freshman

How to Never Fall Behind in Classes

Alternatively titled: How to Use Your Planner or How Organization and Discipline Will Get You Better Grades

This is my full guide on how to use your planner effectively and make sure that you are never missing deadlines or falling behind in classwork and homework. This is definitely more about the university level and works best with a dated planner, rather than a bullet journal. Let’s get started! 

  1. Get all of your syllabi together and write down dates. Go through one class at a time and mark down all of your major tests and assignment due dates. I recommend putting these dates into the monthly and weekly views, and perhaps coming up with a symbol or other indicator that tells you they are of utmost importance. 
  2. Make a weekly schedule of when to complete readings and do a weekly review of notes. Instead of trying to randomly decide when to do these things, assign a date for each task for each class. If you have a tutorial on Tuesday, do the assigned readings for it every Wednesday. I recommend scheduling one to two weekly tasks per day, and to leave a few days open, whether it be weekends or days when you have a lot of classes.
  3. Make a master list of assignments. I find that sometimes, even having due dates in the calendar view isn’t enough, and they can still sneak up on you. The master list will be a good place to double check if you have any deadlines approaching easily. 
  4. In the week or so before a due date, create a checklist of smaller tasks needed to complete the assignment. Set individual due dates for each smaller task by working backwards from the due date. Smaller tasks may include finding sources, making an outline, writing a rough draft, and editing and adding references to create a final copy. Write the smaller tasks into your daily to-do list. 
  5. You can also do this with studying for tests, but the checklist would look slightly different. You could either sort by study method (first do flashcards, then do essay outlines, etc.) or sort by the topics you need to study. 
  6. Stick to the schedule you have made. Obviously, if something comes up and you need to move your to-do list around, do so! But if you aren’t doing anything and you see readings on your list of daily tasks.. do them. Having the plan set out like this makes it easier for you to remain disciplined. 

Why use this method? 

  • By creating a schedule for repeated weekly tasks like completing readings, you make sure that you can’t repeatedly push off smaller tasks until you are weeks behind. I don’t think it is very reliable to just will yourself to do readings, or to keep up with them without tracking it. 
  • By writing down all of your due dates, you will never be shocked to find out something is due the night before. You will know and you will be prepared. 
  • By creating smaller checklists of tasks to complete before a major test or assignment, you will never find yourself in a situation where you have an essay due in a few days and haven’t even started. You will be following a timeline and making sure you don’t have to rush.

I know this system may seem rigorous, but planning is the only way you can keep on top of your workload in university! Falling behind is a lot harder if you are organized and disciplined, and being on top of your workload will help you a lot when it comes to exam times… no cramming and all-nighters if you have been consistent all semester! 

tips for high school freshman:

1. i know, i know. this is terrifying. you’re going to be dealing with many huge changes. but change is good. remember that.

2. try not to blend in. i know its easier but you wanna make some friends, right? you probably want to make good relationships with teachers too. stand out. be remembered in the best ways possible.

3. work hard. strive to be the best. stay up late studying, take notes, ask questions, stay after class, do whatever you can to achieve you’re goals. prove to yourself and everyone around you that you are capable of amazing things.

4. participate. speak your thoughts in group discussions. join clubs. play sports. don’t be afraid. you deserve to be noticed and listened to.

5. stay organized. use planners, label everything, color code, make files on your laptop, don’t keep unnecessary tabs open, and make sure you’re not a mess too.

6. try and make friends. i know how difficult its going to be but you’ll need them. talk to the people on your cross country team, talk to the art kids in first period, talk to the weird kid sitting next to you in assembly. just try and make friends. you need people, no matter how much it seems like you don’t. you will not be able to survive this alone.

7. study. make flashcards, copy notes, use quizlet, i dont care just study. your phone can wait an hour or two.

8. make sure your bag is fully stocked. y’know like extra change, deodorant, hand cream, pads, chapstick, etc. you never know what could happen.

9. its okay if you don’t talk to your old friends anymore. you’ll be okay. so will they. but if you ever find yourself needing to talk to someone, don’t hesitate to text them. they will listen.

10. take a warm shower every night. wash your hair twice a week. drink a glass of milk every morning and a glass of water every night. have a cup of tea while studying/doing homework. reward yourself with an episode of your favorite show. self care is important.

11. make sure to read and write daily. prioritize it.

12. don’t be afraid to express yourself. if your school has a strong arts program, use it. paint, sculpt, draw. find inspiration and create.

13. stay focused and don’t stray from your expectations.

14. find ways to stay motivated. decorate your desk, buy cute notebooks, imagine how far you’ll go by doing well in school.

