them back to some degree of responsibility for their actions and force them into deals they have no interest in complying with are simply torn apart. Left as warning, as promise, a reminder that for all their inexperience, their aimless wandering and lack of allies, Michael and Gavin are the furthest thing from harmless.

It’s not that they’d never work with another crew, theres something to be said for a steady home, for someone else to watch your back, to plan your attacks, its just that they have a hard time trusting anyone else. A hard time believing that joining a crew won’t land them right back where they started, that any boss would truly understand that loyalty can’t be taken by force, that allegiance needn’t look like subservience.

So when the infamous Ramsey comes along and offers them a job they turn up their noses, bare their teeth and laugh in his face. When he offers again they try to disappear, ghost away like they have countless times before. When he tracks them down regardless they take out one of his safe-houses in explosive retribution. He comes back and they taunt him, sharp words and defensive sneers. Still again he returns, to threats, to violence, to childish graffiti and a layer of furious distrust coating possessive fear. They push and shove and snap and snarl and do everything in their power to chase him away and every time they think they’ve managed he turns up again, unnervingly mild mannered and relentlessly insistent. He offers and is met with complete disbelief, offers and is met with a million and one questions, he offers and somehow winds up in a negotiation that costs him his car and all the cash in his wallet with nothing in return. Geoff offers more than a job, offers a home, a family, a surprising tolerance for their many quirks; he lays all his cards on the table and lets them try to shred him apart, faintly amused but never condescending. He offers and offers and offers but never takes, never forces, never even alludes to the fact that he could, the way his position of power is so disproportionately greater than theirs. Geoff offers, and in the end they say yes.

anonymous asked:

How do you think the FAHC would react to jack being out cold and held hostage by someone competent?

The second they walk into the room with Geoff, they know something is wrong. The air is like ice and its weight is tangible; something is wrong. Jack is gone. While not a scary statement on its own, as Jack is very capable of defending herself, the words drip from Geoff’s lips with such severity that Ryan is already heading to his room to grab his mask. Jack is unthreatening to the untrained eye, motherly, sweet, and whoever picked her as their target obviously thought she wouldn’t put up a fight. When the Fakes receive a picture from another highly respected gang member, she looks like she did some damage to her captor, but she’s also out cold. As much as it seems like Jack is dispensable, like she’s just their getaway driver, she’s an integral part of the crew. There’s also something that the rival gang members failed to realize: they love her so fiercely that Los Santos will burn before anyone harms her.

Gavin is on tracking duty, pinpointing and hacking his way through the internet to find a digital trail. Michael and Ryan have the living room scattered with weapons, everything from a handgun to a rocket launcher is secured to a body within the hour. Geoff is running though a verbal plan as he paces, waiting for the exact location of his right hand man. Jeremy and Ray have the cars warmed and ready to go. The second they arrive at the building, there is no going silent. The building shakes as a rocket blasts the sides. People screaming, though muffled, can be heard to the core. Gavin monitors the inside though hacked security cameras and even the person guarding Jack looks unnerved. He leaves the room for a second and that’s his mistake. The building is on fire now and Geoff Ramsey is sauntering towards him, unarmed. Before the goon has a chance to pull his weapon the backs of his knees are shot out. No one in that building makes it out alive after having taken the crew mother from her boys, and no one is more angry than Jack when she wakes up, insisting that they should have left her some to kill after. 

Puppy Power

Orphan Brigade [Baby Years]: The story of how an infamous crime lord became the guardian of three children and a teenager.


Days out with the lads had a tenancy to be hectic beyond belief. Either the boys would disappear (they were curious and liked to explore), someone would get hurt (the Lads were also notoriously clumsy) or Geoff and Jack would run into old enemies. 

Geoff was determined to make this weekend different. They desperately needed some calm,  stress free fun. 

So Jack packed a picnic for the family and they all headed to the local park. Their new puppy came along too and the boys spend most of their time playing fetch with Kain. 

Michael had spent most of the previous night hidden under the covers of his bed, playing his DS. So it wasn’t long before he was totally exhausted. He slipped away from the group and sat against a tree. He slowly drifted off to sleep, still leaning against the bark. 

After a short while, Kain noticed that Michael had gone missing and abandoned Gavin and Ray in order to find him. Finding the boy asleep, Kain curled up at Michael’s side, resting his chin on Michael’s leg contently. 

A short while later, when Ryan headed to the tree to collect Michael, he spotted a strange man walking towards the sleeping child. Ryan narrowed his eyes angrily and sped up. But before he could reach the man, Kain jumped to attention. Barking loudly he raced towards the intruder, biting his leg. 

Ryan smirked as he watched the man race off, limping. “Good boy.” He petted Kain gratefully and picked Michael up. Even Kains barking hadn’t woken the sleeping Lad. “Come on boy. Time to go home.” 

rooster-geek  asked:

Hey there! For that FAHC bonanza, could you do Gold Angel by Minke for Gavin? I feel like that song perfectly matches the rose gold aesthetic, it's got such a chill vibe and so much of Fake AH Gav's personality. (Sorry I don't really have much of a plot to go with it though!!)

