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MASTER POST OF COMPLETE LIST OF EGYPTIAN DIETIES

List of deities

Aker – A god of the earth and the horizon[3]
Ammit – goddess who devoured condemned souls[4]
Amenhotep son of Hapu – A scribe and architect in the court of Amenhotep III, later deified for his wisdom[5]
Am-heh – A dangerous underworld god[5]
Amun – A creator god, patron deity of the city of Thebes, and the preeminent deity in Egypt during the New Kingdom[6]
Amunet – Female counterpart of Amun and a member of the Ogdoad[3]
Anat – A war and fertility goddess, originally from Syria, who entered Egyptian religion in the Middle Kingdom[7]
Anhur – A god of war and hunting[8]
Anti – Falcon god, worshipped in Middle Egypt,[9] who appears in myth as a ferryman for greater gods[10]
Anubis – god of embalming and protector of the dead[11]
Anuket – A goddess of Egypt’s southern frontier regions, particularly the lower cataracts of the Nile[12]
Apedemak – A warlike lion god from Nubia who appears in some Egyptian-built temples in Lower Nubia[13]
Apep – A serpent deity who personified malevolent chaos and was said to fight Ra in the underworld every night[14]
Apis – A live bull worshipped as a god at Memphis and seen as a manifestation of Ptah[15]
Arensnuphis – A Nubian deity who appears in Egyptian temples in Lower Nubia in the Greco-Roman era[16]
Ash – A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[17]
Astarte – A warrior goddess from Syria and Canaan who entered Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[18]
Aten – Sun disk deity who became the focus of the monolatrous or monotheistic Atenist belief system in the reign of Akhenaten[19]
Atum – A creator god and solar deity, first god of the Ennead[20]
Baal – Sky and storm god from Syria and Canaan, worshipped in Egypt during the New Kingdom[21]
Ba'alat Gebal – A Caananite goddess, patroness of the city of Byblos, adopted into Egyptian religion[22]
Babi – A baboon god characterized by sexuality and aggression[23]
Banebdjedet – A ram god, patron of the city of Mendes[24]
Ba-Pef – A little-known underworld deity[25]
Bast – Goddess represented as a cat or lioness, patroness of the city of Bubastis, linked with fertility and protection from evil[26]
Bat – Cow goddess from early in Egyptian history, eventually absorbed by Hathor[27]
Bennu – A solar and creator deity, depicted as a bird[28]
Bes – Apotropaic god, represented as a dwarf, particularly important in protecting children and women in childbirth[29]
Buchis – A live bull god worshipped in the region around Thebes and a manifestation of Montu[30]
Dedun – A Nubian god, said to provide the Egyptians with incense and other resources that came from Nubia[31]
Geb – An earth god and member of the Ennead[32]
Ha – A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[33]
Hapi – Personification of the Nile flood[33]
Hathor – One of the most important goddesses, linked with the sky, the sun, sexuality and motherhood, music and dance, foreign lands and goods, and the afterlife. One of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[34]
Hatmehit – Fish goddess worshipped at Mendes[35]
Hedetet – A minor scorpion goddess[36]
Heh – Personification of infinity and a member of the Ogdoad[35]
Heka – Personification of magic[37]
Heket – Frog goddess said to protect women in childbirth[38]
Heryshaf – Ram god worshipped at Herakleopolis Magna[39]
Hesat – A maternal cow goddess[40]
Horus – A major god, usually shown as a falcon or as a human child, linked with the sky, the sun, kingship, protection, and healing. Often said to be the son of Osiris and Isis.[41]
Hu – Personification of the authority of the spoken word[42]
Iah – A moon god[43]
Iat – A goddess of milk and nursing[44]
Ihy – A child deity born to Horus and Hathor, representing the music and joy produced by the sistrum[45]
Imentet – An afterlife goddess closely linked with Isis and Hathor[46]
Imhotep – Architect and vizier to Djoser, eventually deified as a healer god[47]
Ishtar – The East Semitic version of Astarte, occasionally mentioned in Egyptian texts[48]
Isis – Wife of Osiris and mother of Horus, linked with funerary rites, motherhood, protection, and magic. She became a major deity in Greek and Roman religion.[49]
Iusaaset – A female counterpart to Atum[50]
Khepri – A solar creator god, often treated as the morning form of Ra and represented by a scarab beetle[51]
Kherty – A netherworld god, usually depicted as a ram[52]
Khnum – A ram god, the patron deity of Elephantine, who was said to control the Nile flood and give life to gods and humans[53]
Khonsu – A moon god, son of Amun and Mut[54]
Maahes – A lion god, son of Bastet[55]
