from the hip la

Jackie and friends with Versace handbags at a private opening at the Versace store, Beverly Hills, California, 2007. (Lauren Greenfield/INSTITUTE)

Plastic surgery, private jets, toddlers in designer clothes, magnums of champagne — Lauren Greenfield’s 500-page photo collection, Generation Wealth, shows all of that. But this book isn’t just about people who are wealthy, it’s about people who want to be wealthy.

Greenfield says, “With the rich kids, I was looking at how they were growing up quickly, and how they were influenced by the values of Hollywood … [and] hip-hop culture. … Then I also photographed kids from East LA and South LA who, on the other side, were emulating the trappings of wealth.“

It’s like a feedback loop, she says. The rich kids want to look like the poor kids, and the poor kids want to look like the rich kids.

Don’t Be Fooled: ‘Generation Wealth’ Is More About Wanting Than Having

Thank you so much for the love & support of the video. It’s something that means a lot to me. I’ve never seen such a big response from my fans before
I’ve been reading some of the responses and I had a few thoughts:

Some people are accusing of being racist. I usually do not need to feel the need to explain myself(which I’m not) but I DO feel the need to share my thoughts on the situation. Nothing upsets me more than being called racist because that is one of the most hateful things anyone can be. Not only do I find it insulting towards myself but I also feel insulted for the actors & dancers & my family in the video. No, I did not use black back up dancers as “props”. I never have and never will look at any human being as a prop. That’s disgusting. It’s also an idea that has never crossed my mind,which is what I find questionable of the people telling me that I did so.Dancers are objects?!?!?! How dare you! Dancers make things come to life. If they were white would they be considered “props”? I auditioned a bunch of dancers,all races & my dancers were the best ones. I know that you have to be socially aware & mindful of others but when I look at this video I don’t see race as a issue.Stop trying to search for something that isn’t there. Comments like “rich little white girl exploiting the black people & the ghetto”…I never exploited anyone & I don’t use people in any shape or form. My brother is half black. My cousins are black. My family is Latina & Native American. Some of my family is in the video.I wasn’t raised in a “white” house hold & I’m not little & I have financially supported myself since I was 15 years old. I’m a woman,not a fucking little girl. Because I have pale skin & green eyes doesn’t mean I was raised in Beverly Hills and have Swedish film investor parents or whatever some have created in their minds. Would you feel more at ease if I danced with a bunch blonde white boys at a mall? Should I consciously only cast white dancers for now on? If I’m racist does that mean you’re pro-segregation?! I’m from LA & shot the video there. I referenced 90s hip hop videos and Michael Jackson because both of those things inspire me & played a big part of my childhood. The only thing I’m sorry for is if this post seems to come off self defensive,which it isn’t meant to be…but I had to share these thoughts because it drove me up the wall. Don’t demean the actors & dancers in the video. They are more well spoken & aware than you and I will ever be. Please do research before you make such shitty accusations about people. Anyways…Thank you SSENSE & Atom Factory Management & Grant Singer for making this video happen. We have been trying to make it for a while & I’m so glad I get to share it with the world now <3333333

—  Sky Ferreira (talking about the I Blame Myself music video)

SEQUENTIAL, the graphic novel storefront and reader app focused on literary graphic novels, has announced that it is releasing titles by legendary art comics and graphic novel publisher Fantagraphics Books. The first tranche of titles, released on Valentine’s Day, includes essential work from Fantagraphics flagship title Love and Rockets in the form of Jaime Hernandez’s seminal Locas series, which tells the tales of Maggie and Hopey and a unique cast of characters.

Fantagraphics associate publisher Eric Reynolds said, “SEQUENTIAL’s efforts to curate a quality selection of non-mainstream digital comics and graphic novels is something that we can get behind; we’re delighted to have our titles available on their app.”

SEQUENTIAL was released in August 2013 and is focused on book format art comics and literary graphic novels. It strongly rejects including superhero fare and has been offering titles from UK publishers Jonathan Cape, Knockabout, Myriad Editions, SelfMadeHero and Blank Slate Books. It has recently started adding major US-based graphic novel publishers to its list.

SEQUENTIAL founder Russell Willis said, “We are really thrilled to be able to add Fantagraphics titles to the app. When we started out we were driven by a vision of including the best work in the world, untainted by superheroes, and having comics and graphic novels from Fantagraphics available on SEQUENTIAL is a key part of making that vision a reality.”

The first tranche of titles includes Locas #1, #2 and #3 (Maggie the Mechanic, The Girl from H.O.P.P.E.R.S. and Perla La Loca) by Jaime Hernandez, Hip Hop Family Tree by Ed Piskor, The Left Bank Gang and I Killed Adolf Hitler by Jason, and TEOTFW by Charles Forsman. Work by Gilbert Hernandez and other Fantagraphics favourites will follow shortly.

In addition the app features the work of Alan Moore, Brian Bolland, David Lloyd, Eddie Campbell, Ellen Lindner, Hunt Emerson, Isabel Greenberg, Nick Abadzis, Rutu Modan, Winshluss and many, many more.

For more information on SEQUENTIAL and to download it for free from the App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id629759394?ls=1&mt=8