garden spell

Darkness Hex

Do not use this spell unless your intention is to cause complete havoc. There is no reversing the spell, so make sure that this is a last resort, and you will not regret doing it later.

When you begin this spell, think about all the pain and suffering this person has caused you (or someone close to you). Visualize chaos attacking them from all sides.


MATERIALS AND PROCEDURE:

  • You will need a 9″ piece of black yarn.


Tie 3 separate knots as you chant the following:

“With this knot I seal this hex
you will not sleep, you will
not eat,
you will not rest
dark knots of anger, dark
knots of hate
This black cord with knots
brings you your fate
As I tie this second knot this
makes two
As complete black darkness
falls over you
Slander, chaos, evil too
I send the darkness straight
onto you
With this third knot, yes I bind
Complete horror and chaos
into your mind
Hex of anger, hex of hate
Bring (SPEAK THE PERSON’S NAME) down,
I will not wait.
I have spoken it and
so it shall be.
I have spoken it and
so mote it be!”

Douglas Hensley, A Book Of Magic Spells And Hexes

Some things you can keep track of as a witch:

🌙 Your moon cycle (also known as your period). If you’re into the self-love side of witchcraft and want to focus more on your body and it’s wants and needs, you might want to think about keeping track of your period. You can then create spells, rituals and meditations that correspond with the moon phase and day(s) that you’re menstruating. <— this is obviously for those that are menstruating.

🌻 Your garden. If you have a garden (even if it’s just 3 little baby herb plants in your window, hey a garden is a garden) keep track of how well your plants or herbs are doing. Write down when you water them, how much sunlight (and moonlight, if that’s your thing) they got. You could even write down any emotional vibes you’re getting from your garden. 

🔮 Your spells and rituals. Keeping track of your spells doesn’t just help you remember when you did what spell and what it was for, but it also allows you to go back and write in how well that spell worked out for you. And if it worked out well, because you kept track of it, you’ll know how to use it again in the future.

💰 Witchy buys. This is important if, like me, you tend to do a little bit of overspending on all the witchy supplies. But since I started to keep track of what I’m buying, using and not using, I’ve saved a ton of money on unnecessary things.

🙏 Gratitude. Keep a growing list of all the things you’re grateful for. It’s great to look back on in the future and it helps you keep perspective of your own life and spiritual journey.

🍵 Your tea. Okay, this is just something I do but I love to keep track of all the different teas I try. I think tea is considered a very witchy drink and therefore some of us are a little more serious about our tea drinking lol. But I just love taping in the little packaging, that my tea came in, into my journal and writing a little bit about it and how it made me feel and what it made me think about.

🌦️ The weather. This is important, to me, because I believe the weather can affect us and how we feel, think and behave. I like to have a record of what the weather was like when I casted a spell, did a ritual or did a reading so I can go back later and see if I feel that might have affected the outcomes.

i just want to be a small woodland creature who sits on top of mushrooms ‘n goes cloud watching on my days off from tending to the vegetable garden, baking bread, reading spell books, and collecting small round rocks

4

~*~
“Letting Go” Jar

Something to put your guilts, fears and hiccups into. Draws away their power, cleanses them, and protects you. Very soothing.

- empty jar
- epsom salt
- turquoise stones (could use black stones too)
- lavender oil
- problems written on scraps of paper
– put the lid on tightly and shake –

Most spells like this say to bury the jar or hide it in your closet - but that’s the opposite of what you want to do with your problems. It’s sealed, put it on your shelf if you want and add to it/shake it whenever. Looking at it should remind you you’re so much bigger than those problems; you’ve let go of them.

Dear baby witches

You do not have to be wiccan to practice witchcraft. You do not have to be religious at all to practice witchcraft. Witchcraft is just that: a craft, a practice.

Witchcraft can be anything YOU want it to be! It can be complex spells and curses or something as simple as wind chimes in your window and spices in the your cabinet.

Do not let anyone tell you what you can and cannot do with your practice. No one single person can dictate how we practice.

