game of thrones references are my favourite

anonymous asked:

I'm a fan of yours seriously haha! Can you please recommend me a good book to read ? I see that you quote alot of good stuff :D

Aww, thank you so much! :D

Since this is about books, I shall endeavour to make this an extra pretty post! 

(Ante scriptum.: Some of my personal recommendations are in this post (x), the rest will be below. Oh, and by the bye, the quotes on my blog are a wild mixture of books I’ve actually read, quotes that simply caught my eye and some of my own poems, texts, etc

I don’t really know what genre you’re into, so I tried to make it as widely interesting as possible. If I had to recommend just one book, though, I’d say go for “Red Rising”, unless violence doesn’t work out for you)


——————-BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS —————–

Mystery/Crime

Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None, Crooked House, The A.B.C. Murders, Murder on the Orient Express, Sad Cypress, The Pale Horse, Cat Among Pigeons, The Thirteen Problems
(ah, the Queen of Crime. If you can, just read all of her books. They’re worth it.)

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: The Sign of the Four, The Hound of the Baskervilles, Short Stories: The Five Orange Pips, The Blue Carbuncle, The Yellow Face, The Musgrave Ritual, The Crooked Man, The Greek Interpreter, The Final Problem, The Dancing Men
(no comment needed)

Dorothy L. Sayers: Gaudy Night, Murder Must Advertise, Strong Poison, Have His Carcase 
(very artistic writing style on top of intricate plots)

Raymond Chandler: The Big Sleep, Farewell, my Lovely
(all the hardboiled, all the grimness, all the melancholy)

Edgar Allan Poe: The Fall of the House of Usher, The Murders in the Rue Morgue
(mysterious, dark and unsettling)

Fyodor Dostoyevski: Crime and Punishment
(so good! Not at all dusty and boring like people keep claiming. I loved it)

Alexander McCall-Smith: The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency 
(a lady detective in Botswana. She’s awesome)

Emma Donoghue: Room
(told from the perspective of a 5 year-old, who’s spent his whole life in just one room. Want to find out why?)

(Bonus: Ohba/Obata: Death Note 
(basically a visual novel. Very intricate, psychological mindgames and an epic rivalry))

Science Fiction

Philip Kerr: A Philosophical Investigation 
(literary and philosophical references and quotes left and right and they’re actually vital to the plot)

Orson Scott Card: Ender’s Game
(How to Use Your Brain and Rise to Fame 101. Also: How to Defeat an Alien Invasion. Brilliant. My second favourite book

Pierce Brown: Red Rising, Golden Son 
(amazing, current favourite book, soon to be a film, can’t recommend it enough. Imagine Ender’s Game meets Harry Potter meets Hunger Games meets Game of Thrones) 

George Orwell: 1984 
(2+2 = 5)

Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451
(so you like reading? Read this book, then learn it by heart and burn it)

Edwin A. Abbott: Flatland
(sexism aside, this flat book is brilliant - do you want to visit two dimensions? One dimension even?)

Jules Verne: Around the World in 80 Days, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
(old-school goodness)

Douglas Adams: The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
(don’t forget your towel!)

(Bonus:  Randall Munroe What if?
(scientific answers to all the random questions you ever had))

Historical

Markus Zusak: The Book Thief 
(told from the perspective of Death, it describes the life of an unusual girl growing up in Nazi Germany)

Kurt Vonnegut: Slaughterhouse-Five
(the main character slips in and out of time as he’s trying to come to terms with his war experiences. Absurd, symbolic and ingenious. So it goes.)

Daniel Kehlmann: Measuring the World
(a beautiful, fictional retelling of the lives of two geniuses: Alexander von Humboldt, who explores the world to understand it and Carl Friedrich Gauss, who scarcely leaves his room and thinks in numbers)

Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice
(It is a truth universally acknowledged that a person in posession of a tumblr blog already knows this book) 

Joseph Conrad: The Heart of Darkness
(stylistically beautiful, with a crushing atmosphere, the main character travels into the heart of the jungle and observes the cruelties of slavery in African colonies, while trying to fulfill his own quest)

Jonas Jonasson: The 100 Year Old Man who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared
(the fictional life of a man who, for some reason or other, was involved in every single important world affair of the last 100 years and now escapes from his nursing home. Bizarre, funny and with educational value)

Julian Barnes: Flaubert’s Parrot
(the oddest biography you will ever read)

F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby
(I officially greenlight this book)

Charlotte Brontë: Jane Eyre
(independent heroine who uses her brain? Voilà!)

