gail caldwell

I know now that we never get over great losses; we absorb them, and they carve us into different, often kinder, creatures. …We tell the story to get them back, to capture the traces of footfalls through the snow.
— 

Gail Caldwell, Let’s Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship

I know now that we never get over great losses; we absorb them, and they carve us into different, often kinder, creatures. …We tell the story to get them back, to capture the traces of footfalls through the snow.
—  Gail Caldwell, Let’s Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship
It’s taken years for me to understand that dying doesn’t end the story; it transforms it. Edits, rewrites, the blur of epiphany of one-way dialogue. Most of us wander in and out of one another’s lives until not death, but distance, does us part– time and space and the heart’s weariness are the blander executioners of human connection.
—  Gail Caldwell, Let’s Take The Long Way Home
I know now that we never get over great losses; we absorb them, and they carve us into different, often kinder, creatures. …We tell the story to get them back, to capture the traces of footfalls through the snow.
—  Gail Caldwell, Let’s Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship
It’s taken for me years to understand that dying doesn’t end the story; it transforms it. Edits, rewrites, the blur and epiphany of one-way dialogue. Most of us wander in and out of one another’s lives until not death, but distance, does us part–time and space and the heart’s weariness are the blander executioners of human connection.
—  Let’s take the long way home by Gail Caldwell, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
From the first winter afternoon in the Harvard ball fields, “Oh no–I need you” had become an admission and a clarion call–the tenet of dependency that forms the weft of friendship. We needed each other so that we could count the endless days of forests and flat water, but the real need was soldered by the sadder, harder moments–discord or helplessness or fear–that we dared to expose to each other. It took me years to grasp that this grit and discomfort in any relationship are an indicator of closeness, not its opposite.
—  Let’s Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship by Gail Caldwell