gender language

Why Leftists Submit to Terror

Behavioral scientist Gad Saad explains how leftists have contracted Ostrich Parasitic Syndrome - the most dangerous mental virus in the world.

You won’t get the lying agenda driven MSM tell it like it actually is.

Subjects discussed:

Terror attacks. Leftist virtue signaling, the West is experiencing Stockholm  syndrome, The Left defending terrorism, islamic rapes, police not reporting islamic child grooming rape gangs, european rape victims defending their refugee rapists due to political correctness (yes, really), the left glorifying the hijab as “liberating” when it is oppressive (but the left contradicting themselves so they their feminists think a bikini is oppressing and the burka is liberating - yes really) Leftists rejecting facts and statistics while constantly pushing their false data. BillC-16. Leftist media ignore reports of massacre of 28 christians in Egypt. Leftist brainwashing little children as young as 3-4 with “gender fluidity” conditioning. Policing language, Marxism and Leftist mental gymnastics, doublethink, bigotry, fascism, oppression olympics and Bill Nye anti-science.

zangeldemon  asked:

Do you have any recommendations for definitive resources on the topic of creating and maintaining healthy boundaries (both personal and interpersonal) that you may have come across as a therapist? I'm wanting to learn more about how (from what I've read about boundaries so far) healthy boundaries with others help you better know who you are as a person; how it fosters self-image and self-identity. I appreciate anything you could pass along on the subject. Thank you for your time. :)

This is a good starter article. There is not a “definitive resource” - most books on the subject have pros and cons like anything else. The cavet I want to throw in here is that some of the books that are considered really good on the subject were written in the early 90s-00s. Some of the language around gender, relationships and sexuality can be anachronistic and very binary.  

You may want to give Boundaries and Relationships: Knowing, Protecting and Enjoying the Self by Charles Whitfield. Where to Draw the Line by Anne Katherine might be another option. Good luck!

queerlifeadvice.tumblr.com
multilingual pronouns list

hi! so the mods here at qla have decided that since not all our readers are native english speakers, it would be in everyone’s best interests to start a collection of gender-neutral pronouns across all languages. if you don’t see your language or pronouns on the list (within reason, for accessibility purposes we can’t include every english variant of a pronoun), please let us know and include conjugations if possible! thank you!

for further expansions on grammar you can check the posts in the pronoun project tag:)

arabic ( عربي )

  • هما (they, originally dual, can work as a neutral singular third person)
  • انتما  (second person dual)

bulgarian (български език)

  • те/тях/техен/им (generally used for a group of people, could be used as singular as in “they”)
  • то/него/негово/му (means “it”, informal)

chinese (中文)

  • mandarin/普通话:  他 or 她 (tā) - only the pronunciation is gender-neutral unfortunately, the characters are gendered
  • cantonese/广州话: 佢 (keoi5/keúih) - them/him/her/it
  • 它 - also tā, but means “it”. ask before using as it could be derogatory
  • 牠 - ta1, used for non-human animals
  • add 們 (men) to either for plural, add 的 (de) to make it possessive
  • 那个人 (simplified) 那個人 (traditional) (na4ge4ren2- that person) and 这个人 (simplified) 這個人 (traditional) (zhe4ge4ren2- this person)

czech/čeština

  • onikání, which was used in the past as gender-neutral pronoun when refering to someone of lesser status. it’s oni/je/jejich/se they/them/their/themself and the use is: Oni jsou moc milým člověkem. - They are a very nice person.

danish/dansk

  • de/dem/deres
  • hen/hen/hens

dutch/nederlands

  • zij/hen/hun
  • ze/hun/ze - (note: literal translation of they, but ze is often used as “she”)

english

  • they/them/theirs
  • ze/zem/zeirs
  • xe/xem/xeirs (xyr)
  • hir/hirs/hirself
  • spivak: e/em/eir

esperanto

  • ri
  • Ŝli - combination of he/she, generally used like “they” in english

estonian/eesti keel

  • tema/teda/tema (formal)
  • ta/teda/tema

farsi

  • او

finnish/suomen kieli

  • se/sen (means it, informal)
  • hän/hänen (formal)

french/le français

  • ol/mo - ex: ol s’appelle Bidule et c’est mo pote.
  • ille (referring to oneself), ceulle (referring to someone else)
  • eux (sometimes used as a subject-position instead of object-position)

georgian/kartuli/ქართული

  • ის / იმან / იმის (is / iman / imis) = they / them / their

german/deutsch

  • xier/xieser/dier
  • xier/xies/xiem/xien
  • sie_er
  • er_sie
  • sier
  • es
  • sie_r
  • si_er
  • x
  • sie*
  • er*

greek/ελληνικά

  • αυτοί / εκείνοι ( are these the ones that mean it?? let me know so i can take them down)
  • αυτ@, εκείν@ (singular) φίλ@ς (plural) - not pronounceable, good for writing though