If you want to curse, then curse. If you don’t, then don’t! If you want to work with stones, plants, animals, fire, or even technology then go for it! There is no reason why you can’t!

Unusual Herbs

Recently, as I was reading through several books, I came across quite a few ingredients that I had either never heard of or was unsure of their exact nature. While the herbs compiled below are not necessarily “unusual,” they are ones of which I did not have extensive knowledge. Hopefully this list can be of help to anyone new to the craft, if not at least interesting reference material. 

Asafoetida:
Also known as “devil’s dung” due to its foul smell, asafoetida is a type of resin derived from a perennial herb native to Iran and Afghanistan. Today, it is mainly used as a powdered seasoning in India, as it tastes like garlic or onions when heated. Its magical powers include exorcism, purification, and protection. Careful when storing, as the odour may contaminate nearby herbs. 

Bistort:
Also referred to as “snake weed,” bistort is a flowering plant native to Europe, as well as North and West Asia. Its long flowers are different shades of pink. The American bistort (or smokeweed) has white to pinkish blooms. This plant’s magical uses include psychic powers and fertility. When combined with frankincense, you can improve physic powers, aid in divination, or drive out poltergeists.

Calamus:
May be called “sweet flag,” “sweet rush,” “sweet cane,” “sweet grass,” “sweet root,” or “sweet sedge.” A type of wetland plant, its magical uses include luck, healing, money, and protection. The powdered root can be used in healing incenses and sachets. Use caution, this plant may be carcinogenic.

Cinquefoil:
Of the two species listed in Cunningham’s Encyclopaedia of Magical Herbs, one is native to the eastern parts of US and Canada, while another is native to Eurasia and Northern Africa. Cinquefoil has blooms that can be white or yellow and leaves looking similar to those on strawberry plants. Its magical uses include money, protection, prophetic dreams, and sleep. 

Deerstongue:
Sometimes called “wild vanilla” because the leaves, when crushed or dried, produce the scent of vanilla. The leaves can be used to flavour tobacco. Native to North America, this herb grows pretty purple florets, and it is this attribute which leads some to call it by another name, “blazing star.” Its magical uses are lust and psychic powers. 

Galangal: 
Lesser galangal (Alpinia officinarum) is native to China, while greater galangal (Alpinia galanga) is native to South Asia and Indonesia. May be referred to as “chewing John” or “Low John the Conqueror,” this herb is a member of the ginger family. Its magical uses include protection, lust, health, money, psychic powers, and hex-breaking. If galangal is not available, ginger may be substituted. 

Grains of Paradise:
This peppery-like spice is native to West Africa and, along with galangal, belongs to the ginger family. Its powers include lust, luck, love, money, and wishes. While holding some grains of paradise in your hands, make a wish, and then throw a little of the herb to each direction, beginning in the north and ending in the west. 

Heliotrope:
Careful, this plant is poisonous! The flowers of “cherry pie” or “turnsole” can be white or purple and have the fragrance of vanilla. Garden heliotrope originates from Peru, while common heliotrope is native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia. This herb can be used for exorcism, prophetic dreams, healing, wealth, and invisibility. 

Niaouli:
Most commonly used as an essential oil, niaouli is a type of tree covered in papery bark from the genus melaleuca, of “tea tree” fame. Niaouli oil is made from the leaves and twigs of the tree. Though native to Papua New Guinea, New Caledonia, and parts of Australia, it is considered a weed in the United States. Appropriate for use in a “protective” oil blend. 

Petitgrain:
Another essential oil, petitgrain is made from the leaves and twigs of the bitter orange tree, thus giving it a woodsy, citrus scent. This would also work well in a “protective” oil blend. 

Stephanotis:
A flowering plant with waxy, white blooms and leathery leaves, the particular species “Madagascar jasmine” is popular in wedding bouquets. Its essential oil has the magical property of friendship. 

Tansy:
Sometimes referred to as “golden buttons” because of the appearance of its flowers. It is native to Eurasia but invasive in some parts of North America and is toxic if ingested. Tansy can be planted to repel ants, and magically, it has the powers of health and longevity. 

