gay run

Good morning gay sex is completely healthy and natural and gay people shouldn’t have to feel dirty or ashamed for having or wanting sex. It’s healthy and natural for a girl to fantasise about having sex with another girl, or for a boy to fantasise about having sex with another boy, and they aren’t predatory for doing so ✨

the art of saying no was a numbing in our mouths. we learned how to form it gently, to swallow the punch, to let down with gentlest hands. we learned how to fake a smile, to force a chuckle, to take disgust and turn it into polite denial, to take fear and weigh our options and submit. 

he said he needed sex because oh it hurt how we made him. he said we should have just smiled back at him. he said that we could have learned karate to fight them. he said that we couldn’t say no, he was our boyfriend. 

how many girls are raised to feel guilty for no. we feel it must come with a reason. our no has to have qualifications. if our no isn’t enough, we are expected to cave in. 

the battle of our inner strength and our outer bodies. how we calculate small injustice versus our personal safety. how we’d form no in small ways that made him feel like it was our fault. how we’d let him down in a way he wouldn’t follow us home. we’d say no without the words; lying about sudden appointments or phone calls, we’d invent husbands, we’d suddenly become best friends with the woman beside us. we always had someone waiting at home for us - usually big and angry - who would notice if we were missing. we enter in our phone numbers with the last two digits switched. we say we’re going to the bathroom we’ll be right back before we take off running. 

and our no, those two letters, was never good enough. we either rejected him too harshly or not clearly. if we said no, we weren’t in love. the no was too forceful, the no was too gentle. the no meant ask nicely, the no meant keep persisting. the no was because we’re all catty and cruel and hate nice men. the no was because we’re all paranoid bitches. the no was wait long enough and it’s a yes. the no was playing hard to get.

and our life was learning. it amazes me sometimes when men tell me, “but she never said no” and i hear her story. how he was her boss and she would lose her job and it was her everything. how he said no but men aren’t allowed to refuse these things. i was thirteen the first time i had to spend a two hour train ride gently turning down a middle-aged man and someone else told me i should have just screamed or hit him or done something. how the girls i told all nodded solemnly because they know what it’s like to be thirteen and scared and to be eighteen and scared and how to be twenty-three and scared. because we’ve all said no and had it blow up in our faces. we’ve watched men turn from flirty to aggressive. we’ve seen what happens to our friends.

but in the end it’s our fault. don’t you know a man can’t take rejection.

most of us know how important representation is, but i feel like we don’t always realize how vital it is for white cishet people to see representation as well. like my white cishet 65 year old mom’s favorite show is brooklyn nine nine, and when she first began watching it she was so perplexed by ray holt. she had never really seen black gay characters in television before, and the very few times she has they were stereotypes, so she was just so interested by him bc “gay people can be like this?”

like obviously it would be great if she already knew lgbt+ people aren’t the tired stereotypes that society tries to portray us as, and it would be great if she was more educated that Yes black gay men exist and are common. but she didn’t know that, because she’s never really seen it. but just watching brooklyn nine nine has educated her so much!! she’s seeing a black gay man run a police squad, she’s seeing a large black man be one of the most gentle people ever, she’s seeing women of color empowering each other and totally kicking ass, she’s seeing a jewish man repeatedly talking about issues such as transphobia, homophobia, anti-semitism, racism, and she’s also seeing all these characters understand when it ISNT their place to talk about certain issues

so my mom sees stuff like this and thinks “oh i was so wrong about these groups” and then she recommends these types of shows to her other ignorant friends, and she also corrects people when they say bigoted things that enforce the toxic stereotypes she is now educated on. all from some proper representation on a half-hour tv show!! like representation doesn’t just help minorities, it helps the privileged people who have ingrained bigotry in them to see what minorities are really like and what they can be and it’s so important!! and then these privilaged people can move forward and use their privilege to try and help minorities. representation of minorities helps the privileged too, and helps society to evolve!! so can bigots stop saying that it only benefits minorities. even if it did only help minorities that wouldn’t be a bad thing, but that isn’t the case so?? stop??

my angel an amberprice playlist

spark - amber run // taking you there - broods // cocoon - catfish and the bottlemen // 1965 - zella day // walking disasters - the wombats // first time - vance joy // no below - speedy oritz // like real people do - hozier // american money - børns // heal - tom odell // oblivion - bastille // all i want - kodaline // the night we met - lord huron // mountains - message to bears

Alternative Names for each JoJo part
  • Part 1: Fuck Off Dio
  • Part 2: Bromantic Eurotrip
  • Part 3: Fuck Off Dio 2: Electric Boogaloo
  • Part 4: We Dem Boyz
  • Part 5: Gay Mafia Squad
  • Part 6: Escape From Florida City
  • Part 7: The Big Gay Horse Trip
  • Part 8: The Boys Are Back In Town