gard work

LEE JONG SUK = GENIUS/TALENTED ACTOR


Thank you for all the love on the previous one I had posted!! <3

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Tips on Surviving (And Making the Most) of Your 1st Internship

As someone who just finished their first internship in a PsyD program, I feel as though I have some tips I can pass along to other people. I interned in a psychiatric hospital, working on the Partial Hospital unit with adults who suffer with major mental illness. Prior to this, I never had any clinical experience so I had a lot of anxiety but I managed to make it through! So to all my workaholics and study warriors out there: here are my internship tips for you: 

1) Plan Ahead: 

Here’s your opportunity to do some research on where you’ll be placed and get a better idea of what you’ll be doing and the environment you’ll be in. You can also use the time leading up to your start date to get your schedule situation, figure out your transportation and commuting times, and get the contact information of the important people you’ll be interning for/with. 

2) What to bring in general. This will vary depending on the type of internship you have, but here are the things I typically found myself bringing:

  • notebook
  • planner 
  • pen/pencils/highlighters
  • gum 
  • food: lunch, snacks, and drinks (usually water and coffee) 
  • travel sized deodorant, body spray, hairbrush 
  • headphones 
  • laptop (I used it for some things I did with my clients) 

3) 1st Day Guide

  • It’s better to overdress than underdress on your first day. You’ll most likely have a better idea of the wardrobe prior to the first day, but word of thumb is to err on the side of caution. An interviewer once told me that I was the best dressed interviewee she had and that made a huge impression. So dress dapper, my darlings! 
  • Arrive early. I mostly do this because I get nervous driving to new places but it’s a good idea in general. Punctuality is very important in the professional world but you can also use the extra time to prepare, give yourself a pep talk, and get yourself excited for the new experience. 
  • Ignore your phone. Unless you use it for your work, you shouldn’t have it out. It comes off as unprofessional and people tend to see you as distracted and unenthused, especially with the negative attitudes towards younger generations and technology. 
  • Meet and introduce yourself to as many people as you can. You will prioritize and learn who the important ones are but its still good to know have some connections and make people remember who you are; you never know when it will come in handy. 
  • Ask questions. There really is no such thing as a stupid question. An internship is a stepping stone to a job and a career. It is not only your right, but your responsibility to obtain as much information as possible. Not only does asking questions show that your are enthused, committed, and present, but being inquisitive early on is sure to lower the likelihood of making mistakes in the future. But remember, mistakes are inevitable and we often end up learning the most from them. 
  • Plan to stay later than expected. I’m not saying this to scare you into thinking you’ll be a slave to your internship, but you shouldn’t scurry out as soon as that clock hits 5pm. Get a lay of the land, solidify your schedule, and use your time wisely. 

4) Tips for making the most of your experience 

  • Get into the rhythm. Don’t expect to be flying solo by day 2. It’s good to be proactive and initiate, but you also want to make sure you’re checking in with yourself and making sure you’re going at the pace that will give you what you need. At some point, you should be taking risks but no one expects you to jump headfirst off the cliff without a chute right out of the gate. 
  • Keep track of any assignments, projects, tasks, etc. Planning when you can get your work done will be incredibly helpful and important, especially if you have an internship that is very busy and time demanding. 
  • Inject yourself into the environment. If there are meetings you would like to attend, ask. If there’s a project you want to be a part of, advocate for yourself to be on it. I ended up taking a CE webinar with one of my supervisors and sat in on community therapeutic meetings each morning. My attendance was not expected and most of the staff don’t enjoy going to them, but by the end of the year i was leading the meeting and it helped not only my clinical skills but my confidence as well. So, put yourself out there and show that you came to do more than just the bare minimum. 
  • Take advantage of having supervisors. They’re professionals who have experience and you’re getting free advice, guidance, and consultation. You may not always have this opportunity in the future so you should utilize it while you can. I talked with my supervisors about a plethora of things from tips on starting an individual therapy session, writing up a psychosocial assessment, boundary issues with clients, to sometimes just talking about life. 
  • Take a few minutes to yourself each day if you can. Internships can be overwhelming and taxing, especially if you’re not getting paid for them. Even if you step outside for a few minutes, go for a walk, run out to get some coffee, or have a relaxed conversation with another intern or coworker. 
  • Keep your future and goals in mind. Even if this internship isn’t your dream job or its entirely dreadful, everything can be a learning experience. Find a way to make it relevant and interesting to you, if possible. 
  • Don’t slack off on your professionalism. Even if you have a relaxed relationship or environment at your internship, remember that you’re not officially employed and are still making your way into the field. There’s no problem with joking around and having a jovial relationship with your colleagues but don’t forget that you are there to work and make an impression. 
  • Similar to asking questions to ease concerns or gain clarification, request feedback. You’re at an internship to learn the tricks of the trade and add some tools to your professional toolbox. It shows commitment and the desire for improvement. (just try not to go too overboard and come off as a tad overwhelming). 
  • Say “Thank you.” You can/should do this throughout you internship, but its very important to do so as your internship is coming to a close and at the very end. Your supervisors and colleagues put in time and effort to help you in you next step towards a career. So that being said, show your appreciation. Have a heartfelt goodbye, write your supervisor a letter, get them a card and gift card, send a final email. Whatever is appropriate for you and your site, do it. Gratitude and connections go a long way! 

