generation-y

November 19th, 2013,
‘Selfie’ was named the Word of the Year by the Oxford Dictionary
Pseudo-intellectuals everywhere cried about the ‘death of the English language’
Because God forbid modern colloquial speech be recognised as valid.
Time Magazine refers to ‘millenials’ as the ‘me me me generation’
Selfish, all we care about is personal gratification
Lazy, entitled, shallow narcissists.
A picture of a girl taking a selfie on her phone is used for the cover
Because our selfishness can be summed up in the fact that we like how we look enough to document it.
We are consumed, they tell us, with our self image.
Everything is about us.
Me-me-me.
With the addition of every word to the dictionary,
‘Hashtag’. ‘Perf’. ‘Sexting’. ‘Totes’. ‘Selfie’,
The ‘me-me-me’ generation continues to make it all about ourselves,
And we should, they tell us, weep,
We should weep because we are entitled,
Because all we care about are selfies and parties and Instagram,
Because this is the generation that will one day run the world,
And for that, we should weep,
Because all we are is ‘me-me-me’.
Let me tell you something.
Every year, university tuition will be 2.3% more expensive for MY GENERATION,
MY GENERATION reports higher levels of anxiety and depression than ANY other generation,
15% more of US than YOU will go to university,
But 46% of MY GENERATION won’t find a job until over a year after law school,
MY GENERATION, on average, is $47,628 in debt.
58% of girls in MY GENERATION feels like they are the wrong weight,
95% of people with eating disorders are part of MY GENERATION,
And MY GENERATION has a million dollar industry telling us that we are not good enough,
That we are ugly, lazy, and entitled,
And anything we do to be financially successful,
Or less stressed,
Or beautiful, god dammit,
Is in vain.
So pick up your phone,
Pick your favourite filter,
And take a goddamn selfie.
You deserve it for having to grow up in these times.
—  My poem, ‘Hashtag Selfie’.

We have been called “a lost generation…[not] giving birth to anything new” and “too quiet, too online.” In fact the opposite is true. There is a deafening roar in cyberspace. If a presidential election can be won through the support of an online movement, if articles and ideas can reach tens of millions of people overnight, and create a four-thousand person discussion, if YouTube can receive 200,000 new videos a day, then being “too quiet” and “too online” is the opinion of someone who doesn’t understand what it means to be online. Not creating anything new and not being loud enough are not our problems. So why the disrespect from the famous 60s generation? Because we aren’t doing what they want us to do.

Most of us were born after the end of the Cold War or were too young to remember it. The political climate we grew up in was one of supreme hypocrisy. One President nearly got impeached for a superficial sex scandal and then another later broke international laws to preemptively start a war without UN support and was re-elected to serve 2 full terms without so much as a breath of legal retribution.

The problem my generation faces is inheriting a world that baffles us: a world of hypocrisy and crisis; a world on the brink of collapse yet at the height of human civilization.

Imagine for a moment being one of us. Taught in school that all people are created equal, that all countries are sovereign, that freedom, democracy, and capitalism are embraced by all people and nations because they are ultimate ideals that allow us to prosper and live as we choose in the pursuit of happiness. Old enough to read the New York Times online and blog on Huffington Post, we see a very different world. Equality? Not for the poor, not for LGBT. Capitalism? It appears to have been a house of cards recklessly constructed by greed for the benefit of a few. Sovereignty? Not for resource-poor or oil-rich countries. Ideals? Not for the media or our political and business leaders.

Now we must navigate a world where a concentration of power, wealth, and media often conflicts with every ideal the Western world is supposed to stand for. If you think we are too quiet and too online you should consider that we have two choices. One, to accept the values we were taught to believe in and totally redefine and reconstruct the way our government/economy/society works so that these ideals match reality. Or two, to accept the world we live in and think up a new set of values to justify our lives.

I think understand why Robin Williams’ death is hitting us all so hard.

He played these legendary, larger than life characters like the Genie, Mrs. Doubtfire and Peter Pan.

There was never a time in our lives when he wasn’t on our TV screens and in the theaters.

But even though he has physically left this earth, he isn’t gone. As long as we keep watching his films and introduce his work to the next generation, he will always be making the world laugh.

My mom asked me what I wanted to be when I’m older all I said was happy and she looked at me in an odd way. Like for real, is that not good enough, I don’t want a shitty job in some scummy office with asshole coworkers, do you know how sad that would be? I think that our generation are gonna change the way things work, change the world, not sure how but I believe we can do it.

Picking Up the Pieces 

Our generation has been relentlessly ridiculed for being lethargic brats by those that have come before us but the burning question is, what if we have been left in the wake of something foredoomed? It is, of course, an argument that crops up in even the most political of debates; Can the kids cut it? Are they responsible enough to take on what we have left behind? Read on to find out why, perhaps, we aren’t as lazy as they believe we are. 

