g flat

Here’s Galileo’s 7 month semi-stack photo! He’s 29 inches at the shoulder and 63.8lbs. Big boy! 2.5 more inches and he’ll be as tall as Bandit. 

3 notes walk into a bar

C, E-flat and G walk into a bar. The bartender says, “Sorry, but we don’t serve minors.” So E-flat leaves, and C and G have an open fifth between them. After a few drinks, the fifth is diminished and G is out flat. F comes in and tries to augment the situation, but is not sharp enough.

D comes in and heads for the bathroom, saying, “Excuse me. I’ll just be a second.” Then A comes in, but the bartender is not convinced that this relative of C is not a minor. Then the bartender notices B-flat hiding at the end of the bar and says, “Get out! You’re the seventh minor I’ve found in this bar tonight.”

E-flat comes back the next night in a three-piece suit with nicely shined shoes. The bartender says, “You’re looking sharp tonight. Come on in, this could be a major development.” Sure enough, E-flat soon takes off his suit and everything else, and is au natural. Eventually, C, who had passed out in the bar the night before, begins to sober up and realizes in horror that he’s under a rest.

So, C goes to trial, is convicted of contributing to the diminution of a minor and sentenced to 10 years of DS without Coda at an up scale correctional facility. The conviction is overturned on appeal, however, and C is found innocent of any wrongdoing, even accidental, and that all accusations to the contrary are bassless.

The bartender decides, however, that since he’s only had tenor so patrons, the soprano out in the bathroom and everything has become alto much treble, he needs a rest and closes the bar.

(Taken from this link)

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… I have no explanation for this other than I wanted to draw my two favorite webcomic characters being happy. (and lord knows Davesprite needs a bit of happiness in his life)

Btw it is transparent! (Roy G. Biv is from @enenkay‘s comic, Monsterkind)

Étude Op. 25, No. 9 in G-flat major, known as the Butterfly étude, is an étude by Frédéric Chopin. The title Butterfly was not given by Chopin (as is true for all Chopin pieces with such titles); however Arthur Friedheim said, “while some titles were superfluous, this one is inadequate.

Incipit of the Étude Op. 25 No. 9

The composition is a study of staccato – marcato alternations, marked throughout the piece. It is the shortest of Chopin’s études; it lasts under a minute played at the indicated tempo. The melody is created by playing a detached octave, then two non-detached octaves. This makes a four-note group, the structure of which is used during the whole piece to convey the melody. This structure of rapid octaves can pose a challenge to the less technically experienced. Another difficulty is in the constant switching of solid octaves to detached octaves. It is much more straightforward to simply play one or the other for the whole piece.

Performer:György Cziffra.This may not sound like butterflies, but Chopin did not name any of his works,  he did not like to name , so other masters named them.Maybe he did not write this for butterflies.

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daft punk discography appreciation: Random Access Memories (5/5)
released: May 17th, 2013
“The idea was really having this desire for live drums, as well as questioning, really, why and what is the magic in samples? Why for the last 20 years have producers and musicians been extracting these little snippets of audio from vinyl records? What kind of magic did it contain? Because harmonically the samples are just an F minor or a G flat, something not so special. It occurred to us it’s probably a collection of so many different parameters; of amazing performances, the studio, the place it was recorded, the performers, the craft, the hardware, recording engineers, mixing engineers, the whole production process of these records that took a lot of effort and time to make back then. It was not an easy task, but took a certain craftsmanship somehow cultivated at the time. ” - Thomas Bangalter [x]

Amaranthine – unfading or everlasting, eternally beautiful.  A playlist for wandering the halls of museums, gazing at the art with a sense of longing for incredible beauty; for standing upon the beach at night and gazing up at the stars; for gazing out the window and watching as the countryside passes by.

{ Listen on Spotify }

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Ballade No.1 in G minor Op. 23
Frédéric Chopin
Ballade No.1 in G minor Op. 23

Frédéric Chopin’s four Ballades are one-movement pieces for solo piano, composed between 1835 and 1842 in various parts of France and Spain. They are some of the most challenging pieces in the standard piano repertoire.

The term “ballade” was associated with French poetry until the mid-19th century, when Chopin was among the first to pioneer the ballade as a musical form. The influence for these four Ballades is claimed to be the poet Adam Mickiewicz. The exact inspiration for each individual Ballade, however, is unclear and disputed. It is clear, however, that they are a novel innovation of Chopin’s, and that the Ballades cannot be placed into another (e.g. the sonata) form. The Ballades have also directly influenced composers such as Franz Liszt and Johannes Brahms who, after Chopin, wrote Ballades of their own.
Besides the sharing of the title, the four ballades are distinct entities from each other. According to composer and music critic Louis Ehlert, “Each [Ballade] differs entirely from the others, and they have but one thing in common – their romantic working out and the nobility of their motives.”
The four ballades are among the most enduring of Chopin’s compositions, and are frequently heard in concerts today.


The Ballade No. 1 in G minor Op. 23 is the first of Frédéric Chopin’s four ballades. It was composed in 1835-36 during the composer’s early days in Paris and was dedicated to Monsieur le Baron de Stockhausen, Hanoverian ambassador to France, and reportedly inspired by Adam Mickiewicz’s poem Konrad Wallenrod. Chopin seemed to have been fond of the piece; in a letter to Heinrich Dorn, Robert Schumann commented that, “I received a new Ballade from Chopin. It seems to be a work closest to his genius (although not the most ingenious) and I told him that I like it best of all his compositions. After quite a lengthy silence he replied with emphasis, ‘I am happy to hear this since I too like it most and hold it dearest.’”
The piece begins with a brief introduction which is thematically unrelated to the rest of the piece. It ends with a dissonant left hand chord D, G, and E-flat. Though Chopin’s original manuscript clearly marks an E-flat as the top note, the chord has caused some degree of controversy, and thus, some versions of the work - such as the Klindworth edition - include D, G, D as an ossia. The main section of the ballade is built from two main themes. The brief introduction fades into the first theme, introduced at measure 7. After some elaboration, the second theme is introduced softly at measure 69. This theme is also elaborated on. Both themes then return in different keys, and the first theme finally returns again in the same key, albeit with an altered left hand accompaniment. A thundering chord introduces the coda, marked Presto con fuoco, which ends the piece. As a whole, the piece is structurally complex and not strictly confined to any particular form, but incorporates ideas from mainly the sonata and variation forms.

Technically, many passages of the ballade require rapid scales, very fast and large chords, octaves, and difficult fingerings.
A distinguishing feature of the Ballade No. 1 is its time signature. While all the other ballades are written in strict compound duple time, with a 6/8 time signature, this ballade bears deviations from this. The introduction is written in 4/4 time, and the more extensive Presto con fuoco coda is written in 2/2. The rest of the piece is written in 6/4, rather than the 6/8 which characterizes the other ballades.

This ballade is one of the more popular Chopin pieces. It is prominently featured in the 2002 Roman Polanski film The Pianist, where an approximately four-minute cut is played by Janusz Olejniczak. It is also played in the 1944 film Gaslight and heard in the 2006 satire Thank You for Smoking. Many noteworthy pianists have performed and recorded the piece, including Vladimir Horowitz, Alfred Cortot, Arthur Rubinstein, Maurizio Pollini, Krystian Zimmerman & Emil Gilels.

Main Theme of Ballade No.1

Pianist:Krystian Zimerman

One of the most interesting interpretations I’ve ever heard. Every note was literally singing. Bravo.