gene is my favorite

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“Sinful Caesar sipped his snifter, seized his knees, and sneezed.”

Donald O’Connor, Gene Kelly and Bobby Watson in “Singin’ In The Rain”, 1952

Cosmo fools around with Don and his diction coach. Finally, he “ruins” the lesson, but how can one be serious? Just look at him  … he’s simply the best! After all, ‘Moses supposes’ is born … tap dance at its best 👑!

Mr. O’Connor’s facial expression is priceless 💋!

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Gene Kelly and Vera-Ellen in On The Town (1949)

There was nothing the censors could put their fingers on. The red color, the girl in black and the sailor in white were very sensuous. The moves were sensuous. Yet I never laid a glove on her. There was nothing the censors could say. If they did, I could have said, “What? Do you have a dirty mind?" - Gene Kelly, Conversations with the Great Moviemakers of Hollywood’s Golden Age at the American Film Institute

Don: “Don’t tell me … it’s a flat tire!”

Cosmo: “I can’t understand it. This car hasn’t given me a lick of trouble in nearly six hours!”😊

Kathy: “This man … he’s … he jumped into my car and … I don’t even know who he is!”

Policeman: “Oh … why, it’s Don Lockwood!

….. “You’re a lucky little lady. Anything wrong?”

Kathy: “Why … why, NO!”💕

🎶“Good mornin’, good mornin’ …

It’s great to stay up late … good mornin’, good mornin’ to you!”🌞

🎵“Gotta Dance!”

The Broadway Ballet🎵

🎶“Moses supposes his toeses are roses, but Moses supposes erroneously.

Moses he knowses his toeses aren’t roses as Moses supposes his toeses to be!”🎶


🎬Original lobby cards  - “Singin’ In The Rain”, 1952 

☔starring Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds and Cyd Charisse (and many more, of course!)


From my collection

youtube

this is the new cryptid

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I ended up finishing the comic today. So it’s based off of that one quest in Far Harbor to get into The Nucleus you have to drink the water and follow the Mother of the Fog. I definitely imagine drinking that crap would not be good for your health…

Anyways, in my game I wasn’t going to side with the Children which is why the Mother of the Fog is giving Gene nightmares. The nightmare scared Gene, she thought about it for a few days, and decided maybe it’s best to make sure no one dies on the island… XD

I listened to a lot of Silent Hill ost(mainly from 2), but the song that inspired me and listened to on loop while working on the nightmare part was this!

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  • “Too bad I didn’t do that in ‘Dueling Cavalier’. They might have liked it.”
  • “Why don’t you?”
  • “What?”
  • “MAKE A MUSICAL!”

“Singin’ In The Rain”, 1952  (dir. Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly)

with Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, Debbie Reynolds and Jean Hagen 

writingisproseandpotatoes-deact  asked:

Hi! I'm writing a story, and I was wondering if it were possible for birds to evolve to glow in the dark within the next hundred years? If that is impossible, could they be made to glow?

So they definitely could be made to glow! There’s lots of genes out there that code for fluorescent proteins. My favorite is a jellyfish gene called GFP (which stands for green fluorescent protein), which codes for a green protein that glows under blue-violet or UV light. (however, it doesn’t necessarily glow in the dark, I’ve looked over the other known fluorescent proteins and I’m not sure of one that specifically glows in the dark, but I believe GFP or one of its derivatives would do the job, as they’re specifically related to jellyfish bioluminescence! It’s also possible I’m getting way too into specifics here, so moving forward, feel free to read GFP as ‘generic fluorescent protein which also glows in the dark because scifi’)

This gene is easily extracted and has been sequenced already (fun fact: we do need to sequence genes before we can work with them extensively - that’s why it was such a big deal to sequence the human genome!) so it’s often used as a marker in the biotech industry (not sure if your gene is being expressed? Just add GFP! You’ll know if it glows!)

To actually make an organism glow, you’d need to combine GFP with a gene that codes for a protein involved in the actual structure of the organism. For example, when I was in school, I did a project where I made yeast cells glow by combining GFP with one of the major structural genes of yeast, creating what’s called a recombinant gene. This meant that instead of just coding for the protein it originally coded for, (which was used to build the cytoskeleton) it coded for both that protein, and for GFP. When I put this gene into new yeast cells and let them colonize, their cytoskeletons also contained GFP, making them glow!

This is what GFP looks like in action! Yeast cells are pretty simple, being single-celled organisms and all, but birds are a little more complicated. It could be done (and combining some mammal DNA and even human DNA with GFP already has been done!), but it would take more time than just a semester. I would say several years at the minimum, and they might run into some problems with animal rights laws/ethics laws depending on the government where your scientists are science-ing.

You also wouldn’t have all birds glowing, just a specific species, probably manmade. It’s possible this could happen naturally, but unlikely, and you’d probably only see isolated cases unless something in their environment was making it more useful to glow than not. (It’s likely the opposite would happen - it would make them much more visible to predators, for one, and I’m not sure what might offset that to make it useful enough to be selected for. However, birds are weird, and sometimes select for things harmful to their survival because they think it looks pretty, so it’s entirely possible that happened.) You’d be unlikely to see an entire glowing species develop within 100 years from natural evolution alone unless the glowing trait was being heavily selected for.

This is such a neat idea! Good luck with your story!