fruehstueck

Compared to the breakfasts of many nations, a typical Deutsches Frühstück is rather extensive. While I do not think that most Germans eat Spiegelei (sunny side up eggs) or Rührei (scrambled eggs) for breakfast or really take tea in the morning as pictured above (coffee usually rules the early morning), the rest (as pictured) is definitely what happens on the average German breakfast table. Cold meats as in cold cuts and assorted sausage and cheeses are served alongside a variety of breads and rolls. There are always some sweet toppings like honey, jam, marmalade, and Nutella. Soft-boiled eggs are common, and there may be some cereal, fruit, or vegetables like tomatoes or radishes. We’re obsessed with bread and rolls and have countless varieties, but usually only realize how good the bread and how uncommon our breakfast really is once we travel abroad, where it often just is some white bread and jam with coffee, or pastry. :) Other than the US and UK, we traditionally don’t do warm breakfasts at all - pancakes, bacon, baked beans, scrambled eggs or grilled tomatoes are not happening in the morning. It would be considered brunch or lunch by most. Muesli is the breakfast cereal of distinction in Germany rather than American-style sweet cereals, which many would consider to be kid food. Muesli is a mix of grains, seeds, dried fruit and other wholesome ingredients - like a granola bar in a bowl. It’s eaten with yogurt or milk. Many find muesli to be bland, though, so it’s a matter of taste. Bread/rolls and savory toppings like cheese or cold colds and jam are the main thing, and we usually butter our bread before topping it. The most common German breakfast beverage is definitely coffee, followed by fruit juices (usually orange juice, multivitamin juice, apple juice) and maybe tea and Kakao (hot chocolate) or milk. Cakes and pastries are more likely to be eaten in the afternoon as Kaffee und Kuchen.

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Another German breakfast

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A breakfast in Bremen, Northern Germany