E. M. Forster: Maurice, A Room with a View
(1) is a refreshingly grounded coming of age story of a gay man, 2) is a proxy recommendation by a friend who’s enchanted by it)

Evelyn Waugh: Brideshead Revisited
(tragic, decadent, aesthatical, philosophical, doomed. Includes a teddy bear)

Ovid: Metamorpheses
(I translated some of these in school - they’re delightfully weird)

Homer: The Illiad/The Odyssey
(according to one of my professors the very reason we have an educational system. Long story. Anyway, pays off)

The Brothers Grimm: Folk and Fairy Tales
(witches, wolves and princesses. The full package)

(Bonus: Apostolos Doxiadis: Logicomix
(a biography of Bertrand Russel on the outside, an introduction to logic and set theory on the inside))

Literary Fiction/Philosophical

Antoine de Saint-Exupéry: The Little Prince
(magnifique)

Hermann Hesse: Narcissus and Goldmund, Steppenwolf
(1) follows the lives of two very different men (one led by thinking, the other by feeling), who grow up together, walk different paths and never forget one another, 2) is the quintessential story of the tortured soul within an artist, which is half wolf, half man and torn between its desires. Discusses suicide)

Franz Kafka: The Metamorphosis 
(one day, Gregor wakes up and is literally vermin. If that doesn’t hook you, I don’t know what will) 

Voltaire: Candide
(how does one live a good life? Very cynical satire)

Albert Einstein/Sigmund Freud: Why War?
(letters between Einstein and Freud in which they discuss why man has or doesn’t have to wage war)

Alan Bennett: The Uncommon Reader
(the Queen, yes, THE Queen, discovers the joys of reading. Delightful and teaches a lot about literature)

Margaret Atwood: A Handmaid’s Tale
(the protagonist lives in a world where most women have been reduced to breeding machines. Discover why and how she deals with it)

James Joye: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses
(1) semi-autobiographical, a young man with a curious mind grows up and gets to know himself, 2) I don’t even know, but I’m in the middle and enjoying it so far. Prepare for weirdness)

Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Grey
(what if you didn’t age, but a painting of you did? Welcome to Dorian’s crib! Lavish and beautiful)

Terry Pratchett: The Carpet People
(read this forever ago, still in love with the concept)

Michael Ende: Momo, The Neverending Story
(quintessential “children’s books” (I’m not very fond of that term), filled with imagination, empathy and philosophy)

William Golding: Lord of the Flies
(unleash a horde of young boys on an island and leave them hungry and scared. Welcome to the original Hunger Games. Disturbing, meant to show corruption of society)

E.T.A. Hoffmann: The Best Tales of Hoffmann
(basically: what did I just read? I don’t know, but I’m scared)

(Bonus 1: Alan Moore: Watchmen
(just, just do it, okay?)

Bonus 2: Isayama Hajime: Shingeki no Kyojin
(a plotting tighter than most books, with a gripping story and some really dark things to say (and graphically show) about humanity))

Non-Fiction

Karl Popper: All Life is Problem Solving
(changed the way I think, thus, changed my life. Amazing)

Edward Frenkel: Love & Math
(you’ll never love maths as much as Edward Frenkel)

John Lloyd: The Book of General Ignorance
(everything you think is wrong)

James Gleick: Chaos
(nifty science! Great introduction)

Alistair Moffat: Before Scotland
(WILL get you interested in anthropology. Would you bury your dead under your bed?)

Apt/Helfert/Wilkinson: Orbit
(gorgeous, full-spread pictures of Earth taken by astronauts)

Theatre

Oscar Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest
(spoiler: Being Earnest is very important)

Shakespeare: Hamlet, Richard II, Henry IV, Henry V
(don’t let the anyone fool you: Shakespeare’s history plays are great fun and filled with eccentric characters who majestically talk about their own self-importance. Pro-Tip: Compare with The Hollow Crown, a TV series filled with everyone on British TV. Yes, that means Tom Hiddlestone)

Sophocles: Antigone
(A literal classic)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Faust
(tl;dr: Don’t make a deal with the devil, k?)