hebrew/’lvrit/עִבְרִית

  • there aren’t actually any gender neutral pronouns in hebrew sadly. the first set is all male pronouns and the second one is all female. like the word ze (זה) is male for ‘it’ and it has a female form which is ‘zo’ (זו). atzmam (עצמם) is plural male (but it is used sometimes as neutral tbh). also the second set is only female pronouns for she, her, hers and herself

    also about the plurals, you need to add either ם or ן to make these words plural either in a male or female form,  like the plural words aren’t actual words it needs to be עצמם\שלהם\אותם\הם and it’s the male form you just need to replace it with ן to make it female but people use these as gender neutral pretty often because that’s the closest you would get

icelandic/islenska

  • hín/hín/híni/híns
  • hé/hé/hé/hés
  • það - equivalent of “it”, ask before using, could be derogatory
  • hán/hán/háni/háns - mix of binary pronouns
  • when referring to an individual of an unspecified gender, use viðkomandi instead of hann/hún

ilokano/Ti Pagsasao nga Iloko

  • isuna (singular they), na (singular their), kaniana/kenkuana (singular theirs), isuda (plural they), da (plural their), kaniada/kadakuwada (plural theirs)

indonesian/bahasa indonesia

  • dia (third person singular), mereka (third person plural)

irish/gaeilge

  • sibh/siad

italian

  • ????

latvian/latviešu valoda/lettish

  • viņi/viņu/viņiem

lithuanian/lietuvių kalba

  • Jie/Jų/Jiems/Juos/Jais/Juose

malay/bahasa melayu/bahasa malaysia

  • dia

michif

  • wiya

norwegian/norsk

  • dem/dem/deres
  • hen/hen(henom)/hens(henoms)
  • hin/hin/hins
  • sir/sir/sirs

portuguese/lingua portuguesa/português

  • el@/del@
  • elx/delx
  • elæ/delæ

punjabi

  • all pronouns are neutral (he/she: “uha usa” or ਉਹ ਉਸ; him/her: “usa” or “usanū” which is ਉਸ or ਉਸਨੂੰ; his/hers: “usadā” or ਉਸਦਾ). also, the pronouns “he” & “she” in english both translate to “vah” (वह) in hindi. however, the rest of the pronouns are gendered. verbs are also generally gendered.

russian/ру́сский язы́к

  •  ох/ех/ех/ем/их/ниx

slovak/slovenský jazyk

  • oni/nich/im/ich/nimi

slovenian/slovenščina

  • oni/z njimi/njim (they/with them/to them). Now if you want to say: I want to help them - you don’t use ‘njim’ but ‘jim’. (Želim jim pomagati; Pomagati jim želim.)

spanish/español/castilano/castellano

  • Pronouns that can be written and pronounced:

    • Ella/la/-a (binary feminine): “Ella es la niña linda”
    • Él/el/-o (binary masculine): “Él es el niño lindo”
    • Elle/le/-e (neutral): “Elle es le niñe linde”
    • Ello/lo/-o (neutral, similarly to the english ‘it’ can be very offensive so please be careful and don’t use it unless you are told to do so): “Ello es lo niño lindo”
    • Elli/li/-i (neutral, cacophonic and uncommon): “Elli es li niñi lindi”
    • Ellu/lu/-u (neutral, cacophonic and uncommon): “Ellu es lu niñu lindu”

    Pronouns that can be written but not pronounced:

    • Ellx/lx/-x: “Ellx es lx chicx lindx” (I don’t know who told you otherwise, but this can be used by both poc and white folks)
    • Ell*/l*/-*: “Ell* es l* niñ* lind*”
    • Ell@/l@/-@: “Ell@ es l@ niñ@ lind@”
    • Ell_/l_/-_: “Ell_ es l_ niñ_ lind_”
    • Ellæ/læ/-æ: “Ellæ es læ niñæ lindæ”

swedish/svenska

  • hen/hen(henom)/hens(henoms) - variations are in parentheses, gender-neutral third person personal pronouns
  • den/den/dens (dess) (means ‘it’)
  • de/dem (dom)/deras

tagalog

  • Singular/Plural siya/sila (they) niya/nila (them/their) (sa) kanya/(sa) kanila (theirs/preposition them)

turkish/türkçe

  • o/onlar

welsh/cymraeg/y gymraeg

  • nhw/nhw/eu

I understand how “women and femmes” caught on, because there was a desire to describe a group of people associated through the general lens of womanhood/misogyny/lesbianism when some of those people are non-binary or otherwise not strictly identified as women

But the thing is:

1) this usage distances the word femme from it’s specifically lesbian connotation and history

2) and it alienates butch and gnc women by the implicit association of womanhood and femininity (this, when the phrase is not explicitly used in an argument that ‘masculine people’ exert power over ‘feminine people’)

and like… ultimately it’s an incredibly lazy, vague shorthand that does not really represent a cohesive group of people yet somehow still manages to throw a ton of women and nb woman-aligned people under the bus because they don’t fall under some bullshit umbrella of feminity

What wakes me up in the morning:

Is seeing Jimin beat his pre-debut demons and insecurities and grow to become one of Korea’s most respected stage performers that many young idols even look up to.

