from earth to mars

10

The fantastic cinema of the 1950s

It Came from Outer Space (1953)
Invaders from Mars (1953)
The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953)
Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)
Them! (1954)
Tarantula! (1955)
Forbidden Planet (1956)
Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956)
20 Million Miles to Earth (1957)
The Black Scorpion (1957)

“voltron takes place in the near future”

Bitch where??????? Near future is probably like. 2020-2050 imo. We haven’t even gotten to fucking MARS yet and in Voltron canon they were able to get to Kerberos in TWO FUCKING MONTHS.

In retrospect: It took New Horizons TEN FUCKING YEARS to get to Pluto. NH’s speed varied across the journey obviously but averaging the Earth —> Jupiter speed (43,000 mph) with the Jupiter gravity boost (52,000 mph) we’ll say NH’s average speed was 47,500 mph (although this is probably really skewed cause by the time it reached Pluto it slowed to about 30,800 mph). Pluto is on average (not using Aphelion or Perihelion) 40 AU from earth. (abt 3,717,123,597 miles) 

This means that, factoring in the distance from Pluto to Kerberos (abt 36,000 miles) it’s 3,717,159,597 miles from Earth to Kerberos. It took a tiny, unmanned probe TEN YEARS to travel that distance. This means that, in Voltron canon, ships are able to travel 61,952,660 miles per DAY (given each month has 30 days, 30*2). In contrast, NH could travel about 1,140,000 mpd. Now from earth to mars let’s say it takes about six months with the current technology and the stuff NASA has planned. Mars is abt 140 million miles from earth. Divide that by 182.5 days (in 6 months) and that’s 127,853.88 miles per day. That’s with a ship with PEOPLE (and supplies, and everything else needed for the journey) on it with MODERN/POSSIBLY FUTURE SHIPS. IN 2016. So….yeah. I crunched some more numbers out of curiosity and it would take the voltron crew about 2 days to get to fucking MARS. MARS THAT TAKES US (give or take a month or two) 6 FUCKING MONTHS TO GET TO. They could get there in 2(.25) days. For us, going 127,853.88 miles per day it would take us SEVENTY NINE YEARS to get to Kerberos. I laughed really fucking hard abt this but GOD. Voltron is DEFINITELY not set in the near future. Because as things are now it would take us 79 fucking years to get to kerberos when it took Shiro and the Holts 2 months. So MY assumption is Voltron takes place probably 80-150 years in the future just because of how fucking SHITTY our space exploration technology is. I know I read WAY to much into this and did way too much fuckin math but I just thought this was interesting.

sun – the one who keeps you warm, who is always brushing against you and ensuring that you have vitality, even if you don’t feel it. sometimes they get covered up by clouds or the moon or even the backside of you, but they’re always there and they don’t go away.

mercury – the one who’s fast-paced, who maybe even moves a little too fast for you. they’re too caught up in their own orbit to realize that you’re not having an easy time keeping up. they don’t know how to slow down, and so you get left in the dust.

venus – the jealous one. they’re on a different agenda than you, spinning off in the opposite direction, and yet somehow they manage to get upset when they see you absorbing heat from the sun. fiery red, they try to steal your warmth away by absorbing it themselves.

earth – the one who fascinates you. they’ve got an abundance of something nobody else has, and you’ll never run out of things to learn about them. they make you want to explore not only them, but everything that surrounds them, too.

mars – the easy one. they’re always close by, but they’re also dry and predominantly inhospitable. you can’t stay for long because they just don’t give you enough of what you need.

jupiter – the big one, the one you just can’t let go. they’re chaotic, and their love swirls around you like a cyclone that whips at your hair and tears at your clothes, that invokes a rare sort of excitement in your chest and never stops spinning.

saturn – the soon-to-be-lover you spot across the room at a high school party. they fascinate you with the way they seem to have a sort of light that radiates from them.

uranus – the one with a cold exterior and a diamond heart. they’re guarded, frigid even, and it takes time to work your way past all their defenses and into their core.

neptune – the mysterious one, who your mother takes one look at and rules them as “bad”. they have a short of shadow about their eyes and an impressive set of scars from all of the destruction that whips against their skin.

pluto – the one who is exiled and misunderstood. they seem small and meek, and will latch onto any source of warmth they’re offered, but the warmth is just a luxury because they survive just fine on their own.

