gaining goddess

Prophecy is a gift bestowed upon to Sagittarius. Prophecy is defined as “a prediction” and “the faculty, function, or practice of prophesying”. Prophesying meaning “saying that (a specificed) thing will happen in the future”. Sagittarius is ruled by Jupiter, the planet of luck, expansion and Gods/Goddesses. Sagittarius gains prophetic visions of the future by the divine Gods/Goddesses of its ruling planet. In addition, Sagittarius rules over the Ninth House which is the House of Higher Education and Religion. Prophets would be connected to Sagittarius and the Ninth House. Prophets in religious terms are defined as “an individual who has claimed to have been contacted by a divine being, specifically a god or goddess, and to speak for them, serving as an intermediary with humanity, delivering this newfound knowledge from the supernatural source to other people”. Humanity and knowledge are keywords in this definition because they are words associated with Aquarius. In esoteric astrology, Aquarius is ruled by Jupiter.

🍃🎨 Color Magick 🎨🍃

⭐ Good day, lovelies ⭐

It’s a great day for color magick! As color sweeps through full force (at least here in New York!….finally) and summer is (hopefully) here to stay!

These are a few color correlations I’ve gathered. However, just like anything else, these can be personalized to the user. Due to my synesthesia, my color magick correspondences are slightly altered. I’ll post about those later! For now, here are the common connections!

Pink: love, tenderness, romance, caring, nurturing, youth, friendship, emotional love and healing

Red: {fire} love, passion, vitality, health, physical assertion, independence, determination, masculinity

Orange: good luck, charm, good fortune, kindness, optimism, encouragement celebration, feast

Yellow: {air} trade, travel, knowledge, magick itself, vitality, change, communication, visualization

Green: {earth/water} nature, fertility, growth, rejuvenation, healing, peace, balance, home, animals

Blue: {water/air} truth, wisdom, tranquility, calmness, justice, devotion, femininity, prophecy, loyalty

Purple: elemental spirits, divination, psychic abilities, counter acts negativity, meditation, psychic power

Brown: {earth} stability, grounding, conservation, home protection, concentration, decisiveness

Black: {earth} repel/banish evil/negativity, protection, break off addictions and habits, deep meditation

White: {spirit} elemental spirits, purification, cleansing on all levels, connect to higher self, all healing

Silver: {moon} feminine energy, cycles, rebirth, emotional stability, neutralize energy, intuition, dreams

Gray: put a halt to action, neutralize negative influences

Gold: {sun} masculine energy, self confidence, perfection, luxury, overcoming bad habits, financial gain

Copper/Bronze: {love} goddesses, passion, positive friendships, successful negotiations, luck with love

so i’m reading this very interesting book on the history of women making textiles. It seems that the very first textile clothes were made over 20,000 years ago, and were string skirts meant to symbolize the fertility of the woman wearing them- in other words, they were made by women, for women, and were purely symbolic rather than functional.

Much later in the book, the author calls attention to Athena, whose chief domain is weaving. She also governs ship-building, military strategy, cleverness, and basically all human invention. The entirety of human ingenuity and technology is tied up in a goddess whose central domain is weaving. 

Even later in the book, there’s a passing reference to Eve, who, in Christian mythology, forever dooms women to an eternity spinning and weaving, when she eats the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge and realizes that she and Adam are naked.

Hmmm, so women were the first to make/see the need for clothes (textile clothes, at least), women were the first to gain knowledge, and Athena, goddess of human invention (especially weaving), is female….

Tog Theory: Goddesses, Valg, and Witches, Pt. 3

Abstract: The original Three Fae Sister-Queens, or the Triple Goddess, was in fact Mala, Mora, and Mab. They are goddesses from another realm who became trapped in Erilea during the Valg Wars. But they were not the only goddesses to become trapped. Another goddess, this one a goddess and mother of the Valg, was also trapped, and has been working ever since to wield the Wyrdkeys and bring the rest of her children to Erilea to finish what she started. This goddess is Maeve. This will be broken into several parts. 

