gas cloud

Cosmic Winter Wonderland : Although there are no seasons in space, this cosmic vista invokes thoughts of a frosty winter landscape. It is, in fact, a region called NGC 6357 where radiation from hot, young stars is energizing the cooler gas in the cloud that surrounds them.

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Recognize that the very molecules that make up your body, the atoms that construct the molecules, are traceable to the crucibles that were once the centers of high mass stars that exploded their chemically rich guts into the galaxy, enriching pristine gas clouds with the chemistry of life. So that we are all connected to each other biologically, to the earth chemically and to the rest of the universe atomically. That’s kinda cool! That makes me smile and I actually feel quite large at the end of that. It’s not that we are better than the universe, we are part of the universe. We are in the universe and the universe is in us.

Cosmic ‘Winter’ Wonderland

Although there are no seasons in space, this cosmic vista invokes thoughts of a frosty winter landscape. It is, in fact, a region called NGC 6357 where radiation from hot, young stars is energizing the cooler gas in the cloud that surrounds them. 

Located in our galaxy about 5,500 light years from Earth, NGC 6357 is actually a “cluster of clusters,” containing at least three clusters of young stars, including many hot, massive, luminous stars. The X-rays from Chandra and ROSAT reveal hundreds of point sources, which are the young stars in NGC 6357, as well as diffuse X-ray emission from hot gas. There are bubbles, or cavities, that have been created by radiation and material blowing away from the surfaces of massive stars, plus supernova explosions.

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/PSU/L. Townsley et al; Optical: UKIRT; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

literally all you learn from the voyager opening credits is that it’s deliberately paced and tom paris is a bad driver

“tom don’t fly the ship through a fucking solar flare”

“tom planetary rings are mostly big ice crystals and they’ll damage the deflector and hull”

“tom we don’t even know what’s in this gas cloud, please don’t ‘hang ten’”

“tom stay away from that-”

“I’M GOING IN”

“TOM NO”

Do you know?
  1. A day on Venus is longer than a year.
  2. 33 light years away there is an exoplanet completely covered in burning ice.
  3. About 275 million new stars are born everyday.
  4. According to astronauts, space smells like seared steak, hot metal, and welding fumes.
  5. Each year the moon moves 3.8 cm further from the Earth.
  6. Earth has over 8,000 pieces of space junk orbiting around it.
  7. Earth’s rotation is slowing at a rate of about 17 milliseconds a century.
  8. Far beyond Neptune, there may be an object the size of Earth orbiting the sun.
  9. If you could compress the Earth down to the size of a marble, it would collapse on itself and become a black hole.
  10. One spoonful of matter from a neutron star would weigh about a billion tons.
  11. There’s a gas cloud in the constellation of Aquila that contains enough alcohol to make 400 trillion trillion pints of beer.
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COSMIC ‘WINTER’ WONDERLAND

Although there are no seasons in space, this cosmic vista invokes thoughts of a frosty winter landscape. It is, in fact, a region called NGC 6357 where radiation from hot, young stars is energizing the cooler gas in the cloud that surrounds them.

This composite image contains X-ray data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and the ROSAT telescope (purple), infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope (orange), and optical data from the SuperCosmos Sky Survey (blue) made by the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope.

Located in our galaxy about 5,500 light-years from Earth, NGC 6357 is actually a “cluster of clusters,” containing at least three clusters of young stars, including many hot, massive, luminous stars. The X-rays from Chandra and ROSAT reveal hundreds of point sources, which are the young stars in NGC 6357, as well as diffuse X-ray emission from hot gas. There are bubbles, or cavities, that have been created by radiation and material blowing away from the surfaces of massive stars, plus supernova explosions.

Astronomers call NGC 6357 and other objects like it “HII” (pronounced “H-two”) regions. An HII region is created when the radiation from hot, young stars strips away the electrons from neutral hydrogen atoms in the surrounding gas to form clouds of ionized hydrogen, which is denoted scientifically as “HII.”

Researchers use Chandra to study NGC 6357 and similar objects because young stars are bright in X-rays. Also, X-rays can penetrate the shrouds of gas and dust surrounding these infant stars, allowing astronomers to see details of star birth that would be otherwise missed.


