frontlets

Tsimshian (Northwest Coast, British Columbia)
Frontlet (Amhalayt)
ca. 1880
Painted wood, abalone shell
The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

2

Chrysomándilo costume from Astypalaia, Dodecanese

Circa 1870

©Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation, Nafplion, Greece

This bridal and festive costume of Astypalaia, the chrysomándilo, belonged to the Palatianos family and, according to Irini (Rinaki) Palatianou, it had been passed down through four generations starting with her great-grandmother, who was born in about 1850. The chrysomándilo takes its name from the gold-embroidered, pearl-encrusted frontlet of its headdress. 

Words: C

Cache a hidden store of provisions, weapons, treasure etc.
Callimastian having beautiful, well-shaped breasts
Callithump a noisy, boisterous band or parade
Calumny the malicious utterance of false charges or misrepresentation
calumny        KAL-um-knee      a slander or false accusation
Canaille the masses; a mob, rabble
canard         kan-ARD      a fabricated story (French=”duck”; morte canard=dead duck)
cant      kant      insincerity
Capacious capable of holding much
Celerity swiftness, speed
Chaffer haggle, exchange, barter
Chamfrain the frontlet of an armed horse for a feudal knight, often engraved with designs
Chanteuse a female singer of popular songs, especially in a nightclub.
chimera        ki-MEER-ah   (not: chim-er-ah)      Originally: a mythical beast; any unreal thing; foolish fancy      (adj=chimerical     ki-MEER-a-cal)
Clinomania (n): “an obsessive desire to lie down.” Example: Without adequate sleep, you’ll suffer from more than clinomania.
cloy      to grow sick from an abundance of something
Cloyer a pickpocket’s accomplice or the one who intrudes into a bunch of thieves to claim a share
Colloquy a formal conversation or conference
comitatus      com-a-TAY-tus      loyalty to one’s band or group
Concatenate to link together in a series or chain
concatenation       con-CAT-a-nation      things linked together or joined in a chain
Congruous being in agreement, harmony or correspondence; conforming to the circumstances or requirements of a situation; marked or enhanced by harmonious agreement among elements
Contemn to view or treat with contempt; scorn
copacetic      “going just right”
Coruscate to give off or reflect light in bright beams or flashes; sparkle
Coruscating to emit sparkles of light; sparkle
Cosh a small cottage, hut
cosseted       KOS-a-ted     pampered
Coterminous having a common boundary
Coven a meeting of witches
Crapulous marked by intemperance especially in eating and drinking; sick from excessive indulgence in liquor
Croodle to creep close; a faint humming, the low music of birds
Cuckold a man whose wife has committed adultery
Cupidity inordinate desire for wealth; avarice, greed; strong desire; lust
cupidity       que-PID-a-tee      greed; avarice
Cyclopean having the kind of masonry used in preclassical Greek architecture, characterized by large undressed blocks of stone
cynosure  SIGH-na-shore      (from the Greek: “dog’s tail”)      center of attention; point to which all eyes are drawn.  (Really? From “dog’s tail”? Yes. The “dog’s tail” appears in a constellation, locating the North star, which rivets the attention of sailors at sea. Thus:     center of attention.) (see also: sinecure)

[America] well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself, beyond the power of extrication, in all the wars of interest and intrigue, of individual avarice, envy, and ambition, which assume the colors and usurp the standard of freedom.

The fundamental maxims of her policy would insensibly change from liberty to force. The frontlet upon her brows would no longer beam with the ineffable splendor of freedom and independence; but in its stead would soon be substituted an imperial diadem, flashing in false and tarnished lustre the murky radiance of dominion and power.

She might become the dictatress of the world: she would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit.
— 

John Quincy Adams [emphasis added]

This is the brilliance/totally depressingly prescient advice that comes right after the better known “[America] goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy” quote. I highly recommend reading the whole speech, linked above.