Samuel Beckett: Waiting for Godot
(cross my heart: the weirdest and somehow most relatable play you’ll ever see. Well? Shall we go?)

Poetry

T.S. Eliot: Prufrock, The Waste Land

John Keats: Ode to a Nightingale, His Last Sonnet, Ode to Autumn

Oscar Wilde: Ave Imperatrix, Flower of Love

William Shakespeare: Sonnet 18, Sonnet 100

William Blake: The Tyger

William Wordsworth: The Daffodils

William Butler Yeats: The Second Coming


Happy reading, to all you (future) bibliophiles! :)

7

Winter is brewing: Game of Thrones inspired craft beer

Ever wondered what the Game of Thrones houses would be if they were craft beer? Well, wonder no longer! 

This is my masterpost of all the Game of Thrones inspired craft beer labels (so far?). I’m reposting because I made these way back at the beginning of my blog when I had very few followers so I thought it would be cool to share my favourite creations with you! I hope you enjoy them (and can appreciate how much time went into them) and the references for the people who watch the show!

6

Nick Fury gave me this badge. When he did, I swore an oath, we all did. To serve when everything else fails, to be humanity’s last line of defence, to be the shield.

Why I’m Not Giving Up On Jaime Yet, Goddamnit

So I would just like to start this off with two announcements: GAME OF THRONES SPOILERS UP TO 6x08 and I will only be referring to the TV show as the books and the show are so hugely different.

OK, so Jaime Lannister from GoT is one of my absolute favourite characters on the show. I love love love his character development. How he went from a thorough jerkass to actually one of the most decent, honest characters on the show.

BUT thanks to this latest episode a lot of people seem to be really disappointed in him, saying that all of his character development has gone down the drain. But I don’t think it has. Honestly I feel like it would have made NO SENSE for Jaime to go off with Brienne, at least not without some kind of justification.

At this point, we see that Jaime wants to be a good person. He hates some of the things he’s done in the past and he hates some of the things that his family has done. You can see that Jaime hates what he’s doing, taking the Tully’s from their home, but at the same time you can see that he still loves Cercei and he still loves his son. He’s there on orders from not only his King, but from his son

Yes, Jaime’s character has developed so that he’s not the same douchebag who pushed Bran from the tower in episode 1, but I don’t believe he’s changed enough that he wouldn’t do so again. He’s loved Cercei his whole life and even if she can be a bitch sometimes she’s his sister and he loves her. And on top of all that she needs him. She will never leave her son, their son, but the kid has been brainwashed into helping the people who are persecuting her. She’s all alone, with two of her children dead and she needs him.

So he’ll do what he has to do to protect her, because she’s family. He may love Brienne, in fact after this episode I have absolutely no doubt that he does in fact love Brienne, but she isn’t family. Cercei came first. He feels like he owes Cercei his loyalty.

But look at what he actually did in this episode! Brienne came to him asking to be let through and for him to let the Tully army through if needed and he agreed. Old Jaime may have agreed but there was no way he would have meant it. But this Jaime? He agreed and there is no doubt that he absolutely meant it. And allowing the Tully army to march north unscathed would have definitely pissed him family off. He loves them, but he’s no longer so under their spell that their interests are all he acts on.

And you can see that he wants to help Brienne, he wants to help the Starks take back their home and he wants the Tully’s to keep theirs. That basically what Jaime’s arc in this episode was about! His dilemma on his own personal honor vs his duty to his family. And in the end his duty won as it has nearly always won for Jaime. That is who he is! He’s the Kingslayer it’s what everyone calls him, said so many times in this episode along. His whole identity is presented as someone who will put his family above himself every time.

And he’s slowly drawing away from that. You can see that he’s getting there, but his entire life of being entirely devoted to his family is hard to shake off. But this episode has me absolutely positive that it will happen.

He’s not going to suddenly realize that Cercei is toxic for him and that he should go with Brienne. He needs a push. Something that breaks him from his family loyalty for good. I can see two things happening: Cercei being sentenced to execution and being killed, or Cercei betraying him in some huge way and then expecting him to still blindly follow her. And this episode makes me think that it’s going to happen

One thing is for sure, if/when Jaime DOES decide to leave his family, it’s going to be epic.