15. mentally make a daily schedule to follow. repetition is comforting. while everything around you is changing faster than you can blink, take comfort in the fact that your morning routine stays the same.

16. school comes first, but try to make time for your friends. both old and new. you deserve to have some fun. but don’t feel bad if you’d rather stay home with a tub of ice-cream and a season of some netflix series.

17. there will be bad days. days when it seems like you can’t get out of bed. days when it seems like stress is the only thing you’re feeling. days when you just want to give up. but you have to fight through it. have a cup of tea. read that old book you love. watch some netflix. take a break. it’ll all be okay.

18. they’ll also be days when you miss your old life with every bone in your body. on these days, text your old friends. maybe schedule to hang out. or maybe look at old pictures and videos and reminece on all the fun times you had together. don’t feel sad for too long. many more joyous memories will be created.

19. time heals everything. when days are gloomy and your heart is a lil heavy, remember that there is nothing that the passage of time cannot fix.

20. try to finish all your homework before dark. open the windows. welcome the fresh air and let the sunlight motivate you.

21. spend time with your family. you only have so much time left with them before college, don’t waste it. put down your phone, and just enjoy their presence. 

22. relativity is everything. i know it seems like one thing is the end of the world, but take a moment to zoom out. you’ll realize that some things are not big as they seem.

23. be fearless. take big steps. this is your time.

—  throughout my freshman year i wrote tips down to help myself. i hope this helps others as well.
Things I learned you’ll actually need for your dorm after one year of college that you probably won’t see on pinterest

So, I recently finished my first year at college (which was definitely an adventure, and probably one of the best years of my life so far) and I’ve made a few mistakes, but none that couldn’t be fixed. For example, I really didn’t do adequate research as to what I’ll actually need for my dorm room because I was too busy fantasizing how I was gonna diy decorate my dorm room into a pinterest masterpiece. Anyway, I quickly learned my lesson.

Basically, your dorm room isn’t just for display. You live there. It’s gonna get messy, it’s gonna have to store a lot of stuff, and you’re not always going to have time to keep it in pristine condition because life gets crazy. But you can deal with it, I promise, and for all the new freshman prepping for their first dorm experience, I want to give some advice on how you can be prepared for what college life actually hits you with.

Alright, so I actually ended up being in a triple (so I had two roommates) which meant I had even less space than the average broom-closet sized dorm room and I had two people I had to get along with. Thankfully, we all ended up being really close and very considerate of each other, and I am incredibly grateful for it. We learned our lessons together, and this is the list of stuff we came up with:

1. Vacuum: Get a real vacuum, maybe a cheap one (not like a crazy dyson), but a real one. Not just a handheld one (like we had) because it won’t be enough. Girls shed hair. A lot. (especially three long haired girls like us) People might accidentally spill a bag of powdered sugar on your rug, or you might rip open a bag of cereal a little too vigorously, or, more seriously, you might break something like glass and you don’t want anyone cutting open their foot on a shard. 

2. Swiffer: If your floor was linoleum like ours (that’s why we needed a rug, which I’ll mention later), then it will get dusty and dirty. Having a swiffer is just nice to have because once you vacuum your rug clean, you don’t want the dirt on the linoleum getting on the rug. Plus, it’s gonna a rain and there’s gonna be mud. It’s gross.

3. Brita filter: So my dorm was actually the absolute best freshman dorm not just because the people were amazing, but because we had sinks. IN OUR ROOMS. It is just so CONVENIENT. Anyway, I am fully aware that not everyone is as lucky as us and the only sinks will be in the bathroom. A Brita filter pitcher is nice to keep in your fridge because you can have fresh clean in your room at any given moment.

4. Trash can: We had three in our room for each person but they kinda ended up being shared based on location in the room, but yeah. You need somewhere to throw away stuff.

5. Plastic bags or just garbage bags: And not only do you need a place to throw away stuff, you need plastic bags or garbage bags for clean disposal. And trash piles up real fast in your tiny room, so you’ll need to replenish these bags very often. I learned from my mom that you always have a place to store your plastic bags, and so we had a designated plastic bag drawer where we kept all the bags from our local campus convenience store, or the drug store, or wherever. Trust me, it’s saved lives. (as in, barf bags)

6. Command hooks: So we had to bunk two beds and loft another to have enough room and it’s kind of a pain in the ass to constantly climb down to throw something out so we had a trash bag hanging from a command hook on my roommate’s lofted bed and yeah. That bag has saved lives. (same situation as above) Plus, you can hang hats, bags, towels, little caddies for your toothbrush off of these hooks and it’s just so nice because you don’t lose things.