Ti:
This plant is native to southeastern Asia, Papua New Guinea, Melanesia, northeastern Australia, and parts of Polynesia, but was introduced to Hawaii by Polynesian settlers and greatly utilised there. “Ki” in Hawaiian, this plant is also referred to as “good luck plant.” Its associated deities include Kāne, Lono, and Pele. Magically, ti is used for protection and healing. Green ti planted around the house creates a protective barrier. 

Tuberose:
A richly scented, night-blooming white flower native to Mexico. Tuberose absolute is true tuberose essential oil, while others are synthesised for the scent. If the fragrance bouquet is all you need, you can create this with the oils of ylang-ylang, rose, jasmine, and a hint of neroli. Magically used in love-attracting mixtures. 

Woodruff:
Strongly scented, herbaceous plant sometimes referred to as “sweet woodruff,” “master of the woods,” or “wild baby’s breath.” Commercially, dried woodruff is used as pot-pourri or moth deterrent, but magically, it is used for victory, protection, and money. 

This spell will help your garden grow strong, and your harvest will nourish and protect those who eat from it. I worked in a bit to help your garden supplement your income if you plan on selling any of your produce. The rest is under the cut to keep from taking up half your dash🌱

Keep reading

🐸Lunefrog’s (very long) Masterpost🌙

There are so many witchcraft posts on my blog and this is nowhere near all of them but have these please it is 2am i hope this helps

Witch tips

🌙 How to remove an unwanted guest
🐸 Witch pen
🌙 Things I’ve learned
🐸 Grimoire prompts
🌙 Getting started with spirit work
🐸 Reconnecting with your witchy practice
🌙 On cursing
🐸 Your first garden
🌙 When writing a spell
🐸 To be a local witch
🌙 How to stop using your own energy in spells
🐸 Disposing of spell materials
🌙 The “me” candle
🐸 Painting
🌙 Subtle magic
🐸 Nail polish bottles

Getting nasty

🐸 Tips for hexing and cursing
🌙 Huge list of curses
🐸 Honesty chant
🌙 List of casual curses
🐸 Burst your bubble
🌙 Gravity 
🐸 Voice theft
🌙 Punch a nazi
🐸 Series of unfortunate events
🌙 What to do after a big curse

Men and monsters

🐸 Faeries
🌙 Yard contracts
🐸 Another post about faeries
🌙 Birds in magic
🐸 Church grim
🌙 A very large post containing good info about myths
🐸 German folklore snippet

Protection

🐸 Top ward mistakes II
🌙 Protection ring enchantment
🐸 Ward fillers
🌙 Protection charm locket
🐸 Astral eyes sigil
🌙 The furby protection spell (that frightens me greatly)
🐸 Top ward mistakes I
🌙 Banishing herbs masterpost

Plants!

🐸 Gutter gardens
🌙 Rebellious botany 
🐸 What is an electuary?
🌙 Study tips for herbalists
🐸 Witchy garden tips
🌙 Herbs in witchcraft
🐸 Even more herbs
🌙 Spell to encourage plant growth
🐸 What’s wrong with your plants?
🌙 My plants are protected spell
🐸 Rose hip tip
🌙 Ten mistakes new herb gardeners make and how to avoid them
🐸 Living fences
🌙 Save the bees!
🐸 Bee chant
🌙 The etiquette of herb gathering
🐸 Drying roses
🌙 Plant bulb circle
🐸 Witchcraft psa!
🌙 Plant growth spell
🐸 Books don’t cover everything
🌙 Indoor plants
🐸 Plants for zodiacs

Space!

🐸 Radicool moon magic graphic
🌙 Are you over complicating astral travel?
🐸 Zodiac moon witchcraft

Looking good and feeling better

🐸 Nami’s list of glamours
🌙 Siren’s lipstick spell
🐸 Nail polish glamours
🌙 Homemade rose water
🐸 Beauty magic
🌙 Self love masterpost
🐸 Rose bath spell
🌙 Valentine’s day spells
🐸 Jar for attracting romance
🌙 Amortentia tea

The Domestic Garden Witch: Living in the Gutter

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

Get Your Head Out of the Gutter! Now Get Dirty!

