gene Kranz

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Today is the 84th birthday of Gene Kranz, whose most famous quote is “Failure is Not an Option”. He also famously ordered the mission controllers to write “Tough and Competent” on their blackboards after Apollo 1. Those are the quotes I know him by.

He was the flight director during the scary Apollo 13 mission, leading mission control to bring Apollo 13′s crew home safely as portrayed by the 1995 Apollo 13 movie. His wife made mission vests for him also. Before his NASA career, he fought in the Air Force in Korea. He helped with the mission control on the Mercury-Redstone 1 flight with Chris Kraft, which only flew four inches high.

I recently read in an aviation maganize by EAA that he built a working full-size airplane in his garage during his retirement. He sadly never got to fly it. He got busy so he lent the plane to a nearby Texas museum, then in 2008 a hurricane came through, ruining the plane. 

EAA AirVenture | Oshkosh, WI
28 July 2017

I was lucky enough to be sitting in the fifth row at the Salute to Apollo panel. I didn’t take a lot of photos because I was trying to sit back and enjoy the moment, and I was also fighting a splitting migraine. Anyway, here’s my favorite shot of Gene Kranz from that event. (And a happy belated birthday to him!)

So, those who know me well know that I love learning. I especially love the space race of the 50s and 60s. Most of my heroes are astronauts, from all over the world, but every now and then, I’ll rediscover someone from behind the scenes. This last while, it’s been Gene Kranz, who was instrumental on getting the crew of Apollo 13 home. He was a flight director on a lot of NASA’s missions and one of the unique quirks about him was his wife used to make him hand made vests. His vest from Apollo 13 was white and now sits art the Smithsonian Museum. My favourite vest of his was the one he wore for Apollo 17…

Spaceflight will never tolerate carelessness, incapacity, and neglect. Somewhere, somehow, we screwed up. It could have been in design, build, or test. Whatever it was, we should have caught it. We were too gung ho about the schedule and we locked out all of the problems we saw each day in our work. Every element of the program was in trouble and so were we. The simulators were not working, Mission Control was behind in virtually every area, and the flight and test procedures changed daily. Nothing we did had any shelf life. Not one of us stood up and said, ‘Dammit, stop!’ I don’t know what Thompson’s committee will find as the cause, but I know what I find. We are the cause! We were not ready! We did not do our job. We were rolling the dice, hoping that things would come together by launch day, when in our hearts we knew it would take a miracle. We were pushing the schedule and betting that the Cape would slip before we did.


From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: ‘Tough’ and ‘Competent.’ Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect. When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write ‘Tough and Competent’ on your blackboards. It will never be erased. Each day when you enter the room these words will remind you of the price paid by Grissom, White, and Chaffee. These words are the price of admission to the ranks of Mission Control.

—  Gene Kranz addressing flight controllers the Monday after the fire in what became known as “The Kranz Dictum.”
youtu.be
Nasa - Salute to Apollo EAA AirVenture 2017
Join us tonight for a very special evening at Theater in the Woods. Then beginning at 8 pm David Hartman will host a Salute to the Apollo program featuring a...

I still haven’t gotten around to writing about Oshkosh so I decided to just share the entire Salute to Apollo with y’all. I HIGHLY RECOMMEND WATCHING THIS! BETWEEN JIM FORGETTING THE GEMINI 6 CREW AND THE JOKES AND JOE’S STORY ABOUT BEING ON THE BACKUP CREW FOR 14 IT’S A TRUE TREASURE THAT BELONGS IN A MUSEUM

The Jim and Frank Show starts at 21:22 fyi 

anonymous asked:

Is there like some kind of story between Agent Gillette's crisis vest?

I didn’t know this, but Yes, there is! It’s a nod to NASA flight director Gene Kranz and his stylish vests. When NASA established mission control, they broke the shifts up into three teams, red, blue and white. Kranz was on the white junior team. Well, he was a fan on the 3-piece suit (who isn’t?) and his wife liked to sew and Viola: a tradition was born. He would wear a specially-made white vest for each mission and during splash down would wear a festive version such as gold and silver or a sequined red, white, and blue. You can see some reference to this in the movie, Apollo 13. Kind of an adorable story, and I love that Ray would have it as his crisis wear!

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Failure is not an Option — The Kranz Dictum

Gene Kranz was the NASA Flight Director for the Gemini and Apollo programs, including the famous Apollo 11 landing on the moon, and the near disasterous Apollo 13 mission.  On the day after the Apollo I accident which killed astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee , he gave this historic speech to Mission Control, now known as “The Kranz Dictum”,

“Spaceflight will never tolerate carelessness, incapacity, and neglect. Somewhere, somehow, we screwed up. It could have been in design, build, or test. Whatever it was, we should have caught it. We were too gung ho about the schedule and we locked out all of the problems we saw each day in our work. Every element of the program was in trouble and so were we. The simulators were not working, Mission Control was behind in virtually every area, and the flight and test procedures changed daily. Nothing we did had any shelf life. Not one of us stood up and said, ‘Dammit, stop!’ I don’t know what Thompson’s committee will find as the cause, but I know what I find. We are the cause! We were not ready! We did not do our job. We were rolling the dice, hoping that things would come together by launch day, when in our hearts we knew it would take a miracle. We were pushing the schedule and betting that the Cape would slip before we did.

