g2geny

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The top 30 young people in digital media: Nos 30-11

The Guardian’s 10 trainee digital journalists invited Alex Hern and Matt Andrews from the Guardian, and BuzzFeed’s editorial director Jack Shepherd to help choose the most exciting people under 30 in digital media. Here are their choices for Nos 30-11

PJ Liguori (30), Rachel Rosenfelt (25), Laurie Penny (22), Caroline O'Donovan (20), Jack Harries (19), Dylan Sprouse (18), Tanya Burr (17), King Bach (16), Emily Graslie (15), Lewis Hancox (13). 

Click photos for credits and captions. 

'We can't turn our backs on a generation of young men'

By Alice Aylett Roberts

Yesterday I wrote an article on how the Guardian’s Generation Y project, which is being run by nine women and one man, seems to be comfortable reinforcing the under-representation of young men in both English at A Level and Journalism at university.

The whole thing made me a little angry. So, like many people in my generation in times of anger/hunger/happiness/boredom (delete as appropriate), I turned to Twitter.

Everything about The Guardian’s #G2GenY takeover makes me angry.

— Alice Aylett Roberts (@aliceroberts)

March 18, 2014

Within minutes of sending the first tweet I received replies from three of the Guardian’s new trainees asking for an explanation. I obliged, outlining my concerns about the gender disparity, but it appeared that they didn’t share my point of view.

@aliceroberts @fred_dash yes i see what you mean. perhaps it might start to balance out thousands of years of underrepresented women?

— Emma Howard (@EmmaEHoward)

March 18, 2014

I’m guessing society could do with several centuries of male tokenism before it become a problem rather than a solution. #G2GenY

— Fred McConnell (@fred_dash)

March 18, 2014

These replies left me a little stunned. Were Emma and Fred suggesting that it’s okay to marginalise the views of young men today as retribution for injustices of the past? Is this what Generation Y is thinking?

Male tokenism will never be a solution and what Fred may not realise, is that it is already a problem. Young men are underrepresented in all sorts of ways and they are losing out to young women all the time.

Girls are still outperforming boys at nearly every level of education, receiving the greater percentage of the top grades in Key Stage Sats, GCSEs and A Levels, and nobody really knows why. But, perhaps the most worrying statistic of all is the rate of suicide for young men.

The latest ONS figures show that men are now three times more likely to commit suicide than women. Whereas in the last 30 years the suicide rate for women has decreased, the rate for men has risen and is still rising. Suicide is the biggest killer of young men in England and Wales and more needs to be done to tackle this problem.

I have always identified as a feminist. I was the sort of awkward child who insisted on joining the school rugby and cricket teams, despite having no particular aptitude or enthusiasm for the sports, but because I thought it wasn’t fair that no girls were on the team. I proudly call myself a feminist because I believe in equality, and I thought that’s what feminism was about. It’s the same reason I read the Guardian, because I thought the paper shared the values I hold dear.

We can’t turn our backs on a generation of young men who are struggling in education, at work and even in their daily lives. It’s wholly wrong to punish the men of our generation for thousands of years of female subjugation, which is not their fault. If this is Generation Y feminism then I want no part in it.

What do you think? Leave a comment or send a tweet to let us know.

Alice is a social media expert and trainee journalist. You can follow her on Twitter @aliceroberts

Home and dry: young people on alternatives to buying a place

From living on a houseboat to moving back with your parents, four people on how they’ve coped with not being able to afford their own property – and one on why she regrets buying. 

Paula lives on a houseboat with her rescue dog, Rupert, a staffie cross, and remembers evenings last summer, with her hatch open, as being magical. “A swan will go past, and it’s very calm and quiet. You think of London as being so noisy, but it’s much more relaxing on the canal." Read more

Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian

We are 10 young journalists. Our skills are a little rough around the edges, but we have new perspectives to offer. We have 10 different backgrounds, have lived in 18 countries (not on gap yahs) and speak 10 languages.

Aside from student debt, what do we have in common? We are all members of Generation Y

— 

Tomorrow, the Guardian hands over control of its features content to 10 young trainee journalists. Look out for #G2GenY on your dash. 

Read the manifesto in full

How young people’s lives have been destroyed by the cuts

If you were to line up every unemployed young person in Britain, they would stretch from London to Edinburgh. Here some of them explain how benefit cuts, unpaid work experience and vanishing career opportunities are wrecking their lives

Pictured: Huseyin Kishi: ‘I avoid any occasion when somebody might ask: “So what do you do?”’ Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian

Generation Y: the demographic the budget forgot

Age: Newborn.

Appearance: A red box of broken dreams and orphans’ tears.

Oh dear, I’m not going to like this, am I? Well, it depends – are you a pensioner?

No. Do you have a job?

I’m applying for lots of them. Do you have thousands of pounds in savings?

Course I bloody don’t. Then no, you’re not going to like it.

Ugh. Lay it on me. It’s a budget “for savers”, and people with savings tend to be old people. In fact, scratch that – given that times are hard all round, people with savings tend to be rich old people.

I’m amazed a Tory chancellor would only cater to the old and rich. Indeed. This budget is an absolute dream for pensioners.

Keep reading

Generation Y takeover: the issues that matter to us and why

From Monday the Guardian is handing over control of its features content to 10 young trainee journalists.

While they don’t presume to speak for a generation, in their manifesto they describe the topics they want to explore and debate – the media, sex, food, employment, globalisation and more – from their perspective of a difficult economic climate in a rapidly changing world. Read more

We will, of course, be tumblin’ everything your way next week. Look out for #G2GenY on your dash. 

9

The top 30 young people in digital media: Nos 10-1

The Guardian’s 10 trainee digital journalists invited Alex Hern and Matt Andrews from the Guardian, and BuzzFeed’s editorial director Jack Shepherd to help choose the most exciting people under 30 in digital media. Here’s their top 10

(1) Farea Al-Muslimi (2) Jamal Edwards (3) Dina Toki-O (not pictured) (4) Sorted Food (5) Hannah Wolfe (6) Jim Waterson (7) Mosa'ab Elshamy (8) Hannah Hart (9) Jerome Jarre (10) Cara Ellison 

Click photos for credit and captions