general assemble

anonymous asked:

are you still planning on selling your berseria charms????

yes!!! i’m actually really close to being able to sell, i just gotta figure out what’s the most convenient way for me to deal with shipping 🤔🤔

Some nights were so / sensory I felt that starlight landing on my back / and believed I could set fire to things with my fingers
—  Denis Johnson, from “Talking Richard Wilson Blues, by Richard Clay Wilson,” The Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nations Millennium General Assembly: Poems New and Collected (HarperCollins, 1995)
Sonically, “Look What You Made Me Do” is one of her darkest turns. There’s no big, hopeful chorus like the empowering 1989 lead single “Shake It Off,” that addressed a more general assembly of haters and tabloid drama. She’s more direct, addressing her enemy with few subtleties. “All I think about is karma,” she threatens over an ominous beat that features elements of spooky carnival and horror-movie sound effects. It’s also Swift’s first song to interpolate music from another artist, when she references Right Said Fred’s “I’m Too Sexy” creepy-sexy delivery on the chorus.
—  Rolling Stone on Look What You Made Me Do (x)
huffingtonpost.com
Trump Threatens To ‘Totally Destroy’ North Korea In ‘America First’ Speech At United Nations
Trump also strongly indicated he would not renew the Iranian nuclear deal, in a forceful first speech before the international body.

Marina Fang at HuffPost:

President Donald Trump forcefully defended the United States and condemned North Korea and Iran in his first speech before the United Nations General Assembly, hailing “strong, sovereign nations” and urging fellow world leaders to “put your countries first,” while trying to strike a cordial tone on the international alliances he had previously criticized.

“As president of the United States, I will always put America first,” he said. “The United States will always be a great friend to the world and especially to its allies, but we can no longer be taken advantage of or enter into a one-sided deal in which the United States gets nothing in return.”

Trump’s speech Tuesday was an important test on the world stage, as the U.N. grapples with international crises, including North Korea’s growing nuclear program, terrorism and climate change.

“Rocket Man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime,” Trump said, referring to his nickname for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

He then said the U.S. “will have no choice but to totally destroy North Korea” if the regime does not tamp down its nuclear development and if it threatens the U.S. and its allies.

In a clear nod to his conservative base, Trump pledged to “crush the loser terrorists” and “stop radical Islamic terrorism.”

He also strongly indicated that he would not remain in the Iranian nuclear deal, which is up for renewal next month, calling it “one of the worst and most one-sided transactions the U.S. has ever entered into” and “an embarrassment.”

Trump’s speech presented another opportunity to push his “America First” foreign policy vision, this time in front of an international body he has often maligned.

During his presidential campaign, Trump regularly criticized the United Nations for mismanagement and ineffectiveness. And in December, he referred to it as “a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time.”

[…]

In his speech Tuesday, Trump celebrated the international alliances formed after World War II, a sharp contrast from his campaign rhetoric.

Yet he remained critical of the United Nations’ role and fiercely put forth his “America First” platform, boasting at the beginning of his scripted remarks that “the United States has done very well since Election Day.”

The reaction to Trump’s speech among the world leaders in the room was “muted at best” and “stone faced,” according to a press pool report from The New York Times’ Peter Baker. At the conclusion of the president’s remarks, there was “fuller, polite applause, though not rousing or enthusiastic.”

How Interpreters Juggle Two Languages at Once

For most of history, interpretation was mainly done consecutively, with speakers and interpreters making pauses to allow each other to speak. But after the advent of radio technology, a new simultaneous interpretation system was developed in the wake of World War II. In the simultaneous mode, interpreters instantaneously translate a speaker’s words into a microphone while he speaks, without pauses. Those in the audience can choose the language in which they want to follow.  

On the surface it all looks seamless, but behind the scenes, human interpreters work incessantly to ensure every idea gets across as intended. And that is no easy task.

It takes about two years of training for already fluent bilingual professionals to expand their vocabulary and master the skills necessary to become a conference interpreter. To get used to the unnatural task of speaking while they listen, students shadow speakers and repeat their every word exactly as heard, in the same language. In time, they begin to paraphrase what is said, making stylistic adjustments as they go. At some point a second language is introduced. Practicing in this way creates new neural pathways in the interpreter’s brain and the constant effort of reformulation gradually becomes second nature.  

Over time, and through much hard work, the interpreter masters a vast array of tricks to keep up with speed, deal with challenging terminology and handle a multitude of foreign accents. They may resort to acronyms to shorten long names, choose generic terms over specific, or refer to slides and other visual aids. They can even leave a term in the original language while they search for the most accurate equivalent.

Interpreters are also skilled at keeping aplomb in the face of chaos. Remember: they have no control over who is going to say what or how articulate the speaker will sound. A curve ball can be thrown at any time. Also, they often perform to thousands of people and in very intimidating settings, like the UN General Assembly. To keep their emotions in check, they carefully prepare for an assignment, building glossaries in advance, reading voraciously about the subject matter, and reviewing previous talks on the topic.

Finally, interpreters work in pairs. While one colleague is busy translating incoming speeches in real time, the other gives support by locating documents, looking up words and tracking down pertinent information. Because simultaneous interpretation requires intense concentration, every 30 minutes the pair switches roles. Success is heavily dependent on skillful collaboration.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How interpreters juggle two languages at once - Ewandro Magalhaes

Animation by @rewfoe

“I speak on behalf of the millions of human beings who are in ghettos because they have black skin or because they come from different cultures, and who enjoy status barely above that of an animal.