Keep reading

Generation Y are everything you feared. They’re everything your worst nightmares conjured up. They’re lazy, apathetic, unoriginal, scared of innovation, scared of difference, just plain scared. They binge drink. The confuse sex for intimacy. They definitely couldn’t tell you the capital cities of more than five countries. And they really think that Justin Bieber is the Second Coming. Only fifty per cent of Generation Y own more than two books and, yes, they listen to music, but they download it from the internet because content is free, yo. Want, take, have is their battle cry. Ladies and gentlemen, this is my generation and my generation is royally screwed up.
—  Sarra Manning, Adorkable

In 2013, the percentage of high school graduates hit an all time high with 81 per cent. All over the world, there are more people than ever searching and applying for tertiary education.
Teen pregnancy hit an all time low in 2013, heavy underage drinking is only at 17 % and the number of children and young people in court is the lowest is has been in 20 years.
Over the last few years, there has been a revival of the civil rights movement, the feminist movement and the lgbt movement. Young people all over the world are more likely to be accepting towards minorities, individuals and foreigners than any generation before us.  

And yet, older generations talk about us in demeaning tones. We have been coined as the ‘me, me, me’ generation, as the ‘I want it now’ generation, as a generation of people who only care about themselves, a generation of narcissists. Apparently, research shows that about 30 per cent of today’s youth has narcissistic tendencies.
Now, one may say that every generation in history has seen the younger generation as reckless, disregardful of the future and lazy. But this is different. This is different because unlike other generations before us, we are not at one, but at many turning points in history. we are the first generation to grow up with the internet. Never has the world been such a globalised community, never have the borders of countries meant so little. Never has technology moved so fast, never has information been as easily accessible as it is today. We are the first generation that, if we do not agree with what we learn in schools, we can educate ourselves, we are the first generation that can connect with people from america, from germany, from china, from south africa, from brazil,  and build friendships all over the world.
But not all is positive. We are also a generation that may be facing more threats to humankind than have ever existed in one time period before. Global climate change, oil and other natural resources running out, and a new face of terrorism in the form of ISIS and Boko Haram. The global economy is falling apart, and is responsible for the fact that we will be the first generation to be less wealthy than our parents, that most students in Australia will start working already in debt because of student loans.
A world in ruins is what my generation has been saddled with. We’re the ones who are holding on to each other despite our differences and telling each other it’s good to be who we are, whether we’re gay or straight or black or white. We have to save the environment, end wars and find homes for the asylum seekers this system has created, we have to cure poverty and wage inequality and food distribution, and as if all that was not enough it is harder than ever to get a job in this society, harder than ever to pay for education.
And we are the lazy ones.
Why? Because we like taking selfies? Because we like spending time on social media? Because we like spending time with our friends? Are we uncreative and stupid because we are not afraid to say “I’m awesome and I truly believe that”?.
We are proud of ourselves. We tell each other to love ourselves. That doesn’t mean we can’t feel for other people. And what good has ever come of being modest? Yes, society sees this as the ideal, but are we really happier if we constantly deny every compliment we get?
As cliche as it sounds, I believe you must love yourself before you can love and have a healthy relationship with anyone. As for the claim that we are uncreative; have you ever seen the internet? It is probably the biggest platform for creativity that has ever existed, because, as trivial as they are, memes are probably one of the most creative things humans have ever come up with. Recycling someone  else’s idea, putting your own twist on it and making it your own is what human civilisation is all about.
Even if you only look at one platform, you see it bustling with creativity. Youtube culture has enabled every one of us to have an audience to spread our message all over the world if we want to, enabled some of the best comedians to have their own space and make their own material, independent from any boundaries a company or studio might restrict them to. 4chan, while maybe not being the best example in decent human beings, has brought up on of the biggest activist groups of recent years, anonymous. On fanfiction.net or archiveofourown.org, users write entire books, that are not restricted by age, usual genres, or any of the conventional book themes. All over the internet, there are small groups and communities bonding over their favourite book, movie, TV Show, video game, over their desire to learn, over everything. And all of them have such a huge creative potential, all of them create so much information every day that it is almost unfathomable to the human mind.
Of course not every person our age is a shining beacon of hope, integrity and creativity, not all of us can change the world. But we all believe that we can. And we have to. Because if we don’t, our world will never be saved from past mistakes.
And that is what I want you all to learn today:
We are not vain because we love ourselves, and we are not bad people because we like using the internet. We are contributing to the biggest pool of information ever created by humankind.
There is a lot resting on our generation, and the problems of the future often seem unsolvable. But I believe that we all have the potential to save the world. Love the person you are and the person you’re becoming, because we will be a generation that people will look back to and say “They did something truly remarkable.”

—  My speech for english

We are 10 young journalists. Our skills are a little rough around the edges, but we have new perspectives to offer. We have 10 different backgrounds, have lived in 18 countries (not on gap yahs) and speak 10 languages.

Aside from student debt, what do we have in common? We are all members of Generation Y

— 

Tomorrow, the Guardian hands over control of its features content to 10 young trainee journalists. Look out for #G2GenY on your dash. 

Read the manifesto in full