Word Count: 1,132

Warnings: Guns

Song: Gold Angel by Minke

“He’s doing it again,” Jeremy whispered as you continued to dig through your bag taking inventory.

You sighed and looked over your shoulder at Michael and Gavin talking, seeming very engrossed in their conversation. You narrowed your eyes and looked back up at Jeremy, “Stop it. I need to take count. Make sure we have enough ammo.”

“I swear. He’s doing it right now,” Jeremy insisted.

Keep reading

3

Yes members as Eevee’s evolutions:

  • Jon Anderson - Eevee
  • Chris Squire - Vaporeon
  • Bill Bruford - Jolteon
  • Tony Kaye - Umbreon
  • Steve Howe - Flareon
  • Rick Wakeman - Leafon
  • Alan White - Glaceon
  • Geoff Downes - Espeon
imagine/headcanons

okay so i just read some headcanons that fake ah crew! geoff is like batman’s number one fan and this popped inot my head.

like the crew has a friend (the reader) whoknows about their life but doesnt really care. 

she is a total sweetheart, all about morals and helping others, god knows how she’s friends with these losers. 

doesn’t tell them about her job or her past but they dont really care. 

then one day, theyre robbing a bank in the middle of the night (for the first time theyre actually stealthy) and a figure appears in front of them and geoff nearly has a heart attack. 

it;s not batman, but y/sh/n (your superhero name) in their signiture mask and their fist raised, telling them to put the money down and leave. 

gavin nearly shits his pants from fear, he had heard stories of you and how strong you are. so he instantly surrenders, 

ray gives up but is also causal about it. “ i got it dude, im settingt he money down, cool mask though , you like pokemon?”

michael holding geoff back from running at you for a picture and an autograph, sure you werent batman, but you were still famous from all of gotham and los santos

jack is merely sizing you up before nodding at ryan who charges at you in a battle. 

geoff wasnt happy “ ryan no what are you doing s’ll kill you! get me a picture!

during the fight your mask falls off and they see that it’s you. 

theyre all totally silent, hard to read their emotions until geoff speaks up. 

“ YOU DIDN’T TELL US YOURE A SUPERHERO?!?!?!”

*gavin ends up fainting. 

ever sicne then theyve been super protective of you when you fight crime. 

“ jack im okay im a superhero ill be fine i dont need a sweater.”

“ YOULL GET A COLD, “

geoff constantly asks you questions. 

“have you meet batman?”

“yes.”

“ *gasp* do you know his secret identity????”

“ yes.”

“ can you tell me!?!?!”

“ nope, sworn to secrecy geoffy.”

“ but Y/NNNNNNNNNNN!!!!”

you end up taking them with you when you fight crime. you regret that desision. 

“ y/n becareful he has a gun!’’

“ im aware jack!”

“ guys where did gavin go?”

*gavin screaming*

“ ill go get him.”

“ thank you michael.”

youre flirty frenimies with the gotham sirens. when they meet the fake ah crew the guys are dumbstruck by them, jack is protective momma bear when they get too touchy around you. 

“ why is y/sh/n freinds with a gang like you?”

“ why is she friends with a dumb wanna-be clown like you?”

“ umm…guys?”

“ stay out of this y/n, im not letting these bitches touch my babygirl.”

i think im gonna make a ton of little ficlets like this. 

what do you guys think?????

anonymous asked:

(1) I love Jack and he needs more love all around so, I propose a fahc headcanon that Jack is always the first to see things in the crew. She was the first one to join Geoff and he always runs new ideas past her first. She was the first one Gavin opened up to about his family in England and how he got to Los Santos and into crime. She was the first one Michael showed a softer less-explosive side to and openly accepted a hug from. She was the first to see Ryan without his mask after she caught

(2) him in the penthouse in the middle of the night, contemplating this newfound family. She was the first one Lil J confessed to when he felt worried that he didn’t belong in the crew (and the first to receive a relieved hug from him when he did feel a part of it). And as much as they all love Jack and are happy to know her, Geoff’s always annoyed he isn’t first for each of these moments, he’s the boss guys come on!

The thing that makes Jack lovely to talk to also makes her dangerous. She’s unthreatening. Motherly. Earnest. Jack is the kind of person you spill your soul to when there’s nobody else in the world that will listen to your sorrows. That makes her indispensable because she’s the one that knows all your secrets, that can get you to talk without you realizing your being manipulated. The Fakes have no concern with this for one particular reason; Jack is a vault. She’s someone you can trust, if she trusts you in return. It’s not an exaggeration when she’s called the crew’s mother. With the loving care she provides to each and every one of them, with the shoulders she’s provided to cry on, to the walls she’s broken down around them and safety she’s provided, she’d be damn insulted if you said they weren’t hers. Geoff envies her a bit because being the head of the crew is supposed to mean you know the ins and outs of everyone, only he doesn’t. Jack does. Jack is always first and Geoff now accepts that, because when she’s by his side when he’s being dragged through the mud there’s no one else he’d rather be with.