From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: 'Tough’ and 'Competent.' Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect. When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write 'Tough and Competent’ on your blackboards. It will never be erased. Each day when you enter the room these words will remind you of the price paid by Grissom, White, and Chaffee. These words are the price of admission to the ranks of Mission Control.”

TIMELESS, 10 REASONS TO WATCH

[The idea is to post one reason per day until the season finale. We want this show renewed! We love it, and here are some reasons you should love it, too! #Timeless #RenewTimeless]

#3 HISTORICAL FIGURES

Among the historical figures portrayed in Timeless are: Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, Ian Fleming, Wernher von Braun, Judith Campbell, Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie, Nonhelema, Charles Duke, Gene Kranz, Bonnie & Clyde, H. H. Holmes, George Washington, Benedict Arnold, Bass Reeves, Grant Johnson, Charles Lindbergh, Ernest Hemingway, Josephine Baker, among others.Timeless has accurately corrected mistaken concepts we might have had about a number of these people. The show really cares about showing History in its most accurate form.

#1#2

Coming Tomorrow: Reason #4

in collaboration with @officerparker

Failure is not an option

“From this day forward, Flight Control will be known by two words: ‘Tough’ and 'Competent.' Tough means we are forever accountable for what we do or what we fail to do. We will never again compromise our responsibilities. Every time we walk into Mission Control we will know what we stand for. Competent means we will never take anything for granted. We will never be found short in our knowledge and in our skills. Mission Control will be perfect. When you leave this meeting today you will go to your office and the first thing you will do there is to write 'Tough and Competent’ on your blackboards. It will never be erased.

These were the words of NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz the day after the Apollo 1 accident which claimed the lives of Astronauts Ed White, Roger Chaffee, and Gus Grissom.  The famous speech became known as "The Kranz Dictum”, and gave rise to the phrase “Failure is Not an Option”. “Tough and Competent” became the unofficial slogan of Mission Control.

I was almost always fat, even throughout my childhood. Around 2006 - 2008 I lost some weight and was pretty athletic, I even did a short stint as an MMA fighter, but quickly relapsed and gained it all back, then gained a lot more on top of it. At the beginning of December last year I was in a really dark place. I was eating fast food and visiting all you can eat buffets on a daily basis. I was drinking two or three large Faygo sodas a day.  I was eating junk food all the time. Clothes wouldn’t fit me, I was morbidly obese at 360lbs. I was in a state of hypertensive crises with a blood pressure in the 180’s/120 (120/80 is normal). I needed three different types of blood pressure medication to control it. My heart rate was 120. At night I could hear my heart beating in my ears, thump, thump, thump, thump! Due to my obesity combined with the strong diuretics I was taking for my blood pressure, I suffered from urge incontinence (overactive bladder). I was pre-diabetic, soon to be full blown Type 2 diabetic, if I was not diabetic already. My feet would break out in sores, a sure sign of diabetes.  I had cluster headaches and migraines on a weekly basis. I got sick a lot. Sometimes I would feel woozy if I stood up too quickly.  After walking up a flight of stairs, it would take me several minutes to completely catch my breath. I was always tired.  I fell asleep in class, at work, I would even nod off behind the wheel. I had little self confidence. I was depressed.  At my lowest point I even contemplated suicide.

I was dying, no two ways about it.  Not just physically, but mentally and spiritually as well. I firmly believe that had I gone the way I had another few years, a major health crises would have occurred like a heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, or having my feet removed from diabetes, and I would have never been able to come back from it.  The rest of my life would have been a slow death of declining health and chronic disease, resulting in me dying young. At that point I knew that I had one last chance to make a conscious decision between life and death. I chose life.

On New Years Eve 2016 I decided to make a commitment to change. I started exercising daily and I corrected my horrendous diet. Through discipline, motivation, character, and a great deal of pain, sweat, and sacrifice, I have resolved all of these health issues for the most part. My blood pressure is still a little bit high, but I only have to take one med at a reduced dosage. I intend to be off of it entirely by the end of August.  I have lost 45 lbs.  Where I was once tired all the time, sick, and depressed, even suicidal, today at any given moment I feel like a beast.  I’m as strong as a bull moose and every morning I wake up ready to wrestle a bear. My day starts at 4:30AM, and I immediately hit the kettlebells, do some Yoga, then I feel like a badass the rest of the day even when doing a 12 hour hospital shift. This time next year they will be calling up the Japanese Army, because I will be such a beast that I will be tearing apart Tokyo.

I still have about 135 lbs to go before I reach my goal.  But of course just because I reach a certain weight does not mean it will be over.  This is a permanent commitment. It does not end until the day I die. To symbolize that it’s a permanent commitment, I did a one up on Gene Kranz.  I didn’t write my personal weight loss motto “Never Again 360” on a chalkboard or post it on the refrigerator.  Less than two months ago, I got it permanently marked on my skin.

About two weeks ago our EKG machine was malfunctioning, and I was used a guinea pig for troubleshooting and repair.  I had to take my shirt off to have the probes attached to my chest, but I was not embarrassed.  My co-workers saw the tattoo, and I explained what it means.  My boss, who is also on a weight loss quest similar to mine, says he has an even greater respect level for me.  He says I have balls. It feels great that I am inspiring everyone around me.  Everytime I feel like going on an eating binge, or don’t want to exercise, I look at my tattoo to remind myself of what my life was like before, what I am trying to accomplish, and that I can never again go back to that old lifestyle. Then I change my mind.  Failure is not an option.

Never Again 360