—  the planets as people you may love in your lifetime // k.g

Hey so I’m thinking about Kara and M’gann again and I wrote some stuff because goddamn it I am gonna build this city from the ground up if it’s the last thing I do.


strange girls in a strange land

It’s never a secret. For the first time in Kara’s thirteen years on Earth, there’s no great revelation. There isn’t anything to reveal.

This weight that she’s carried with her into every relationship outside the Danvers that she’s ever tried to build since she landed—it suddenly becomes inconsequential, when they’re together. The fact that Kara is Kryptonian, that she is Supergirl. The distinction between Kara Danvers and Kara Zor-El and National City’s resident hero. The deception; the disguise.

There’s no pretense between them, no pretending, no parts to play. They meet in the ring as Supergirl and Miss Martian, and then a few days later Kara Danvers shows up at the alien bar—and M’gann knows. It’s not something she needs to deduce or figure out after they’ve known each other a while. She just looks at Kara and she knows—it’s just a simple unconscious observation, as clear to see as the gold of Kara’s hair or the blue of her eyes.

M’gann slides Kara an Aldebaran rum and Kara doesn’t even realize that she’s still wearing her glasses.

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THE MAXIMUM DISTANCE BETWEEN EARTH AND MARS IS 401 MILLION KILOMETERS, OR 249,169,848 MILES. THIS IS JUST OVER 22 LIGHT MINUTES. 

THIS MEANS THAT IF THEY INVENTED A SPACECRAFT CAPABLE OF TRAVELING AT LIGHT SPEED, PASSENGERS ON THAT SHIP COULD WATCH A MAXIMUM OF ONE EPISODE OF THE OFFICE OR COMPARABLE SITCOM, AND A SHORT EPISODE AT THAT, ON THE JOURNEY FROM EARTH TO MARS. 

ON AVERAGE, PASSENGERS WOULD ARRIVE AT MARS JUST OVER HALFWAY THROUGH THE EPISODE, 12 AND A HALF MINUTES IN, AND WHEN EARTH AND MARS ARE CLOSEST TO ONE ANOTHER, A PASSENGER WOULD BE LUCKY TO GET THROUGH THE THEME SONG, AS THEY WOULD ARRIVE ON MARS A SHORT 3 MINUTES AFTER THEY LEFT. 

TRAVELING FROM EARTH TO URANUS AT LIGHTSPEED WOULD TAKE A MINIMUM OF APPROXIMATELY THE LENTH OF THE FILM “THE DARK KNIGHT” AND A MAXIMUM OF APPROXIMATELY THE LENGTH OF THE FILM “BRAVEHEART.”

cosmic witchcraft 101: lunar magick ☾

The Moon is Earth’s only major natural satellite. Scientists believe it formed about 30-50 million years after the rest of our solar system. While there are several ideas as it how it formed, the most widely accepted hypothesis proposes that in the first few million years after the Sun’s birth, the Moon was formed from debris from a cataclysmic impact between Earth and a Mars-sized body called Theia.

Facts:

  • Relative to the size of the planet it orbits, the Moon is the largest planetary satellite in our solar system.
  • The Moon is the second densest satellite in our solar system, coming in behind Io.
  • Eclipses occur during an astronomical event called a syzygy, when three celestial bodies (in this case - the Earth, the Moon, and the Sun) are aligned.
  • Despite being the second brightest object in the night sky, the Moon is about as reflective as worn asphalt.
  • Even though they display half of the Moon’s surface area, quarter moons are only 25% as bright as the full moon.
  • The distance between the Earth and Moon is slowly increasing. Hundreds of millions of years in the future, its angular diameter will have decreased so much that total eclipses will never happen again.
  • Lunar calendars may have originated as early as 30,000 years ago.

Magickal Correspondences*

Colors: white, silver, gray, light blue, red, orange, yellow, black

Intents: self-love, protection, absorb negative energy, dreams, balance, dealing with change, inner peace, starting new routines, balancing emotions, centering, turning your circumstances around, sea/ocean magick (tidal influences)

Herbs: aloe, nutmeg, willow, watercress, lily, jasmine, violet, fennel, poppy, parsley, honeysuckle, mugwort

Crystals: hematite, pyrite, peridot, rhodonite, enstatite, moonstone, silver, white quartz, opal, amethyst, selenite, pearl, aquamarine, rose quartz

*some of these correspondences are based on traditional associations and some are based on my personal associations

Yeah so I may have ended up rereading Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou, again. I might end up going through Aqua and Aria again. Also, Amanchu updated!

If you have no idea what I’m talking about these are some of the most calming and involving manga series there is, you should try them.

