gato por liebre

anonymous asked:

Are there any idiomatic expressions that are used specifically or mostly in Spain?

Oh, gosh. I’m not sure how many I know that are exclusive to Spain. I’ll list some that I know, but many of these might actually be universal.

Idiomatic Expressions (I don’t know if they’re all universal or just Spain’s):

  • contigo pan y cebolla = “through thick or thin”… it literally means “with you bread and onion” which are cheap foods… it means something like “I love you so much even though we don’t have any money”
  • dar gato por liebre = “the old bait-and-switch”… it means “to give someone a cat in place of a rabbit” because people used to sell and cheat people by giving them cats in a bag in place of rabbits/hares, or pigs. That’s why in English we have the expression “let the cat out of the bag”… dar gato por liebre means “to cheat someone”
  • hay gato encerrado aquí = “something’s not quite right here…” it means “there’s a cat in here”, meaning “I’m suspicious of this” so it’s connected to the one above.
  • dejar a cuadros = “to have no reaction / to be completely blank”
  • salvar los muebles = “to dodge a bullet”… literally it’s “to save the furniture” and you say it when you just narrowly avoid total disaster
  • ir al grano = “get down to business” / “get to the heart of the matter”
  • irse / andar por los cerros de Úbeda = “to go rambling on and on”; the opposite of ir al grano.
    [“to go through the hills of Úbeda”; this expression comes from a battle during the Spanish Reconquista; where there was a battle near Úbeda, and the king and his troops disappeared during the battle. When they finally showed up again he explained that he’d “gotten turned around in the hill of Úbeda”… so now it means “to digress” or “go on a tangent”]

Some very Spain expressions:

  • ¡Venga, tío! - Come on, man!
  • ¡Cómo mola, chaval! - Dude, that’s so cool!
  • Eso (me) mola muchísimo. - I really love that.
  • No me mola. - I don’t care for that.
  • ¡Qué guay! - Awesome!
  • Es muy chulo/a - That’s so cool/nice
  • ¡Vamos, campeón! - Come on, big man! [campeón / campeona = “champion” / “champ”]
  • Esos mamones… - Those jerks… [mamón / mamones = “jerks”, “idiots” or “a-holes”… either actual criminals or directed towards big government or paid officials, corruption… etc.]
  • Los mozos = Boys [Young-ish]
  • Las mozas = Girls [Young-ish]
  • terco/a = stubborn / idiot
  • tercuzo/a = stubborn / idiot [related to terco/a]
  • estar de mala leche = to be in a REALLY bad mood
  • estar hecho/a polvo = to be exhausted / beat up [lit. “to be turned to dust”]
  • coger = to pick up / to grab [NOT USED IN LATIN AMERICA… at least not this way]

Expressions I’m not completely sure are just Spain’s, but just in case…

  • Un nene / Una nena = A guy / A chick [nene is a kind of term of endearment type thing… like “babe” but for men; la nena is more often used for “girls” or “chicks” etc. ……I’m fairly certain that this is universal, but just in case it’s not
  • Guapetón / Bombón = A very attractive man [augmentatives of guapo and bomba]
  • Es un picaflor. - He’s a womanizer. [el picaflor is another way of saying colibrí… “hummingbird”, but literally it’s “pricks flowers” so…]

Also common in Spain is that words ending in -ado sometimes become -ao in spoken Spanish.

And words ending in -ada are sometimes an emphatic -á sound. 

If any other Spaniards have things to add, please do so!

EDIT: And of course, Spain is famous for vale meaning “okay”.

anonymous asked:

Hola canela! Saludos. Podrías recomendar un buen mezcal que se pueda encontrar en EU?

Hola! la neta no sé porque nunca he andado por allí ni tengo idea de cuales vendan pero te recomiendo estos esperando que los halles:

Pierde Almas

Alipús

Wahaka

Siete Misterios

O cualquier “picoso” y artesanal de Oaxaca. Checa en las etiquetas que diga que está elaborado de forma tradicional pa que no te den gato por liebre, que sea completamente blanco y que tenga etiqueta de denominación de origen para que te asegures que sea mexicano.

¡Salucita!

SHIPPERS DE WIGETTA... TENEMOS UNA ULTIMA OPORTUNIDAD... EXIJAMOS NUESTRA BODA WIGETTA

COMPAÑERAS Y COMPAÑEROS SHIPPERS… SOLO NOS QUEDA 1 CAPITULO PARA LA BODA QUE NOS QUEDO PENDIENTE DE LA TEMPORADA ANTERIOR…

MAÑANA (O el martes ya que supuesta-mente tienen que preparar el capitulo)

tenemos que unir fuerzas para reclamar lo prometido…

QUE NO NOS DEN GATO POR LIEBRE…  TAMPOCO UNA DE CAL Y UNA DE ARENA…

NO QUEREMOS REGALOS CONSUELO… QUEREMOS LA MALDITA BODA WIGETTA… ENTRE EL SEÑOR WILLYREX Y EL SEÑOR VEGETTA (me salio una rima )

TODOS ESPERAMOS PACIENTEMENTE TODA LA TEMPORADA… YA NO VAMOS  SER TAN SUMIS@S

MAÑANA QUEREMOS TRENDIGN TOPIC  #BODAWIGETTA

Ok se me va la olla pero tenia que hacerlo… necesito la boda

ME VENDIERON GATO POR LIEBRE -.-

Me prometieron que con Willy en España iba a haber salseo del bueno… Que si momentos wigetta, que si fotito wigetta, que si cenita, que si pulseras…

y lo único que recibo es un nuevo compañero que lleva gatos al departamento de Willy… Y QUE ABUZA DEL PUTO MINION 

OLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE (Yo me siento como alexby)

-.- Me voy al mundo de los sueños

-.-

-.-

-.-

Me dieron gato por liebre.

Translation: I was given cat instead of hare, meaning I was duped.

Example: I told them I wanted a vacation in the Caribbean, but they sent me to the Jersey shore! I was given cat instead of hare.

**History note: My husband said that this saying originated from when vendors would try to pass off skinned cats for hares, which cost more. After doing some internet sleuthing, we have discovered this is actually a saying from Spain from the medieval era, where hunters would try to trick innkeepers to sell cat instead of hares! And because of Spain, it passed through Latin America—evidently, Chileans and Argentinians also use this phrase. It came back into fashion during the World Wars, since food was scarce. So, the more you know!