Growing up, my family had always been about thinking creatively when it comes to home improvement. After all, my mom’s family used to flip houses, and my dad’s family encourages frugality. After a while, certain projects just happen to crop up where you least expect it.

So it should come as no surprise that eventually it came time to change the rain gutters. By the time Dad was finished, we still had a few extra feet of unused gutter, so Mom decided to put it to good use. I still wish I had taken pictures of her gutter garden! Regardless, it’s a simple project, and if you’re an engineering student, you can easily adapt this same project for PVC or other materials that are used for your university projects!

The concept is fairly easy. Cap off the ends of the gutters, drill drainage holes, lay down a layer of gravel to encourage drainage, add soil, and add plants. Voila! Your very own gutter garden! It’s also a cost effective project, as gutters aren’t overly expensive and can often be picked up or repurposed from other home improvement projects. But the nifty thing here is what these gardens can be used for.

In the home, they can be hung up on the walls for decoration, or they can be hung up in the kitchen to provide an easy-access herb garden. If hung closer to the ground, catnip can be planted for your feline’s drug-induced pleasure. The possibilities are near-endless!

Because rain gutters are designed to run along roof edges, they can be set up in ways where they curve or turn at an angle. Consider ways in which you can wrap the garden around corners or along walls to create a visually stimulating indoor garden!

How Can I Witch This?

As usual with container gardens, think of ways in which you can bring some magic to the container. Correspond your color with intent, or decorate with sigils, symbols, and crystals! In the gravel layer, add a crystal or two to promote growth, health, and prosperity. Select plants that correspond to your intentions, and place the planters strategically in the home.

Rain gutters are particularly useful for a bit of magic, too! How? Well, consider their purpose. The movement of water around the home to avoid stagnation, and the draining away of excess. Use your rain gutter garden to encourage energy movement in the home, draining away negative energy and encouraging a fresh flow of positive intention!

May Your Harvests Always Be Bountiful! )O(

“This plant is thriving and healthy”

This turned out so awesome. To be written on the pot the plant is kept in, drawn on paper and burnt for the ashes to be mixed in the soil, or to let sit in water and charge it and then used to water the plant. If you feel another method would be more beneficial, feel free to use it instead :)

*I am currently NOT taking any sigil requests, please do not send me any asks requesting a new sigil, thank you!*

Hey tumblr so I need your help! My school always had one of those “Read Across America” maps with young adult novels or romances or whatever (evidently, I’m American) but I’ve never seen anything comparable for wlw. I’ve tried to rely on my memory and on other people’s recs but I’m only (exactly) halfway through. Any suggestions to fill in these missing states? I’ve tried to avoid stories that take place across multiple locations. Or offer more options for the ones I already have, the more the merrier.

Alabama : Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flag

Alaska :

Arizona : The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver

Arkansas :

California : Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour, Honey Girl by Lisa Freeman, Frog Music by Emma Donoghue, The Necessary Hunger by Nina Revovyr, Under the Lights by Dahlia Adler, The Butch and the Beautiful by Kris Ripper, As La Vista Turns by Kris Ripper, Far From Home by Lorelie Brown, Take Me Home by Lorelie Brown,

Colorado : Marionette by T.B. Markinson, Sleight of Hand by Mark Henwick

Connecticut : Pages for You by Sylvia Brownrigg, Patience & Sarah by Isabel Miller

Delaware :

Florida : Breathing Underwater by Lu Vickers, Roller Girl by Vanessa North

Georgia : Georgia Peaches and Other Forbidden Fruit by Jaye Robin Brown, The Color Purple by Alice Walker, The Blue Place by Nicola Griffith

