funk,s

anonymous asked:

Is this plan suitable for people who need to lose a serious amount of weight? For example I need to lose 8 stone to be considered healthy even though I've already lost 3st. Also what advice would you give someone who has to overcome such a big challenge?

Starting is the hardest part! It seems impossible but once you find a routine you enjoy and get into the swing of things, it becomes a lot easier ❤️ if you ever find yourself in s funk, try switching up your daily life, not just exercise but your actual life, maybe go in a trip or just a shopping day or something and it can really help you and get you out of that funk :) love u

[★TRENDING] Band of Pikachu shows off their sweet dance moves to Super Junior’s “Devil”

Pokemon’s representative figure is taking over Japan as bands of Pikachu are showing off their dance moves to their audience.

While they have been spotted dancing to several Japanese tracks as well as American hits such as Mark Ronson‘s “Uptown Funk” featuring Bruno Mars, the one that has K-pop fans reeling is a group of 10 Pikachu dancing to Super Junior’s 2015 hit track “Devil”!

Though they are not dancing the exact choreograph from “Devil,” the video is absolutely adorable! (c)

George Harrison at The Beatles’ Seattle press conference, 25 August 1966

Photo: Wallie Funk

Q: “And a question. George, where do you get your sitars?”

George Harrison: “Where do I get them? Or where do people generally get them?”

Q: “Where can people generally get a sitar?”

GH: “India.”

[laughter] 

- Seattle press conference, 25 August 1966 [x]

anonymous asked:

Why doesn't jcole post a lot on social media?

From his interview w/ Funk Flex: 

“It’s a mixture of, A, I wouldn’t know what to say. With so many people listening, I don’t know what I would say to five, six million people. I don’t even know what I want to talk about to them, to those people. The other thing, I believe in staying away until you got something to say. I don’t believe in the art of talking to be talking or talking to be heard. I’m not into that. I’m not into thinking they’ll forget about me if I don’t tweet or they’ll forget about me if I don’t put up no pictures. I don’t believe that.”

4

On this day in music history: September 2, 1981 - “Controversy” by Prince is released. Written and produced by Prince, it is the eighth single release for the Minneapolis, MN born musician. Issued as the first single and title track to his fourth album, the song is a bold statement from the normally reclusive and media shy artist. Normally very private about his personal life, the songs’ lyrics will address the media and fans obsession with his sexuality, religious and political beliefs. The long album version of the track will feature Prince quoting “The Lord’s Prayer”, but instead of ending the scripture with “amen”, he will complete his recitation with the song’s title. That it in itself will lead some to label the song blasphemous. “Controversy” will peak at number three on the Billboard R&B singles chart, topping the Club Play chart for 6 weeks (from November 14-December 19, 1981 c/w “Let’s Work”), and peaking at number seventy on the Hot 100 (on November 21, 1981). “Controversy” will be re-released in the UK (as a 2 CD EP set and 7" picture disc) in 1993 to promote the compilation album “The Hits/The B-Sides”.

listen

Broath - HIMYM | Illuminati Confirmed - Air Horn | Best Friend Love - Vashta Nerada | Anaconda - Adam Crestani | I Got So Much Swag - Charlie Puth | Zedd - The Legend of Zelda [Air Horn Remix] | Say No Homo - Frank Stacks & L. Money | Dreck La Shrek - Miku Sawai ft. Smash Mouth | Bromance - Nigahiga ft. Chester See | Never Gonna Give You Up - Air Horn | I’m Not Gay - J Pee | Uptown Funk - Kidz Bop Kids | Smash Mouth vs Smash Mouth vs Smash Mouth - Dj Grumbles | No Homo - The Lonely Island | Take On Me - Air Horn | You Raise Me Up - Westlife

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Born on this day: August 29, 1968 - Singer, songwriter, and bassist Meshell Ndegeocello (born Michelle Lynn Johnson in Berlin, Germany). Happy 47th Birthday, Meshell!!