Summary of Parts 1 and 2The three Fae Sister-Queens were Mala, Mora, and Mab, and they are the same as Mala, Anneith, and Deanna. Maeve later usurped Mala’s position. Maeve is in fact a Valg Queen, or the mother of the Valg, and she is trying to gain control of the goddesses’ power to unleash the rest of her progeny, and she has manipulated legend and myth to hide her true identity since she’s been in Erilea. Now, onto Part 3!


Keep reading

ToG Theory: Goddesses, Valg, and Witches, Pt. 4 (Final)

Abstract: The original Three Fae Sister-Queens, or the Triple Goddess, was in fact Mala, Mora, and Mab. They are goddesses from another realm who became trapped in Erilea during the Valg Wars. But they were not the only goddesses to become trapped. Another goddess, this one a goddess and mother of the Valg, was also trapped, and has been working ever since to wield the Wyrdkeys and bring the rest of her children to Erilea to finish what she started. This goddess is Maeve. This will be broken into several parts.

Summary of Parts 12 and 3:  The three Fae Sister-Queens were Mala, Mora, and Mab, and they are the same as Mala, Anneith, and Deanna. Maeve later usurped Mala’s position. Maeve is in fact a Valg Queen, or the mother of the Valg, and she is trying to gain control of the goddesses’ power to unleash the rest of her progeny, and she has manipulated legend and myth to hide her true identity since she’s been in Erilea. Erawan is Maeve’s son and also the ancestor of the Witches himself. He and Maeve are part of the larger pantheon of gods that we know about, each filling a good/neutral/evil role that was originally balanced but is currently disrupted. Now, onto the Final Part!

Keep reading

Great Goddess of Teotihuacan

Discovery and interpretation

In years leading up to 1942, a series of murals were found in the Tepantitla compound in Teotihuacan. The Tepantitla compound provided housing for what appears to have been high status citizens and its walls (as well as much of Teotihuacan) are adorned with brightly painted frescoes. The largest figures within the murals depicted complex and ornate deities or supernaturals. In 1942, archaeologist Alfonso Caso identified these central figures as a Teotihuacan equivalent of Tlaloc, the Mesoamerican god of rain and warfare. This was the consensus view for some 30 years.

In 1974, Peter Furst suggested that the murals instead showed a feminine deity, an interpretation echoed by researcher Esther Pasztory. Their analysis of the murals was based on a number of factors including the gender of accompanying figures, the green bird in the headdress, and the spiders seen above the figure. Pasztory concluded that the figures represented a vegetation and fertility goddess that was a predecessor of the much later Aztec goddess Xochiquetzal. In 1983, Karl Taube termed this goddess the “Teotihuacan Spider Woman”. The more neutral description of this deity as the “Great Goddess” has since gained currency.

The Great Goddess has since been identified at Teotihuacan locations other than Tepantitla – including the Tetitla compound (see photo below), the Palace of the Jaguars, and the Temple of Agriculture – as well as on portable art including vessels and even on the back of a pyrite mirror. The 3-metre-high blocky statue (see photo below) which formerly sat near the base of the Pyramid of Moon is thought to represent the Great Goddess, despite the absence of the bird-headdress or the fanged nosepiece.

Actual mural from the Tetitla compound showing a similar portrait.

Esther Pasztory speculates that the Great Goddess, as a distant and ambivalent mother figure, was able to provide a uniting structure for Teotihuacan that transcended divisions within the city.

This statue is generally identified as the Great Goddess, and formerly stood near the base of the Pyramid of the Moon.

After Teotihuacan

The Great Goddess is apparently peculiar to Teotihuacan, and does not appear outside the city except where Teotihuacanos settled. There is very little trace of the Great Goddess in the Valley of Mexico’s later Toltec culture, although an earth goddess image has been identified on Stela 1, from Xochicalco, a Toltec contemporary. While the Aztec goddess Chalchiuhtlicue has been identified as a successor to the Great Goddess of Teotihuacan, archaeologist Janet Catherine Berlo has suggested that at least the Goddess’ warlike aspect was assumed by the Aztec’s protector god – and war god – Huitzilopochtli. The wresting of this aspect from the Great Goddess was memorialized in the myth Huitzilopochtli, who slew his sister Coyolxauhqui shortly after his birth.

