spectrum.ieee.org
Genetically Modified Bacteria Conduct Electricity, Ushering in New Era of Green Electronics
Soil bacteria modified to conduct 2000 times as much electricity as that in untreated dirt

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst have genetically modified common soil bacteria to produce nanowires capable of conducting electricity at a level that surprised even the scientists themselves. After years of skepticism that this was even theoretically possible, the practical demonstration could lead to a new generation of “green” electronics in which nanowires could be produced in plant waste, without the need for toxic chemicals.

The research, which was supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), goes back to a series of papers that Derek Lovley, a professor at UM Amherst, published back in 2011. Lovely overcame skeptics who claimed it was impossible for soil bacteria to conduct electricity. Brushing aside computer models indicating that it was impossible to make the bacteria into electrically conductive nanowires, Lovley demonstrated through experiments that it was indeed possible.

“Research like Dr. Lovley’s could lead to the development of new electronic materials to meet the increasing demand for smaller, more powerful computing devices,” said Linda Chrisey, a program officer in ONR’s Warfighter Performance Department, in a press release. “Being able to produce extremely thin wires with sustainable materials has enormous potential application as components of electronic devices such as sensors, transistors and capacitors.”

The bacteria that Lovley has used in his experiments are called Geobacters; they possess nanoscale protein filaments extending outward from their bodies. These protein filaments are the key to the bacteria’s growth, as they allow it to make electrical connections to the iron oxide contained in the soil where it lives. While these connections allow the Geobacter to survive, it was believed that they could never be made to conduct electricity to the extent that it would ever be useful for human interests, namely electronics.

Continue Reading.

There is a fundamental reason why we look at the sky with wonder and longing—for the same reason that we stand, hour after hour, gazing at the distant swell of the open ocean. There is something like an ancient wisdom, encoded and tucked away in our DNA, that knows its point of origin as surely as a salmon knows its creek. Intellectually, we may not want to return there, but the genes know, and long for their origins—their home in the salty depths. But if the seas are our immediate source, the penultimate source is certainly the heavens… The spectacular truth is—and this is something that your DNA has known all along—the very atoms of your body—the iron, calcium, phosphorus, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and on and on—were initially forged in long-dead stars. This is why, when you stand outside under a moonless, country sky, you feel some ineffable tugging at your innards. We are star stuff. Keep looking up.
—  Jerry Waxman
Your experiences today will influence the molecular composition of your body for the next two to three months, or perhaps for the rest of your life. Plan your day accordingly.
— 

UCLA’s Steve Cole from The Social Life of Genes.

Your DNA is not a blueprint. Day by day, week by week, your genes are in a conversation with your surroundings. Your neighbors, your family, your feelings of loneliness: They don’t just get under your skin, they get into the control rooms of your cells. 

motherboard.vice.com
Plants Know When They’re Being Touched
Researchers saw a change in thousands of plant genes occurred just minutes after they were sprayed with water.

Humans have been attributing a secret, interior life to plants for thousands of years. It began with the nature worship of our far-distant ancestors and continued on into the modern age thanks to people like Cleve Backster, a CIA polygraph expert who performed experiments in the 1960s to demonstrate that plants could read our minds.

By and large, most research seeking to attribute a mental life to plants has been discredited over the years. Yet new research coming out of the University of Western Australia shows that while plants may not be able to think, they are—in a way—able to feel.

The UWA researchers arrived at this conclusion after they noticed that a change in the expression of thousands of plant genes occurred just minutes after they were sprayed with water. These genetic changes were short-lived (most reverted to their normal state within half an hour), suggesting that plants are highly in touch with their immediate environment and capable of dynamic responses to changes in their surroundings.

“Unlike animals, plants are unable to run away from harmful conditions,” said Olivier Van Aken, the lead researcher in the study. “Instead, plants appear to have developed intricate stress defense systems to sense their environment and help them detect danger and respond appropriately.

Continue Reading.

7

Quick and Simple guide for the new Poison and Toxic genes!


THERE WERE SO MANY SURPRISES WHAT IS THIS MAGIC


tumblr why are you making these blurry stop it. you looked just fine before what even

8

Our DNA is 99.9% the same as the person sitting next to us.

Physicist Riccardo Sabatini recently demonstrated a printed version of your genetic code would fill 262,000 pages, or 175 big books.

Large amounts of genetic code are used for similar biological mechanisms that are the same across many species. Here’s other genetically similar species.

(Business Insider)

Scientists Discover That Eyes Are Windows To The Soul

The eye is the window to the universe, and some would say they are also windows to the soul… We have heard this phrase get passed around before: “The eyes are the windows of the soul”. People usually say this when they can see pain, anger, or some other emotion in somebody else’s eyes.  But recent research gives a whole new meaning to this phrase.  Eyes not only windows to emotions, they are windows to the soul.

Keep reading

Structural differences between DNA and RNA.

DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, is like a blueprint of biological guidelines that a living organism must follow to exist and remain functional. RNA, or ribonucleic acid, helps carry out this blueprint’s guidelines. Of the two, RNA is more versatile than DNA, capable of performing numerous, diverse tasks in an organism, but DNA is more stable and holds more complex information for longer periods of time.