galaxy centaurus a

Centaurus A Extreme Deep Field

Centaurus A is the closest radio galaxy to us and is hosting an Active Galactic Nuleus (AGN) in its centre. It is believed that the twisting of magnetic fields in the accretion disk around the central supermassive black hole collimates the outflow along its rotation axis, so a resulting jet of plasma emerges from each face of the accretion disk.

Credit: Rolf Olsen

What’s happening at the center of elliptical galaxy NGC 4696? There, long tendrils of gas and dust have been imaged in great detail as shown by this recently released image from theHubble Space Telescope. These filaments appear to connect to the central region of the galaxy, a region thought occupied by asupermassive black hole. Speculation holds that this black hole pumps out energy that heats surrounding gas, pushes out cooler filaments of gas and dust, and shuts down star formation. Balanced by magnetic fields, these filaments then appear to spiral back in toward and eventually circle the central black hole. NGC 4696 is the largest galaxy in the Centaurus Cluster of Galaxies, located about 150 million light years from Earth. The featured imageshows a region about 45,000 light years across.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, A. Fabian, Hubble Space Telescope

What’s happening at the center of this awesome elliptical galaxy? Long filaments of gas and dust have been imaged in great detail as shown by this recently released image from the Hubble Space Telescope. They appear to connect to the middle of the galaxy, a region thought occupied by a supermassive black hole.

Speculation holds that this black hole pumps out energy that heats surrounding gas all while pushing out cooler filaments of gas and dust. Balanced by magnetic fields, these filaments then appear to spiral back in toward and eventually circle the center.

NGC 4696 is the largest galaxy in the Centaurus Cluster of Galaxies, located about 150 million light years from Earth. This image shows a region about 45,000 light years across.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, A. Fabian

Dusty filaments in NGC 4696h

This picture, taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows NGC 4696, the largest galaxy in the Centaurus Cluster.

The new images taken with Hubble show the dusty filaments surrounding the centre of this huge galaxy in greater detail than ever before.

These filaments loop and curl inwards in an intriguing spiral shape, swirling around the supermassive black hole at such a distance that they are dragged into and eventually consumed by the black hole itself.

Credits: NASA, ESA/Hubble, A. Fabian

Infrared, X-ray & Optical Images of Centaurus A

Centaurus A is the fifth brightest galaxy in the sky – making it an ideal target for amateur astronomers – and is famous for the dust lane across its middle and a giant jet blasting away from the supermassive black hole at its center.  Cen A is an active galaxy about 12 million light years from Earth.

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO; Optical: Rolf Olsen; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech

What’s the closest active galaxy to planet Earth? That would be Centaurus A, only 11 million light-years distant. Spanning over 60,000 light-years, the peculiar elliptical galaxy is also known as NGC 5128. Forged in a collision of two otherwise normal galaxies, Centaurus A’s fantastic jumble of young blue star clusters, pinkish star forming regions, and imposing dark dust lanes are seen here in remarkable detail. The colorful galaxy portrait is a composite of image data from space- and ground-based telescopes large and small. Near the galaxy’s center, left over cosmic debris is steadily being consumed by a central black hole with a billion times the mass of the Sun. As in other active galaxies, that process generates the radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray energy radiated by Centaurus A.

Processing & Copyright: Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari
Image Data: Hubble Space Telescope, European Southern Observatory

NGC 5128, otherwise known as Centaurus A, is a fairly large galaxy that is quite peculiar. Large galaxies usually are either elliptical or spiral; Centaurus A however, seems to be both at the same time. Radio imaging has revealed to us that under the veil of dust, it has hidden spiral arms. It is currently the only elliptical galaxy that we know of that also has spiral arms. Even better yet, it is the 5th brightest galaxy in the night sky, making it an ideal target for amateur astronomers so you can check this hidden gem out for yourself!

anonymous asked:

wormhole, supernova, pinwheel galaxy, cassiopeia, centaurus, pegasus, moon, uranus ;3

uranus : what’s your hobby
drawing !!

moon : what are you currently studying/hoping to study
architecture

centaurus : favourite holiday
halloween

cassiopeia : favourite book
aaa nothing comes to mind heck

pegasus : favourite place to be
it would be frog’s arms but he’s like another fucking galaxy away cause he’s lame

pinwheel galaxy : would you date the last person you talked to
I am dating the last person I talked to ;^)

supernova : what’s one thing you want to do before you die
meet my dumb frog @spiderlocker

wormhole : what’s something you wish would happen, but know won’t
ah jeez, I can’t really think of anything actually

liquidlightning  asked:

I wanna know ur answers to all of them lol but lets just go with moon, neptune, centaurus, cigar galaxy :)

Moon: What are you currently studying/hope to study?
Idek tbh I have a lot of Interests

Neptune: When’s your birthday?
May 28th

Centaurus: Favourite holiday?
Halloween

Cigar Galaxy: How’s your flirting skills?
Oh man,, awful when intentional

(NASA)  M83: The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy
Image Credit: Subaru Telescope (NAOJ), Hubble Space Telescope,
European Southern Observatory - Processing & Copyright: Robert Gendler

Big, bright, and beautiful, spiral galaxy M83 lies a mere twelve million light-years away, near the southeastern tip of the very long constellation Hydra. Prominent spiral arms traced by dark dust lanes and blue star clusters lend this galaxy its popular name, The Southern Pinwheel. But reddish star forming regions that dot the sweeping arms highlighted in this sparkling color composite also suggest another nickname, The Thousand-Ruby Galaxy. About 40,000 light-years across, M83 is a member of a group of galaxies that includes active galaxy Centaurus A. In fact, the core of M83 itself is bright at x-ray energies, showing a high concentration of neutron stars and black holes left from an intense burst of star formation. This sharp composite color image also features spiky foreground Milky Way stars and distant background galaxies. The image data was taken from the Subaru Telescope, the European Southern Observatory’s Wide Field Imager camera, and the Hubble Legacy Archive.