Hawaii : Razor Wire by Lauren Gallagher

Idaho : Ship It by Britta Lundin, Her Hometown Girl by Lorelie Brown

Illinois : Coffee Will Make You Black by April Sinclair

Indiana : Tessa Masterson Will Go to Prom by Emily Franklin and Brendan Halpin

Iowa : A Thousand Acres by Jane Smiley, Moo by Jane Smiley

Kansas : Far From Xanadu by Julie Anne Peters

Kentucky : Run by Kody Keplinger

Louisiana : Her Name in the Sky by Kelly Quindlen

Maine : Style by Chelsea Cameron

Maryland : Every Day by David Levithan

Massachusetts : Mermaid in Chelsea Creek by Michelle Tea, Map of Ireland by Stephanie Grant

Michigan : The Liberators of Willow Run by Marianne K. Martin, The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides

Minnesota : Sister Mischief by Laura Goode, My Year Zero by Rachel Gold, Bend by Nancy Hedin

Mississippi : Ramona Blue by Julie Murphy

Missouri : Deliver Us from Evie by M.E. Kerr

Montana : The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Nebraska : Not Otherwise Specified by Hannah Moskowitz, Over You by Amy Reed

Nevada : Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

New Hampshire : 

New Jersey : The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

New Mexico : Beauty of the Broken by Tawni Waters

New York : Labyrinth Lost by Zoraida Córdova, Annie On My Mind by Nancy Garden, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde, Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown, We Are Okay by Nina LaCour, Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg, Thaw by Elyse Springer, Heat Wave by Elyse Springer

North Carolina :

North Dakota : The Murdered Family by Vernon Keel

Ohio : Fat Angie by E.E. Charlton-Trujillo

Oklahoma : Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Oregon : Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera, Forgive Me If I’ve Told You This Before by Karelia Stetz-Waters

Pennsylvania : Fun Home by Alison Bechdel, Rubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Rhode Island : The Red Tree by Caitlín R. Kiernan

South Carolina :

South Dakota :

Tennessee : Secret City by Julia Watts, If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo 

Texas : Forgetting the Alamo, Or, Blood Memory by Emma Pérez, Santa Olivia by Jacqueline Carey

Utah : Saving Alex by Alex Cooper

Vermont :

Virginia : As I Descended by Robin Talley, Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley, Jericho by Ann McMan

Washington : The Edge of Nowhere by Elizabeth George, Dreadnought by April Daniels, About A Girl by Sarah McCarry, Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear, Stuck Landing by Lauren Gallagher

West Virginia :

Wisconsin :

Wyoming :

Tips for Beginner Green Witches

Sometimes you just don’t know where to start! I hope that this post will help some beginner green witches 💚


Beginner-Friendly Plants :

  • Dandelions - Good friends! They are plentiful and they help the environment so much. Often mistaken for weeds! They can be used in wish spells or divination
  • Marigolds - Very, very easy to grow. Repels all kinds of pests, wonderful to have a hedge of in your garden! Good in spells concerning legal matters and protection.
  • Spider plants - Kind, air-purifying friends that happily grow anywhere. They produce so many pups, you’ll really only need to buy one! Good for spells concerning warding, banishing, and cleansing (of oneself or a room)
  • Succulents (esp Echeveria and Sempervivum) - They need little more than a sunny window and periodic watering, and they are so nice to have around! Good for spells concerning the home and protection (of said home, or loved ones)
  • Tomatoes - If you’re starting a garden, it’s pretty hard to screw up tomatoes (it’s okay if you do, tho, I did too.) You get delicious fruit and once they’re done, they can be plowed back into the soil for nutrients. Good for spells involving love and fertility (more than just making children!)
  • Lettuce - Easy to propagate from storebought produce (though it’s better to start from a seed) and it’s delicious! (Spray it with garlic water to keep pests off, surround with marigold hedge.) Good for spells involving wealth and self love

Advice :