Berlo also sees echoes of the Great Goddess in the veneration of the Virgin of Guadalupe.

The Great Goddess

Two major defining characteristics of the Great Goddess are a bird headress and a nose pendant with descending fangs. In the Tepantitla and Tetitla murals, for example, the Great Goddess wears a frame headdress that includes the face of a green bird, generally identified as an owl or quetzal, and a rectangular nosepiece adorned with three circles below which hang three or five fangs. The outer fangs curl away from the center, while the middle fang points down.

Other defining characteristics include the colors red and yellow; note that the Goddess appears with a yellowish cast in both murals.

In the depiction from the Tepantitla compound, the Great Goddess appears with vegetation growing out of her head, perhaps hallucinogenic morning glory vines or the world tree. Spiders and butterflies appear on the vegetation and water drips from its branches and flows from the hands of the Great Goddess. Water also flows from her lower body. These many representations of water led Caso to declare this to be a representation of the rain god, Tlaloc.

Below this depiction, separated from it by two interwoven serpents and a talud-tablero, is a scene showing dozens of small human figures, usually wearing only a loincloth and often showing a speech scroll (see photo below). Several of these figures are swimming in the criss-crossed rivers flowing from a mountain at the bottom of the scene. Caso interpreted this scene as the afterlife realm of Tlaloc although this interpretation has also been challenged, most recently by María Teresa Uriarte, who provides a more commonplace interpretation: that “this mural represents Teotihuacan as [the] prototypical civilized city associated with the beginning of time and the calendar”.

A portion of the actual mural from the Tepantitla compound which appears under the Great Goddess portrait.

Domain

The Great Goddess is thought to have been a goddess of the underworld, darkness, the earth, water, war, and possibly even creation itself. To the ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica, the jaguar, the owl, and especially the spider were considered creatures of darkness, often found in caves and during the night. The fact that the Great Goddess is frequently depicted with all of these creatures further supports the idea of her underworld connections.

In many murals, the Great Goddess is shown with many of the scurrying arachnids in the background, on her clothing, or hanging from her arms. She is often seen with shields decorated with spider webs, further suggesting her relationship with warfare. The Great Goddess is often shown in paradisial settings, giving gifts. For example, the mural from Tepantitla shows water dripping from her hands while in the tableau under her portrait mortals swim, play ball, and dance (see photo to right). This seeming gentleness is in contrast to later similar Aztec deities such as Cihuacoatl, who frequently has a warlike aspect. This contrast, according to Esther Pasztory, an archaeologist who has long studied Teotihuacan, extends beyond the goddesses in question to the core of the Teotihuacan and Aztec cultures themselves:

“Although I cannot prove this precisely, I sense that the Aztec goal was military glory and staving off the collapse of the universe, whereas the Teotihuacan aim seems to have been the creation of paradise on earth.”

This is not to say, however, that the Great Goddess does not have her more violent aspect: one mural fragment, likely from Techinantitla, shows her as a large mouth with teeth, framed by clawed hands.

Siren Sorrento (海魔女のソレント)
Sorrento was sent to kill the injured Bronze Saints in the hospital right after the Sanctuary battles. He encountered Taurus Aldebaran, who was sent by Athena to protect them. They manage an impasse and before they begin again, Saori showed up and requested Sorrento to take her to see Julian Solo. Later he would reveal that it was like a gentle command that he could not refuse, a request from a true goddess. He gained great respect for Athena at that moment.

Sorrento was born in Austria, famous for its musical arts and home of many great musicians. Ironically it is also a landlocked country, with no coastline.

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This post is dedicated to ay-16r, our #1 Fan for April, 2014!

I would appreciate if people would not repost our special posts on instagram. Thanks.

Apreciaría si por favor no repostean nuestros posts especiales en instagram. Gracias.