Maat – goddess who personified truth, justice, and order[56]
Mafdet – A predatory goddess said to destroy dangerous creatures[57]
Mandulis – A Lower Nubian solar deity who appeared in some Egyptian temples[58]
Mehit – A lioness goddess, consort of Anhur[59]
Menhit – A lioness goddess[59]
Mehen – A serpent god who protects the barque of Ra as it travels through the underworld[60]
Mehet-Weret – A celestial cow goddess[60]
Meretseger – A cobra goddess who oversaw the Theban Necropolis[61]
Meskhenet – A goddess who presided over childbirth[62]
Min – A god of virility, as well as the cities of Akhmim and Qift and the Eastern Desert beyond them[63]
Mnevis – A live bull god worshipped at Heliopolis as a manifestation of Ra[64]
Montu – A god of war and the sun, worshipped at Thebes[65]
Mut – Consort of Amun, worshipped at Thebes[66]
Nebethetepet – A female counterpart to Atum[67]
Nefertum – god of the lotus blossom from which the sun god rose at the beginning of time. Son of Ptah and Sekhmet.[67]
Nehebu-Kau – A protective serpent god[68]
Nehmetawy – A minor goddess, the consort of Nehebu-Kau or Thoth[69]
Neith – A creator and hunter goddess, patron of the city of Sais in Lower Egypt[70]
Nekhbet – A vulture goddess, the tutelary deity of Upper Egypt[71]
Neper – A god of grain[72]
Nephthys – A member of the Ennead, the consort of Set, who mourned Osiris alongside Isis[73]
Nu – Personification of the formless, watery disorder from which the world emerged at creation and a member of the Ogdoad[74]
Nut – A sky goddess, a member of the Ennead[75]
Osiris – god of death and resurrection who rules the underworld and enlivens vegetation, the sun god, and deceased souls[76]
Pakhet – A lioness goddess mainly worshipped in the area around Beni Hasan[77]
Ptah – A creator deity and god of craftsmen, the patron god of Memphis[78]
Qetesh – A goddess of sexuality and sacred ecstasy from Syria and Canaan, adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[79]
Ra – the foremost Egyptian sun god, involved in creation and the afterlife. Mythological ruler of the gods, father of every Egyptian king, and the patron god of Heliopolis.[80]
Raet-Tawy – A female counterpart to Ra[81]
Renenutet – An agricultural goddess[82]
Reshep – A Syrian war god adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[83]
Renpet – goddess who personified the year[81]
Satet – A goddess of Egypt’s southern frontier regions[84]
Seker – god of the Memphite Necropolis and of the afterlife in general[85]
Sekhmet – A lioness goddess, both destructive and violent and capable of warding off disease. The consort of Ptah and one of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[86]
Serapis – A Greco-Egyptian god from the Ptolemaic Period who fused traits of Osiris and Apis with those of several Greek gods. Husband of Isis who, like her, was adopted into Greek and Roman religion outside Egypt.[87]
Serket – A scorpion goddess, invoked for healing and protection[88]
Seshat – goddess of writing and record-keeping, depicted as a scribe[89]
Set – An ambivalent god, characterized by violence, chaos, and strength, connected with the desert. Mythological murderer of Osiris and enemy of Horus, but also a supporter of the king.[90]
Shai – Personification of fate[91]
Shed – A god believed to save people from danger and misfortune[92]
Shesmetet – A lioness goddess[92]
Shezmu – A god of wine and oil presses who also slaughters condemned souls[93]
Shu – embodiment of wind or air, a member of the Ennead[94]
Sia – Personification of perception[95]
Sobek – Crocodile god, worshipped in the Faiyum and at Kom Ombo[96]
Sopdu – A god of the sky and of Egypt’s eastern border regions[97]
Sopdet – Deification of the star Sirius[98]
Ta-Bitjet – A minor scorpion goddess[99]
Tatenen – Personification of the first mound of earth to emerge from chaos in ancient Egyptian creation myths[99]
Taweret – Hippopotamus goddess, protector of women in childbirth[100]
Tefnut – Goddess of moisture and a member of the Ennead[101]
Thoth – A moon god, and a god of writing and scribes, and patron deity of Hermopolis[102]
Tutu – An apotropaic god from the Greco-Roman era[103]
Unut – A goddess represented as a snake or a hare, worshipped in the region of Hermopolis[104]
Wadjet – A cobra goddess, the tutelary deity of Lower Egypt[105]
Wadj-wer – Personification of the Mediterranean sea or lakes of the Nile Delta[106]
Weneg – A son of Ra who maintains cosmic order[106]
Wepwawet – A jackal god, the patron deity of Asyut, connected with warfare and the afterlife[107]
Werethekau – A goddess who protected the king[108]
Wosret – A minor goddess of Thebes[109]
Yam – A Syrian god of the sea who appears in some Egyptian texts[110]