Is seeing Namjoon go from not loving himself to loving all his faults and transcending that love through all genders, race, colour and language.

Is seeing Jungkook go from shy, reserved and quiet to making friends, learning English to speak with I-fans and getting to perform with his idols.

Is seeing Yoongi fight his battles with mental health issues and using his struggles to express some of the most inspiring and influential songs in kpop history.

Is seeing Seokjin underestimate us all by singing, dancing, playing instruments, going to events and awards shows all while graduating university, proving he is more than just looks but a role model

Is seeing Taehyung be ridiculed, hated and bashed for being different to being the reason of joy, happiness and laughter for all those who have experienced losses in their life

Is seeing Hoseok who despite being bashed for his looks and having low-self confidence continually looks to make others happy, smile and laugh. Calling himself Hope because he wants be to the light in everyone’s life.

I had a heck of a time capturing this and maybe someone’s already posted a better version, but I thought this was a super interesting bit of dialogue re: asari and gender.

[[transcript since holo-Jien insisted on talking over them:
asari: Yes, the gender binary of other races is irrelevant to us.
angara: I’ve been using feminine pronouns this entire time. Should I-
asari: In my case it’s fine to continue. Thank you for asking, I appreciate it. Some asari prefer male pronouns, while others gravitate toward gender-neutral where language allows.
angara: My people have several pronouns to identify themselves with. Perhaps I should prepare a document.
asari: Please do.]]

anonymous asked:

How do I tell someone I'm non-binary in Japanese?

if you just want to say “i’m non-binary”, you could say:

日: (僕・私・自分は)Xジェンダーです。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) x-jendaa desu.
en: i’m non-binary.

note that the first part of the sentence is in parenthesis because in Japanese it’s common to drop the subject of the sentence, even though that isn’t the case in English.

that said, if you want to be more specific (and if any of these happen to describe you), you could also say something like:

日: (僕・私・自分は) 無性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) musei desu.
en: i’m genderless / agender.

日: (僕・私・自分は) 中性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) chuusei desu.
en: i’m gender neutral /  an androgyne.

日: (僕・私・自分は) 両性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) ryousei desu.
en: i’m bigender / ambigender.

日: (僕・私・自分は)不定性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) futeisei desu.
en: i’m genderfluid.

the above gender identities are relatively common among non-binary people in Japan. note that 中性 / chuusei can potentially translate into two different genders in English. i’d say it’s commonly used to mean androgyne within the non-binary community, but there’s also a strong association with gender neutrality because 中性的 / chuuseiteki is often used within society in general to mean unisex or gender neutral.

having said all that, just like when speaking English, the person you’re talking to may not be familiar with the above words. in that case, you might need or want to explain what being non-binary means for you.

日: (僕・私・自分は) 男性でも女性でもないです。
jp:  (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei demo josei demo nai desu.
en: i’m neither male nor female.

日: (僕・私・自分は) 男性でも女性でもなく、性別はないです。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei demo josei demo naku, seibetsu wa nai desu.
en: i’m neither male nor female. i have no gender.

日: (僕・私・自分は)男性と女性の間の性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei to josei no aida no sei desu.
en: my gender is in between male and female.

日: (僕・私・自分は) 男性でもあり女性でもある性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei demo ari josei demo aru sei desu.
en: i’m both male and female.

日:(僕・私・自分は)男性でも女性でもなく、ある性別の間に性自認が変わります
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei demo josei demo naku, aru seibetsu no aida ni seijinin ga kawarimasu.
en: i’m neither male nor female, my gender identity changes from gender to gender.

日:(僕・私・自分は)男性でも女性でもなく、 いずれも全く関係ない性です。
jp: (boku / watashi / jibun wa) dansei demo josei demo naku, izuremo mattaku kankei nai sei desu.
en: i’m neither male nor female. my gender is completely unrelated to either of those genders.

……..and i totally took this relatively simple ask and ran away with it. oh well. hopefully it helps you, anon. either way, this post is officially my *points at this* post for future asks. lol

When you call a woman a “girl”, you reinforce the infantilization of women as helpless, irrational, weak beings in need of protection. A diminutive term, “girl” denies a woman her adulthood, her maturity and her power. Notice the frequency in which we call men “men” or “guys” but call women “girls”. This is no coincidence. This use of language is rooted in sexism and it is disrespectful, patronizing and disempowering. A woman is not a female child. Stop calling women “girls”.

Feminism isn’t a hot air balloon designed to lift already privileged ladies to new joyful heights. Those women are thinking of “girl power” or “bootyliciousness” or “domestic feminism”—some other term that was intended to act as a milquetoast substitute for actual feminism. Feminism is a life raft. Unlike “girl power,” feminism is scary, because it demands change, and does not just entail sexily singing that women are terrific.