frogfishes

cuttlefish by DorinMantoiu From Palawan we have a direct flight to Cebu. The plane leaves 30min ahead of schedule, they were done with the boarding :) From Cebu it’s a 3.5h drive to the northern tip of the island and a 30min boat ride to Malapascua. We’re back at Ocean Vida and diving with Martin at Sea Explorers. We were here 4 years ago and liked it a lot. The next four days are getting up before 5am to dive with thresher sharks, followed by a day trip to one of the closer by islands to dive there. I like Gato Island most, frogfish and lots of critters, even bumblebee and harlequin shrimps. Sambawan Island has beautiful coral reefs, holders covered in pink and blue broccoli coral or forests of white, orange, green black corals. For the thresher sharks we went to a less crowded alternative dive site, totally worth it, got to see them very close by and in 20m depth only, so better light for Dorin’s fotos. After a day full of diving we hang out in the beanbags at the beach. And go to bed early, cause 5am wake-up….

youtube

Two Hairy Frogfish (Antennarius striatus) walking around at Lembeh Strait, Indonesia

video footage: Natalie Bondarenko | Youtube

seahorse by DorinMantoiu From Palawan we have a direct flight to Cebu. The plane leaves 30min ahead of schedule, they were done with the boarding :) From Cebu it’s a 3.5h drive to the northern tip of the island and a 30min boat ride to Malapascua. We’re back at Ocean Vida and diving with Martin at Sea Explorers. We were here 4 years ago and liked it a lot. The next four days are getting up before 5am to dive with thresher sharks, followed by a day trip to one of the closer by islands to dive there. I like Gato Island most, frogfish and lots of critters, even bumblebee and harlequin shrimps. Sambawan Island has beautiful coral reefs, holders covered in pink and blue broccoli coral or forests of white, orange, green black corals. For the thresher sharks we went to a less crowded alternative dive site, totally worth it, got to see them very close by and in 20m depth only, so better light for Dorin’s fotos. After a day full of diving we hang out in the beanbags at the beach. And go to bed early, cause 5am

Is it Real Submission
External image
Thank you once again to @marine-enclosures for a very cool submission!

Yes this odd animal is real! It is the Red Lipped Batfish!

This was a tricky one, I’ve never seen this before and at first I thought it was a type of frogfish (it has a very similar face and similar fin adaptations, but a different body structure).

The Red Lipped Batfish is native to the Galapagos Islands and can be found along the ocean floor ranging from a depth of 3 to 76 meters. Their diet consists of small fish, crabs, shrimp, and mollusks.

Most notably these fish have a series of adaptations that make them almost unrecognizable as fish! Its pectoral, anal, and pelvic fins are modified in such a way that the Red Lipped Batfish can actually sit on the sea floor. The modified pectoral and pelvic fins can also be used for “walking” along the ocean floor. They can swim,but only for short distances.  An elongated, horn-like snout attracts prey (similar to Angler fishes). And of course their bright red lips that biologists believe may be used for attracting mates, but their actual function is still unclear.

Altogether a very odd but very interesting animal. This video has a short clip so you can see how the Red Lipped Batfish moves.

I aboslutely love ths little guy´s grumpy face.

Frogfish, a type of anglerfish, yes like a little fisherman they have a lure to attract prey right into their mouths, use their pectoral fins to walk around the reef,

Maybe he is so grumpy because he is tired of having that sandy feeling all over his body.

youtube

We at The Reef-World Foundation are always coming up with new tools to help marine businesses be more sustainable through our main project Green Fins. Our latest releases are How-To-Videos; a step by step guide to a more environmental business. 

This week’s video is ‘How to Manage Underwater Photographers’. Over the years I’ve heard so many complaints about underwater photographers - you can get so distracted in the effort to get that perfect shot you forget your underwater manners. The damage this can cause is compounded by the fact that dive guides often rely on the tips they get - and some photographers pay big bucks for the guide’s help to manipulate marine life, or turn a blind eye if they are over-flashing a critter. 

I had so much fun playing the “naughty” diver on this shoot - not only because it was a break from setting an example on every dive, but because I passionately believe one can take breath-taking, award winning photos without stressing that seahorse /frogfish/ nemo/ turtle half to death. 

No photo is worth it if it means that creature ‘moves house’ or stressed to the point of no return. Make sure you tell your guide help you not to touch the reef, to keep you steady and to remind you if you’re using too much flash and then TIP them for that behaviour. It will make the world of difference. 

NB. No marine life was hurt in the making of this video.

Frogfish are a type of anglerfish that often use aggressive mimicry to resemble a potential meal for its prey while also concealing itself from predators. Frogfish rarely swim but prefer to walk along the ocean floor using their pelvic and pectoral fins.