Be excited! Be enthusiastic! But your heart and soul into it! And be gentle with yourself. You’re always a beginner at some point. 

I hope this helps you all and good luck! 

The old legend that Russian culture withered under communism, that artists were crippled by censorship and an oppressive “Socialist realism” aesthetic, is in part accurate. But the full truth is complicated. After artistic restrictions were somewhat loosened in the 1950s, at least one medium–animation–was propelled into a renaissance. From the ‘60s until the Soviet Union’s collapse, Russian workshops Soyuzmultfilm and Studio Ekran produced a staggering number of animated films, many of them (propaganda-free) gems like Winnie-the-Pooh and Polygon. Against the odds, even very avant-garde work blossomed.

During this period, animator-director Yuri Norstein emerged as a titan of experimental animation. His winning streak began with The Battle of Kerzhenets (1971), in which his signature style–cutout drawings layered over stratified glass panes–brings traditional Russian art and myth to life. He reached maturity on the fairy tale adaptations The Fox and the Hare and The Heron and the Crane: his choppy animation bursts with unforeseen expressiveness and humor; and each character, while simple, engages. Yet, it was Hedgehog in the Fog and Tale of Tales in the mid- to late '70s that solidified Norstein as a master.

Norstein’s films–almost all co-created with his wife, illustrator Francesca Yarbusova–are whimsical, quietly beautiful and often mysterious. He seeks forcelessly to captivate viewers: in his words, “It’s like when a person does not shout, but speaks softly, so that you even have to lean in to hear him.” A prime example is the inscrutable Tale of Tales, a series of (seemingly) disjointed scenes. At its most puzzling, Norstein’s work can feel metaphorical; but its meaning, he argues, is surface-level. While Norstein still influences animators worldwide, his own output has been minimal since the '70s: he has been animating Nikolai Gogol’s “The Overcoat” for 34 years. Find several of his films after the break.

Keep reading

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Jerry Spagnoli is a leading expert of the daguerreotype, the earliest form of photography dating back to 1839. His work adapting it to the digital age has earned him a spot among a group of artists dubbed the “antiquarian avant-garde.” He has worked with Chuck Close on daguerreotype portraits and nudes, and exhibited his work around the world.

One of Spagnoli’s passions is plants, and in the summer of 2000, he met the plant conservationist, gardener and author Amy Goldman. What began as an informal project of photographing Goldman’s harvests of heirloom fruits and vegetables on her farm in New York’s Hudson Valley blossomed into a 15-year collaboration. The fruits of it now adorn the pages of Heirloom Harvest: Modern Daguerreotypes of Historic Garden Treasures, a book the two published in October featuring 175 daguerreotype images made on Goldman’s farm.

In ‘Heirloom Harvest,’ Old-School Portraits Of Vegetable Treasures

Photos: Jerry Spagnoli

sometimes i’ll mention in passing that i like going to anime expo and sometimes i’ll get that look. where they’re like “ohhh… you’re that kind of person…” but who in this day and age hasn’t watched anime most of us grew up with it, it’s not a new concept it’s very much mainstream especially if i mention it at school everyone’s fine art noses will turn up and be like “i’d rather spend my time talking about the ephemerality of the james turrell piece in claremont and psychoanalyze the multiplicity of avant garde themes in the work of john cage” like OK you do that while i shop for bald caps on ebay.

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Jerry Spagnoli is a leading expert of the daguerreotype, the earliest form of photography dating back to 1839. His work adapting it to the digital age has earned him a spot among a group of artists dubbed the “antiquarian avant-garde.” He has worked with Chuck Close on daguerreotype portraits and nudes, and exhibited his work around the world.

One of Spagnoli’s passions is plants, and in the summer of 2000, he met the plant conservationist, gardener and author Amy Goldman. What began as an informal project of photographing Goldman’s harvests of heirloom fruits and vegetables on her farm in New York’s Hudson Valley blossomed into a 15-year collaboration. The fruits of it now adorn the pages of Heirloom Harvest: Modern Daguerreotypes of Historic Garden Treasures, a book the two published in October featuring 175 daguerreotype images made on Goldman’s farm.

Check out the full story (and see more cool psychedelic vegetable daguerreotypes – now there’s a jam band name) here.

– Petra