Yokohama Kaidashi Kikou is a bit mysterious, and thoughtful. It’s about the life of a (very human) robot named Alpha, running a café in a calm, eroding world.

Aqua and Aria are the same series, the author renamed the series after a few volumes. They’re both calm, charming, funny with some great thoughtful moments. It’s about the life of a girl from Earth (or Man Home as it is called) who goes to Mars (that has been accidentally flooded by terra forming and is now called Aqua) in hope of becoming a professional gondolier, or Undine, in Neo Venezia.

Amanchu is by the same person that did Aqua and Aria. It’s still on going and it has the same tone as Aria but is about diving. 

My personal favourite is Aria.

The artwork in all these series are amazing by the way, however Aqua and YKK start of with slightly wobbly art. It worth it in the end though.

Btw: Aria has a three season anime and YKK as some OVA episodes.

SWRI-LED TEAM DISCOVERS LULL IN MARS’ GIANT IMPACT HISTORY:
THIS CALM BEFORE THE STORM SUPPORTS LATE HEAVY BOMBARDMENT THEORY

From the earliest days of our solar system’s history, collisions between astronomical objects have shaped the planets and changed the course of their evolution. Studying the early bombardment history of Mars, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the University of Arizona have discovered a 400-million-year lull in large impacts early in Martian history.

This discovery is published in the latest issue of Nature Geoscience in a paper titled, “A post-accretionary lull in large impacts on early Mars.” SwRI’s Dr. Bill Bottke, who serves as principal investigator of the Institute for the Science of Exploration Targets (ISET) within NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI), is the lead author of the paper. Dr. Jeff Andrews-Hanna, from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in the University of Arizona, is the paper’s coauthor.

“The new results reveal that Mars’ impact history closely parallels the bombardment histories we’ve inferred for the Moon, the asteroid belt, and the planet Mercury,” Bottke said. “We refer to the period for the later impacts as the ‘Late Heavy Bombardment.’ The new results add credence to this somewhat controversial theory. However, the lull itself is an important period in the evolution of Mars and other planets. We like to refer to this lull as the ‘doldrums.’”

The early impact bombardment of Mars has been linked to the bombardment history of the inner solar system as a whole. Borealis, the largest and most ancient basin on Mars, is nearly 6,000 miles wide and covers most of the planet’s northern hemisphere. New analysis found that the rim of Borealis was excavated by only one later impact crater, known as Isidis. This sets strong statistical limits on the number of large basins that could have formed on Mars after Borealis. Moreover, the preservation states of the four youngest large basins – Hellas, Isidis, Argyre, and the now-buried Utopia – are strikingly similar to that of the larger, older Borealis basin. The similar preservation states of Borealis and these younger craters indicate that any basins formed in-between should be similarly preserved. No other impact basins pass this test.

“Previous studies estimated the ages of Hellas, Isidis, and Argyre to be 3.8 to 4.1 billion years old,” Bottke said. “We argue the age of Borealis can be deduced from impact fragments from Mars that ultimately arrived on Earth. These Martian meteorites reveal Borealis to be nearly 4.5 billion years old – almost as old as the planet itself.”

The new results reveal a surprising bombardment history for the red planet. A giant impact carved out the northern lowlands 4.5 billion years ago, followed by a lull of approximately 400 million years. Then another period of bombardment produced giant impact basins between 4.1 and 3.8 billion years ago. The age of the impact basins requires two separate populations of objects striking Mars. The first wave of impacts was associated with formation of the inner planets, followed by a second wave striking the Martian surface much later.

IMAGE….Mars bears the scars of five giant impacts, including the ancient giant Borealis basin (top of globe), Hellas (bottom right), and Argyre (bottom left). An SwRI-led team discovered that Mars experienced a 400-million-year lull in impacts between the formation of Borealis and the younger basins.

Lull in Mars' giant impact history discovered

From the earliest days of our solar system’s history, collisions between astronomical objects have shaped the planets and changed the course of their evolution. Studying the early bombardment history of Mars, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the University of Arizona have discovered a 400-million-year lull in large impacts early in Martian history.

This discovery is published in the latest issue of Nature Geoscience in a paper titled, “A post-accretionary lull in large impacts on early Mars.” SwRI’s Dr. Bill Bottke, who serves as principal investigator of the Institute for the Science of Exploration Targets (ISET) within NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI), is the lead author of the paper. Dr. Jeff Andrews-Hanna, from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in the University of Arizona, is the paper’s coauthor.

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