from the land of sky blue waters

When I fly I always want the window seat;
so I can watch city streets hum with headlights at night like haemoglobin flowing through veins. So I can look out and see the vast horizon quivering in the haze of summer heat. So I can see the shorelines of this land meeting the brine of the great blue ocean tides; little miniature white ripples breaking out on the boundless glimmering water - boats carving out ephemeral trails on their journeys. So I can see rivers and tributaries turn into estuaries and meet the sea like ancient friends joining hands. So I can see the glow of a sunrise or a sunset light a fire in the sky with its warm tones - painting the world with the most heartbreakingly exquisite pastels. So I can see the vast and colourful countryside divided into patchwork, like a quilt stitched from the hands of god, or some divine force bigger than we could possibly conceive. So I can see the mountains of green and brown erupting from the ground, casting darkly mysterious shadows into divots and gullies. So I can rise above the clouds and gaze upon the endless azure sky that overwhelms me with its brilliance and reminds me how infinitesimal I really am.
I always want the window seat;
So I can realise the complete majesty that surrounds me, and so that I can see -
So that I can see that while I’m not religious - there is clearly something greater than mere humanity, and it has given us the most wondrous of gifts; simply to exist here in this miraculous realm.
—  “So I can see” // @rarasworldbro
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Tsianina Redfeather was born Florence Tsianina Evans at Eufaula, in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), to Creek (Muscogee) and Cherokee parents. She was trained as a singer in Denver, sponsored in part by Alice Robertson .

At age 16, Redfeather joined pianist Charles Wakefield Cadman on tour, giving recitals throughout North America. Cadman, who was white, claimed expertise in Native American music, and lectured on the subject. As “Princess Redfeather,” Tsianina performed Cadman’s compositions in traditional costume, with long braids and garments she had beaded herself. Cadman’s composition, “From the Land of Sky-Blue Water,” was Redfeather’s signature song.

Tsianina Redfeather also knew archaeologist Edgar Lee Hewett, who attempted to compliment her by saying that he admired the shape of her head, and hoped to have it for his museum after she died. “He frightened me,” she recalled, “and I had a secret fear of having my skull on display for all to see.” (Hewett died long before Redfeather did.)

During World War I, she was the only woman in a YMCA-sponsored troupe of Native American entertainers who played and danced for troops in France and Germany, just before the armistice. For her service, she received a commendation.

The opera Shanewis, with music by Cadman and libretto by Nelle Richmond Eberhart, was loosely based on Redfeather’s stories of Native American life. It debuted at the Metropolitan Opera in 1918 and toured the United States. Tsianina Redfeather sang the lead at some performances, including at the Hollywood Bowl in Los Angeles, in 1926.

In 1935, Redfeather retired from singing. She was one of the founders of the American Indian Education Foundation (AIEF), and spent thirty years on the board of managers for the School of American Research in Santa Fe.

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My Dad still drinks Hamms beer and he sings this commercial every time he drinks.  It’s so catchy.

Prone to Dig

i knew it was falling from the dying summer sky
but forgot how it sneaks and surprises
then
i woke one day to find the world had died

i thought hard on hard times
days of treading water and digging holes
a shovel is the last thing you need
at the bottom of a well

all you can do is pray for rain

in the land of sky blue waters (waters)
thieves posed as free spirits
old men reigned the night
looking for a dollars and sense
and there was i

throwing dirt behind me like a fool
dig out or dig in
the deeper you go
time tells the same story

all you can do is pray for rain