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On this day in music history: August 24, 1983 - “Future Shock”, the thirty fifth album by Herbie Hancock is released. Produced by Material and Herbie Hancock, it is recorded at OAO Studios in Brooklyn, NY, RPM Studios in New York City, and Garage Sale Recording Studios in Los Angeles, CA from Early - Mid 1983. Never standing still creatively, jazz musician Herbie Hancock will take his music in yet another innovative and unexpected direction. Hancock will ask bassist Bill Laswell and keyboardist Michael Beinhorn of Material to work with him on an album. Armed with an arsenal of new and cutting edge synthesizers including the Rhodes Chroma and the Fairlight CMI sampling keyboard, Hancock is joined in the studio with a group of musicians that includes Laswell (bass), Beinhorn (keyboards), Sly Dunbar (drums, percussion), Daniel Ponce (percussion), Pete Cosey (guitar), and vocalists Bernard Fowler (New York City Peech Boys, Tackhead), Roger Trilling, Dwight Jackson, Jr., Nicky Skopelitis, and Lamar Wright. The album’s centerpiece is the first single “Rockit” (#6 R&B, #1 Club Play, #71 Pop), composed in the studio by Hancock, Laswell, and Beinhorn. Laswell will enlist DJ Grandmixer D. ST (born Derek Showard) (now known as GrandMixer DXT), to add turntable scratching to the track (using the record “Change The Beat” by Fab 5 Freddy and Be-Side). Largely unheard outside of Hip Hop parties in New York City, the percussive of sound of D. ST’s scratching immediately turn heads. Laswell will take a tape of the unreleased song to a high end stereo store and play it on one of the stores’ demo systems. The producer is immediately rushed by customers wanting to know what it is. Released in June of 1983, the public’s response is the equivalent of a seismic wave traveling across the landscape. The song is supported by a striking and highly innovative music video directed by former 10cc members Kevin Godley and Lol Creme. The video will receive heavy rotation on MTV, winning five Video Music Awards at the first VMA awards ceremony in 1984. Amazingly, 90% of the singles’ million plus sales are for the 12" single release. “Rockit” will also earn Hancock his first Grammy Award for Best R&B Instrumental Performance in 1984. The musician will also turn in a highly memorable live performance of the song (featuring D.ST) at the ‘84 Grammy Awards. It will also inspire the international Turntablism Movement beginning in the 80’s, and exploding during the 90’s when DJ’s such as Qbert and Mix Master Mike site the song as a major influence. The album will also spin off two further singles including “Autodrive” (#26 R&B, #36 Club Play), and the title track. “Future Shock” will peak at number two on the Billboard Jazz Album chart, number ten on the R&B album chart, number forty three on the Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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Back when music videos meant something…

James Brown - It’s A Man’s World

1967

♫’“…PB PHOTO ack-212 Brian Setzer Singer with Evelyn King American Music Awards , Celebrity Photograph from the Personal Archive
of Legendary Photographer Peter C. Borsari…☺…”‘♫
http://www.cafr.ebay.ca/itm/PB-PHOTO-ack-212-Brian-Setzer-Singer-with-Evelyn-King-American-Music-Awards-/111754906480?hash=item1a051c8b70

So I’ve been in a little bit of a funk lately. It’s been hard to get out of bed and the ten hour days I work drag incredibly slow. The best way I know of to get out of that funk rut is to make a change. The change has been made 😜.

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On this day in music history: August 25, 1990 - “Jerk Out” by The Time hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 1 week, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on the same date. Written by Prince, it is the biggest hit for the R&B/Funk septet from Minneapolis, MN. The song itself is re-recorded from an unreleased outtake dating back to The Time’s second album “What Time Is It?” in 1982. Starting off initially as a drum groove programmed on a Linn LM-1 drum machine, Prince will begin writing lyrics and a melody around it, crafting it into a finished song. This early version is shelved when Prince comes up with “777-9311” for The Time instead. He will revive the song again in 1985 for the band Mazarati, whose version will also go unreleased. When The Time reunite in 1989 for the filming of “Graffiti Bridge”, they will also begin recording their fourth album “Pandemonium”. Prince will once again give the band the song (using the original drum program) to flesh out in the studio. Issued as a single in June of 1990, it is an immediate smash on R&B radio, also simultaneously breaking on top 40 pop radio.  "Jerk Out" is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

A drawing of and for krpsy

One of the most creative and fun people I’ve had the oppurtunity to talk with in real life🌊🌴

Once again, this was another wonderful challenge to do as I’m not accustomed to to drawing palm trees, varsity jackets, and internet motifs mixed with nostalgia. Very fun overall!