gasparo

5

Bedroom from the Sagredo Palace

c.1718

Italy

In design and workmanship, this bedroom, consisting of an antechamber with a bed alcove, is one of the finest of its period. The decoration is in stucco and carved wood. In the antechamber, fluted Corinthian pilasters support an entablature out of which fly amorini bearing garlands of flowers. Other amorini bear the gilded frame of a painting by Gasparo Diziani, depicting dawn triumphant over night. Above the entry to the alcove seven amorini frolic, holding a shield with the monogram of Zaccaria Sagredo. A paneled wood dado with a red-and-white marble base runs around the room. The unornamented portions of the walls are covered with seventeenth-century brocatelle. The bed alcove has its original marquetry floor. The stuccowork was probably done by Abondio Statio and Carpoforo Mazetti. The amorini are beautifully modeled and the arabesques of the doors are exquisitely executed. Everything in this bedroom forms a buoyant and joyful ensemble. (MET)

MET

7

By Anne Leader

Known as the father of Italian vedute (views), Luca Carlevaris died 12 February 1730 in Venice, the city stimulated his artistry and brought him renown. Though now more widely known through his followers Canaletto and Francesco Guardi, vedute, topographical images of towns or landscapes, came to be among the most popular picture type created in 18th-century Venice, especially among English tourists and collectors. His development of the picture type may have been inspired by a trip to Rome in 1698, where he was exposed to souvenir views and capricci (fantasy views) by artists like Gasparo Vanvitelli (Dutch, 1652-1736). He further popularized the genre through the publication of 104 engravings showing views of Venice (Le fabriche e vedute di Venezia disegnate poste in prospettiva et intagliate da Luca Carlevari)

Reference: John Wilson. “Carlevaris, Luca.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press.<http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T014097>.

The Reception of Cardinal César d'Estrées, 1701. Oil on canvas. Amsterdam,
Rijksmuseum

Plate 38: View of the facade of the church of St. Roch and at left the facade of the School of St. Roch, Venice, 1703, from the series ‘The buildings and views of Venice’ (Le fabriche evedute di Venezia). New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Phyllis Massar, 2011

Plate 85: View of the Contarini Palace in Campo San Trovaso, Venice, 1703, from the series 'The buildings and views of Venice’ (Le fabriche e
vedute di Venezia). New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Phyllis Massar, 2011

Piazza San Marco, Venice. ca. 1709. Oil on canvas. New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

The Molo, Venice, from the Bacino di San Marco, ca. 1709. Oil on canvas. New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

The Bacino, Venice, with the Dogana and a Distant View of the Isola di San Giorgio, ca. 1709. Oil on canvas. New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

The Piazzetta at Venice, ca. 1700-10. Oil on canvas, San Diego, Timken Museum of Art, acquired by the Putnam Foundation, 1979