everydayfeminism.com
5 Reasons Why We Need to Stop Saying That 'Women Are Half the World’s Population'
You’d think saying that “half the world are women” is a good case for women’s rights – except that this language hurts all of us in the end. Here’s why.

Feminists, I have a pet peeve that I really want to talk about. Namely, this business about women being half the population.

Have you heard this before? An activist is explaining why focusing on women’s rights is so necessary, and as they passionately make their case, they tack onto the end of their speech, “After all, women make up half the world’s population!”

And of course, there’s agreement all around – we can’t perpetuate an injustice against half of the world. That simply won’t do!

I’m not a woman, but I understand the impulse to advocate for women by pointing out just how many women there are. No doubt, it’s compelling to talk about the sheer number of people being denied their autonomy and human rights.

The more people suffering, the greater the injustice, right?

Here’s the thing: I believe in intersectional feminism. I sure hope you do, too. I don’t see this “women are half the world” thing as being intersectional, nor do I see it as being correct.

And perhaps most importantly, I don’t see it as a step in the right direction: It marginalizes other people in a heck of a lot of ways, trying to uplift women at the expense of others – specifically people of marginalized gender and sex.

Not cool.

When I was a wee baby feminist – name-dropping bell hooks in conversation and proudly displaying my new nose ring – I didn’t realize how ineffective and harmful it was to hinge my arguments about women’s rights on a percentage.

It didn’t occur to me until I began my gender transition, living now as a genderqueer trans guy, that the phrase started to rub me the wrong way – because it erased transgender people like me, for starters.

That’s why I’m writing this article.

If we want to make a case for women’s equality around the world, we need to do it in a way that doesn’t erase or harm people of other genders and identities. We need to be bringing in a more intersectional approach.

It’s time we did away with this talking point once and for all. Because as you’ll see, it’s not doing women – or anyone else, for that matter – any favors.

Here are five things to consider the next time you’re thinking of spouting off the “women are half the world” argument.

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Binary gendered language is one of those things that often goes unnoticed even at churches that are trying to be LGBTQ inclusive. Breaking the binary is a simple change that can make a difference.

How might you incorporate this language into your prayers, sermons, and church activities? 

(Source: Look Different via Latina Rebel)

 the makeup a person wears does not indicate their gender (◡‿◡✿) 

 a person’s hair length/style does not indicate their gender (◕‿◕✿)

fashion expression and style do not indicate a person's gender (⊙‿⊙✿)

just because someone is wearing clothing or styles normally associated with one binary gender  by society does not mean they are that gender

  • Stop excluding trans men from your feminism posts 
  • Stop excluding trans women from your feminism posts 
  • Stop excluding non-binary people from your feminism posts 
  • Stop assuming someone’s gender by their appearance when you reblog something
  • Stop erasing the trans community, period

Check out Assigned Male a phenomenal trans/ non binary friendly comic by Sophia Labelle 

latina.com
Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain
Has the word "Latinx" ever come across your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram?

The letter “x,” instead of say an “o” or an “a,” is not a typo. In fact, that final letter is very intentional. The “x” makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.

latina.com
Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain

Has the word “Latinx” ever come across your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram? The letter “x,” instead of say an “o” or an “a,” is not a typo. In fact, that final alphabet is very intentional.

The “x” makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.

Latinx, pronounced “La-teen-ex,” includes the numerous people of Latin American descent whose gender identities fluctuate along different points of the spectrum, from agender or nonbinary to gender non-conforming, genderqueer and genderfluid.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s why people who identify as Latinx resonate with the term.

You know how the gender binary is so strong that people assign pets to masculine and feminine traits?  So dogs are seen as masculine, and cats are seen (and sexualized) as feminine.  Despite the fact that they’re, oh, for starters, two distinct species.

I just had a conversation that was even more surreal, and that I can only hope is not mainstream:

Apparently, according to this man, fossil fuels are masculine!  And renewables like solar and wind are, therefore, feminine! 

This was said in response to me talking about wanting to put solar panels on my (hypothetical) future home, and him interrupting, saying that he didn’t want a “girly house” and that I should just go get a gas-powered generator in the next aisle over (we were in Home Depot). 

A short conversation ensued, with me being rather, and increasingly, incredulous as it went on, as this fellow tried to impose his (literally toxic) view of masculinity on me, and eventually just started swearing at me (using gendered slurs) for failing to conform.  That part I wasn’t surprised by; it’s not the first time I’ve had such arguments with men whose masculinity is as fragile as spun glass and the only way they have of buttressing it is by imposing it on others. 

No, the part that has me going “buh?” is seeing the extension the gender binary view to infrastructure.