4

Astarte/Ashtoreth

A Grecian version of the Babylonian goddess Ishtar who has been worshiped since the age of bronze. She was known as a being with sway over war and fertility as well as possibly being the morning or evening star. At some point, she may have been merged with an ancient Cypriot goddess to become Aphrodite and figureheads of her are said to have started the tradition of sailing ships having a figure hanging from the front of the ship.

To the Canaanites she was known as Ashtart who was the lover of Ba’al and therefore was the goddess of the moon. When Ba’al attempted to overthrow the river god called Yam, it was Ashtart who restrained him with the help of Anath. When Ba’al killed the god, she cursed him by speaking his true name. Later on, the two were said to have a daughter named Yabarodmay. Some say she was also the goddess called Athirat but this was probably the result of various scribal errors over the centuries.

In very old Hebrew lore, she may have been one of the wives of Solomon whom worshiped her alongside many others. Eventually over time it is possible she was demonized into the male demon Astaroth though this could also have been Ishtar. To Egyptians, she was a consort of Set and one of the daughters of Ra and was sometimes identified as Sekhmet and Isis.

In the old Phoenician religion of the Semitics, she was the daughter of Epigeius and the sister of the supreme god Elus. When Elus overthrew his father, Epigeius sent his three ‘virgin’ daughters, Asherah, Astarte and Ba’al Gebal as a trick. Elus saw through the trick however, and married all three of them. Astarte herself would give Elus seven daughters who were named the same as seven female titans from Greek mythology as well as two sons, Pothos and Eros. Much later, she would become a consort of Hedad and rule over the land with Elus’s permission.

She was depicted as often being naked, and her symbols are the lion, the horse, the sphinx and the dove. An ancient Minoan topless snake goddess who has no name is also believed by some scholars to have been her.

Set once more regrouped His allies, but Isis marched against them. She concealed Herself in Gebal which is south of Dunanwi, after having made Her transformation into Her Mother Sekhmet. She sent out a flame against them all, seeing to it that they were burned and devoured by Her flame. (It is said to Her, “Hathor, Mistress of the Two Braziers.”) She [Isis] created for Herself there, a place to observe the preparations of the Evil One and His allies. (It is said to Her, “The Temple of the Mistress of the Two Braziers,” and the wab priest of this Goddess is called Ouroumem [the Great Devourer].) Then Set, seeing Isis at Her observation point, transformed Himself into a bull to chase Her, but She made Herself unrecognizable and put on the form of a bitch with a knife at the end of Her tail. Then She began to chase Him, and Set couldn’t trap Her again. So He scattered His semen upon the earth, and Isis said, “It is an abomination to have scattered Your semen like this, O Bull.” His semen grew, in Gebal, in the plants which we call bdd-k3w. Then the Goddess entered into the mountain which we call Hout-Kâhet, and settled Herself there. After which, She went to the north and, having transformed Herself into a serpent, She entered into that mountain which is north of this nome to spy on the allies of Set as they arrived in the evening. (It is said to Her, “Hathor, Mistress of Geheset.”) The Goddess [Isis] watched the allies of Set as they arrived in the Oxyrhynchite Nome and as they crossed the country to reach Gebal, the City in the East. She pierced them all [with Her fangs as She was in the form of a serpent], and She made Her venom penetrate into their flesh, so that they perished, all together; their blood poured out upon the mountain, and this is why this mountain is called the prsh of Geheset.
—  Isis the Fierce