geechee girl

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Celebrate black history month by watching the works of these 10 history-making directors

1 to 5:

Amma Asante 

Best Known For: Winning a BAFTA award for Best Debut Feature for A Way of Life, directing indie hit Belle 10 years later. 

Notable Works: Belle (2014)A United Kingdom (2016)

Forthcoming: Where Hands Touch (2017)

Ava DuVernay 

Best Known For: Being the first black woman to win Best Director at Sundance, the first black woman to be nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Director and being the first black woman to direct a movie nominated for Best Picture at the Oscars. 

Notable Works: Middle of Nowhere (2012), Selma (2014)

Forthcoming: A Wrinkle in Time (2018)

Julie Dash 

Best Known For: Being the first black American woman to have a feature length film be theatrically distributed in the U.S.

Notable Works: Daughters of the Dust (1991)

Forthcoming: Travel Notes of a Geechee Girl (2016)

Safi Faye 

Best Known For: This Senagalese woman became the first Sub-Saharan woman to have a film be commercially distributed in 1976. 

Notable Works: Letter From My Village (1976), Mossane (1996)

Forthcoming: N/A.

Kasi Lemmons 

Best Known For: With all four of her feature films released theatrically in the U.S. she currently holds the record as the black woman director with the most commercially distributed films. 

Notable Works: Eve’s Bayou (1997) 

Forthcoming: Agaat, On Beauty

CLICK HERE FOR DIRECTORS 6-10

Julie Dash’s feature debut, a regionally-specific, vividly-populated, and spectacularly shot look at the Geechee residents who inhabit South Carolina’s lushly rustic Gullah coast during the turn of the twentieth century, is, quite simply, one of the greatest films ever made. It’s also infuriatingly difficult to locate. Dash’s groundbreaking indie drama (the first feature film helmed by an African-American woman to receive theatrical distribution) centers around an extraordinary ensemble of women, including Babara O, Cora Lee Day, and Kaycee Moore, among many others, who enact three generations of an embattled Gullah family to cinematic perfection.

Few of these actresses remain active today, but Daughters spotlights them to stunning and superior effect. They each give vibrant flesh and blood to an astonishing yet widely unknown piece of history that’s illuminated not with studious simplification but a spellbinding form of cinematic immersion. Daughters of the Dust is by turns moving and mysterious, yet never less than magnificent.” — Matthew Eng

5 Woman-Directed Films That Pass the DuVernay and Bechdel Tests

(Source: tribecafilm.com)