  • Remember to water your plants! This is something even I forget to do, so it’s important building healthy habits
  • Don’t use pesticide/herbicide! They’re super, super awful for the environment. There are tons of natural alternatives
  • I can personally vouch for the Epsom salts, vinegar, and dish soap herbicide recipe!
  • These aren’t the only plants you’re limited to, I encourage you to branch out
  • Look into companion planting, your babes will help protect each other. There are lots of great charts
  • Astrology has lots of guides for when to plant your babes, if you’re into that (I am)
  • Talking and singing to your plants does in fact help them grow. Even if you’re bad at it, or don’t know what to say. They enjoy listening
  • Green thumbs, red palms
  • No one is born with a green thumb. I have killed my fair share of plants, I have stumbled and fallen in my craft. But I’ve been at it for a while! You’ll get there, I promise
  • Have no mercy when pulling weeds or killing pests in your garden
  • If your plants die even when you’re doing everything right, they have taken a curse or ill will in your place
  • Prune your plants (especially your house plants) often. They help to get bad vibes from your home, so it gets stored in the dead bits
  • Don’t ever plant mint in the ground. It’ll take over your garden, your yard, your life. It becomes a hellish nuisance you can’t get rid of. Just, don’t. Please.
Domestic Garden Witch: Orange You Glad You Saved That Peel?

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

I’ve Got a Peeling!

If you’re not the kind of witch I am (the kind that looks at a citrus peel and sees zest to be added to food), and you tend to juice fruits or occasionally cut open a lime for tequila, then chances are you frequently compost or toss the leftover rinds. This is an alternative to that, which is particularly useful for starting up your own herb garden.

Cut the ends off of your fruit (it can be any kind of thick-rind citrus, such as orange, grapefruit, lemon, or lime) in such a way as to flatten the ends without cutting into the flesh. Then cut the fruit in half and remove the flesh for juicing, eating, et cetera. If you then cut a small hole in the flattened end for drainage, you can proceed to fill the makeshift pot with soil, add a seed, and water.

Allow the seedling to grow until it is time to transplant. Then simply plant the whole thing in a garden. The rind will decompose, fertilizing your plant (an excellent source of nitrogen and additional nutrients) and avoiding waste.

How Can I Witch This?

The possibilities here are similar to many container gardens, but there’s a little extra fun that you can have with citrus rinds. Unlike terra cotta or ceramic, citrus peels can be carved. Adding runes and symbols are made easier because of this and if you carve them into the fruit and allow the fruit to heal a bit before using it, you can add additional time and intent to it.

Depending  upon the intent, you may also want to coordinate the type of fruit with the type of spell. For instance, orange peels can promote happiness, healing, and can add a solar association to the garden.

In Conclusion…

Though a simple project, it has a lot of potential in magic and also has a lot of potential in saving money and resources for the student witch. It saves space (something that is also helpful for the student witch), and is a green alternative to other seed starters. Because it is rich in nutrients, it also makes an ideal fertilizer when transplanted.

When getting your garden started, try enhancing your plants’ health and yield by planting the seeds in enchanted citrus peels!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

Fairy Garden Spell

Spell-a-Day: Day 22

Originally posted by olivrodassombras

Description: I had a dream where I walked through a fairy garden at dawn and it was one of the most beautiful dreams of my life. I floated about this sparsely lit, slightly misty world.


Materials:

  1. Flower petals
  2. Honey
  3. Jasmine tea
  4. Rose water

Notes:

  1. The petals best used in this spell are roses, daffodils, jasmine, butterfly bush, and primroses. You can use others, especially if you particularly love a certain flower.
  2. You should use sheets that can get dirty.

Instructions:

  1. Brew the jasmine tea.
  2. Spread the flower petals all over your bed under the covers, but above the fitted sheet.
  3. Preform any pre-spell rituals.
  4. Set the honey and rose water on an altar or nearby your bed. Leave a window open for them.
    1. What worth are feet in the fairy garden,
    2. for on those grounds no mortal has stridden.
    3. Pull one foot up, then the second,
    4. then float across bridges, by ponds,
    5. turning corner and matching pace
    6. with a feeling of eternal grace.
    7. Return me to your dazzling maze
    8. where mist blurs your perfection
    9. from my mortal gaze.
    10. This place, which for me is but a wayward recollection,
    11. calls forth from my dreams,
    12. when soul breaks free from body’s regimes
    13. and falls upwards into peaceful travel
    14. above the thistles, and sludge, and gravel.
  5. Sip your tea until you fall asleep.