I suffer on behalf of the Indians who have been massacred, crushed, humiliated, and confined for centuries on reservations in order to prevent them from aspiring to any rights and to prevent them from enriching their culture through joyful union with other cultures, including the culture of the invader.

I cry out on behalf of those thrown out of work by a system that is structurally unjust and periodically unhinged, who are reduced to only glimpsing in life a reflection of the lives of the affluent.

I speak on behalf of women the world over, who suffer from a male-imposed system of exploitation. As far as we’re concerned, we are ready to welcome suggestions from anywhere in the world that enable us to achieve the total fulfillment of Burkinabè women. In exchange, we offer to share with all countries the positive experience we have begun, with women now present at every level of the state apparatus and social life in Burkina Faso. Women who struggle and who proclaim with us that the slave who is not able to take charge of his own revolt deserves no pity for his lot. This harbors illusions in the dubious generosity of a master pretending to set him free. Freedom can be won only through struggle, and we call on all our sisters of all races to go on the offensive to conquer their rights.

I speak on behalf of the mothers of our destitute countries who watch their children die of malaria or diarrhea, unaware that simple means to save them exist. The science of the multinationals does not offer them these means, preferring to invest in cosmetics laboratories and plastic surgery to satisfy the whims of a few women or men whose smart appearance is threatened by too many calories in their overly rich meals, the regularity of which would make you—or rather us from the Sahel—dizzy. We have decided to adopt and popularize these simple means, recommended by the WHO and UNICEF.

I speak, too, on behalf of the child. The child of a poor man who is hungry and who furtively eyes the accumulation of abundance in a store for the rich. The store protected by a thick plate glass window. The window protected by impregnable shutters. The shutters guarded by a policeman with a helmet, gloves, and armed with a billy club. The policeman posted there by the father of another child, who will come and serve himself—or rather be served—because he offers guarantees of representing the capitalistic norms of the system, which he corresponds to.

I speak on behalf of artists—poets, painters, sculptors, musicians, and actors—good men who see their art prostituted by the alchemy of show-business tricks.

I cry out on behalf of journalists who are either reduced to silence or to lies in order to not suffer the harsh low of unemployment.

I protest on behalf of the athletes of the entire world whose muscles are exploited by political systems or by modern-day slave merchants.

My country is brimming with all the misfortunes of the people of the world, a painful synthesis of all humanity’s suffering, but also—and above all—of the promise of our struggles. This is why my heart beats naturally on behalf of the sick who anxiously scan the horizons of science monopolized by arms merchants.

My thoughts go out to all of those affected by the destruction of nature and to those 30 million who will die as they do each year, struck down by the formidable weapon of hunger. As a military man, I cannot forget the soldier who is obeying orders, his finger on the trigger, who knows the bullet being fired bears only the message of death.

Finally, it fills me with indignation to think of the Palestinians, who an inhuman humanity has decided to replace with another people—a people martyred only yesterday. I think of this valiant Palestinian people, that is, these shattered families wandering across the world in search of refuge. Courageous, determined, stoic, and untiring, the Palestinians remind every human conscience of the moral necessity and obligation to respect the rights of a people. Along with their Jewish brothers, they are anti-Zionist.

At the side of my brother soldiers of Iran and Iraq who are dying in a fratricidal and suicidal war, I wish also to feel close to my comrades of Nicaragua, whose harbors are mined, whose villages are bombed, and who, despite everything, face their destiny with courage and clear-headedness. I suffer with all those in Latin America who suffer from the stranglehold of imperialism.

I wish to stand on the side of the Afghan and Irish peoples, on the side of the peoples of Granada and East Timor, each of whom is searching for happiness based on their dignity and the laws of their own culture.

I protest on behalf of all those who vainly seek a forum in this world where they can make their voice heard and have it genuinely taken into consideration. Many have preceded me at this podium and others will follow. But only a few will make the decisions. Yet we are officially presented as being equals. Well, I am acting as spokesperson for all those who vainly see a forum in this world where they can make themselves heard. So yes, I wish to speak on behalf of all “those left behind,” for “I am human, nothing that is human is alien to me.”

Our revolution in Burkina Faso embraces misfortunes of all peoples. It also draws inspiration from all of man’s experiences since his first breath. We wish to be the heirs of all the world’s revolutions and all the liberation struggles of the peoples of the Third World. Our eyes are on the profound upheavals that have transformed the world. We draw the lessons of the American Revolution, the lessons of its victory over colonial domination and the consequences of that victory. We adopt as our own the affirmation of the Doctrine whereby Europeans must not intervene in American affairs, nor Americans in European affairs. Just as Monroe proclaimed “America to the Americans” in 1823, we echo this today by saying “Africa to the Africans,” “Burkina to the Burkinabè.”“

| Thomas Sankara

[excerpt from his speech at the United Nations General Assembly on October 4th, 1984]


Long live Sankara.

Imagine on a hot day you had to walk miles to get some water for yourself and your family and carry gallons of water back to your home. Then imagine, you have to do this every day. This is only one of many challenges many people around the world faces to access water. United Nations General Assembly recognizes the human right to water and sanitation and acknowledges that clean drinking water and sanitation are essential to the realization of all human rights. Yet clean and safe water is not very accessible for many underserved communities around the world.