TOP IMAGE…. NGC 6357 COMPOSITE

CENTRE IMAGE…. NGC 6357 X-RAY

LOWER IMAGE…. NGC 6357 OPTICAL

BOTTOM IMAGE…. NGC 6357 INFRARED

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Homer ~ New York ~ Sunflower House ~ Historic ~ Queen Anne Architecture by Onasill ~ Bill Badzo
Via Flickr:
This home, located on the corner of North Main Street and Clinton Street, is a fine example of the Queen Anne style of architecture. It was built in 1881 for the William Kellogg family, and was designed by Archimedes Russell, a well-known architect from Syracuse. His fondness for the sunflower symbol, typical of the 1880′s, is prominently featured on the gables of the house, the side entry door, the main staircase, and even the weathervane. Many original features still exist, including beautiful stained glass windows, parquet floors, fantastic woodwork, five working fireplaces, and two indoor “inhouses” (as opposed to “outhouses”)On the corner of Main and Clinton is perhaps what is Homer’s most famous Victorian, designed by Archimedes Russell, a well-known architect from Syracuse.

Recognize that the very molecules that make up your body, the atoms that construct the molecules, are traceable to the crucibles that were once the centers of high mass stars that exploded their chemically rich guts into the galaxy, enriching pristine gas clouds with the chemistry of life. So that we are all connected to each other biologically, to the earth chemically, and to the rest of the universe atomically. That’s kinda cool! That makes me smile and I actually feel quite large at the end of that. It’s not that we are better than the universe, we are part of the universe. We are in the universe and the universe is in us.
—  Neil deGrasse Tyson

Messier 78 in Orion

Messier 78 is a spectacular reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. It is located just to the north east of Orion’s Belt at a distance of about 1500 light years. The area comprises the nebulae NGC 2064, NGC 2067, NGC 2068 and NGC 2071.

In the centre of Messier 78 lies two bright stars, HD 38563A and HD 38563B, which cause the illumination of the area’s dense clouds of gas and dust. The nebula is mostly blue due to the reflection and scattering of light from the young bright stars, but this light is reddened significantly in places where complex patches of thick dust clouds obscure the scene.
Throughout the image several Herbig-Haro objects can also be seen, especially towards the upper left. These are small reddish irregular patches of nebulosity caused by jets shooting out from newborn young stars within the clouds.

Credit: Rolf Olsen

“Recognize that the very molecules that make up your body, the atoms that construct the molecules, are traceable to the crucibles that were once the centers of high mass stars that exploded their chemically rich guts into the galaxy, enriching pristine gas clouds with the chemistry of life. So that we are all connected to each other biologically, to the earth chemically and to the rest of the universe atomically. That’s kinda cool! That makes me smile and I actually feel quite large at the end of that. It’s not that we are better than the universe, we are part of the universe. We are in the universe and the universe is in us.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson

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Monstrous cosmic gas cloud set to ignite the Milky Way

“The gravitational interactions are particularly interesting, because whenever you have three bodies interacting, two often become more tightly bound while the third gets a “kick,” potentially ejecting it. This is how we use planets to assist spacecrafts in their journey towards the outer Solar System, and the same principle can allow gas clouds to be ejected from our own galaxy. In one very particular, peculiar case, however, a gas cloud in our own galaxy almost got kicked out, but not quite.”

Give a planet a kick, and it goes into a more distant orbit around our star. Give it a hard enough kick, and it will reach escape velocity, leaving our Solar System forever. But if you gave it an almost hard enough kick, it would travel extremely far from the Sun, but it would eventually boomerang back towards the inner Solar System, with potentially disastrous, disruptive consequences. This applies to any system (not just the Solar System), including our own galaxy. In the Milky Way’s outskirts, there are high-velocity gas clouds, including one — the Smith Cloud — that’s moving towards us at a breakneck pace. Thanks to data from the Hubble Space Telescope, Andrew Fox and his team have just uncovered that this cloud came from our Milky Way, was almost ejected into intergalactic space, but is now on its way back, where in 30 million years it will collide with our galactic disk. The 11,000 light year-long cloud is expected to produce over 2 million new stars when it does.