gaslamp-games

Here’s a member of the dev team behind the fantastic  Dungeons of Dredmor shutting down a “get to the kitchen!” joker (read: asshole) on the game’s forums, as detailed here by Tiffany Martin. (Who, it should be noted, is among the badassest of gamers; she beat DoD with the most difficult possible setup when I can’t manage to get through a single playthrough.)

It’s a pretty great look at a single incident of sexism and properly handling it in gaming communities. Temporarily ban the guy as a slap on the wrist with a healthy dose of public shame and calling out this sort of action, all the while playing up women as a proper part of the community.

It’s a fairly beautiful thing.

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OH MY GOD LOOK AT THIS GUYS
IT’S A STEAMPUNK GAME WHERE YOU RUN A COLONY OF AN EMPIRE

AND THERE’S LOVECRAFTIAN HORRORS

AND IT’S BEING DEVELOPED BY THE TEAM THAT MADE DUNGEONS OF DREDMOR WOW

CHECK IT OUT HERE

(also convince them to let me into the beta because hOT DAMN)

And the behaviour can even surprise the developers. They hand wrote that soldiers can get demoralised in battle, Jacobsen explained. And they hand wrote that drinking too much alcohol can cause characters to lose memories. What they hadn’t written is that soldiers who drink too much after battle are the best units, as they can forget the horrors they faced and might be willing to fight again.
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clockwork empires is going to own so much

here’s the devblog if you haven’t been following it

One of my favourite pieces of design advice (taken from a pen & paper design podcast, of all things) is that the stats — in the RPG sense — you provide to a player indicate to them very clearly what the game is about, regardless of what you say the game is about. Eg. If your game is about growing stronger, then strength should be a stat. If it’s about nobility or hope, why aren’t those stats? It need not be that direct. So in other words: Why would your game try to pretend to be about something that isn’t part of the game mechanics?

The act of putting a bunch of complex commodity production chains into Clockwork Empires makes the game, in part, about learning and optimizing complex commodity production chains. This holds intrinsic fascination to people of certain personalities (hi!) but it can get really messy really fast if handled poorly and could well alienate players whose focus is more on something like narrative, combat challenges, or characters.

To provide a specific example: although Dwarf Fortress’s painfully detailed steel production system is really cool on an intellectual level, it’s probably not a good idea for us to replicate it. ( …without certain, ah, optimizations.)

The idea of steel in the game is cool: it’s like a better version of iron. And players are used to this idea of upgrading the materials of items, eg. Minecraft, Terraria, WoW, etc. A player investing capital and resources to create a more advanced material is also really cool game mechanic because it takes mastery of this commodity production chain to unlock more complexity in the form of advanced contructions, vehicles, and weapons that require steel. Having overcome the hurdle of making steel, a player can be presumed to be able to handle the complexity that’s introduced with choices it unlocks.

On fixing the economy of Gaslamp Games’ new game, Clockwork Empires.

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“Brawl” from Dungeons of Dredmore, PC.

Gaslamp Games still wins the award for my favorite game achievement ever, in Dungeons of Dredmor–

“Sewer Brew” - you have to meet the devs in person, have a drink with them, and then they will activate the achievement on your Steam account. 

This has made some completionists angry in the past, but like…it takes a good 500 hours or more to get all the other achievements. At that point, you are either grinding and silly about achievements, or you really love the game. 

After over 800 hours of gameplay, I have 123 out of 124 achievements in Dungeons of Dredmor. One day, I will go to Canada and buy a drink for the cool folks who have brought a lot of fun into my life. 

(This is in addition to their pro-LGBT stance and the talk one of the lead developers gave about humor in video games, in which he condemned rape jokes)

It’s useful to make friends. And they come in all shapes. Some wear pointy helmets. Some are incomprehensible to a sane human mind.
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Gaslamp Games update on Clockwork Empires. 

THIS LOOKS LIKE THE BEST GAME EVER OH MY GOD.

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I’ve been a fan of Gaslamp games ever since I lost myself in Dungeons of Dredmor and also being a fan of H.P Lovecraft has me really excited for the latest project Clockwork Empires. From the trailer the games looks to be a steam punk civilization management game with a cosmic horror edge.  

Over the weekend, I played 14 hours of the world’s first Earliest Access Clockwork Empires.  It’s safe to say that I love it.

It’s a work in progress, and will be better once bugs are fixed and planned features are implemented  At this stage, I’m really impressed what Gaslamp Games have managed to achieve, and I’m anxiously awaiting the next update.

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Who likes city management games YOU DO OF COURSE YOU DO! Here’s Clockwork Empires, a management game in the same vein as Dwarf Fortress, Banished, and Prison Architect. It has a nice steampunk flavor to it, too! Clockwork Empires is being made by Gaslamp Games, the developers who also created Dungeons of Dredmor.

Looking forward to it. I’m a sucker for management games like this.