7. Clorox wipes: Again, stuff gets gross, and you’ll unfortunately need to clean things (ie your mom doesn’t clean everything for you anymore). Have two packs stored because you never know.

8. Dish soap: Real dishes need to be washed well, or else you’ll get sick.

9. Sponges: For the dish soap. And the dishes.

10. Windex: For our mirror, which we wrote on with washable marker, and I killed ants with it too. 

11. Storage for food: Something airtight so bugs can’t get to it, like a trunk. We also had mice sometimes go into our vents. And then into people’s rooms. They’re looking for a warm place to hide, and food. Don’t leave food out is the lesson. But also have food in your room! Our room was well known to always have food and its really nice when you’re staying up late and everything is closed.

12. Tissues: Freshman plague is so real. You will most certainly get it, and probably several times too. 

13. Vitamins and medicine: Your immune system is gonna get a work out in college. Help it out with some vitamin C tablets. Have some tylenol or advil for headaches and aches and pains. And side note, if you’re really sick, just go to the health center, you don’t have to suffer through it.

14. Slippers: Get a comfy, cheap pair (because sometimes dorm hallways are gross, especially on the weekends) that you can wear all around your building and still be comfy.

15. Power strip: So much stuff needs to be plugged in and you definitely won’t have enough outlets between you and your roommate(s).

16. Printer: Okay, this seems a little unreasonable, but we were lucky because my one roommate had a spare one at home (how though??) and I have frequently said it is my favorite thing in our room. It has come in clutch so many times. But if you have a campus printer near you, or if its too expensive, it’s fine not to have one. But if you do get one, I would recommend getting one that is NOT wireless. University wifi doesn’t like you using other wifi (ie it won’t work). Get a printer that has a cable.

17. Plastic plates and forks: We have real dishes and silverware too, but plastic stuff is just easier clean up.

18. Rug: I almost forgot about this one.The floor gets cold and a rug also makes a room feel homier. You and your friends are gonna sit there and bond all that fun stuff, and someone might even sleepover on it (if they have a sleeping bag).

19. Chairs: So we actually didn’t have any other chairs other than the ones that university gave us for our desks and those are okay and everything, but some of our friends had these amazing, foldable, springy chairs that were so comfortable and also a lot of fun, and I am definitely getting one for my room next year. 

Other things you might need but might forget (maybe?):

Razors

Umbrella

Rain boots

Rain coat

Extra towels

Contact solution

Favorite mug

Tea

Stapler

Make up wipes

Facials

Lamp

Of course, this is not an exhaustive list, you’ll definitely need other things (like a fridge, microwave, sheets, pillows, decorations, etc), or see that you really don’t need some of the things I’ve mentioned. Honestly, do what you feel is best and good luck! I loved my first year at college! Like basically everyone, I had some trouble adjusting at first. I felt pretty lonely in the beginning too, but once you start going, things start to fall into place. I met some great people, had some great classes, and honestly, I’m going to miss my first year–even with all the excitement of being an upperclassman next semester.

I hope this helped and that you have just as great of an experience in your first year as I did–actually, even better!

High School In Review (so far)+ Some Tips!!!

Hello everyone! I’m Niva and I am a student of the High School class of 2019.

Now I’ve been in high school for 2 years now, so I think that can give some pretty solid advice to ya little upcoming freshman and any person who is still struggling in high school. So buckle up ya seat belts and put on some shades, cause we’re about to take a LONG ride

I know there are tons of freshman advice videos and posts out here on tumblr dot com, so I’m gonna try and make mine unique

*Note: My HS experience is unique; your may not need any of these tips, so who knows. Also, this post contains profanity. I don’t know if y’all care, it just seems that the studyblr community are all these sweet angels who attend church every Sunday and read the Bible in their spare time.

~=+=~FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEAR~=+=~

my freshman overview: Look, this year was hardest compared to my sophomore year. One class literally ruined my life, my dudes. {humble brag} Throughout my entire life from PreK to 8th Grade, I had gotten straight A’s on all my report cards. My freshman year, I decided to take AP World History and BOY did it crush me. I made a C in the class first semester and a B in the second semester. Now, it was not the teacher at fault. In fact, I LOVED the teacher. I just was not interested in that class at all and the work matched with me being in Marching Band nearly sent me to my death bed. I’m not trying to scare you, I’m just being 100% legit. This is also a PSA to all freshman offered to take APWH: This is one of the harder AP courses, and I wish one of my teachers had told me this before I decided to take the class (they probably did and I ignored them). This also was my first year in marching band and I’m telling you right now, if you’re wondering whether or not you should do marching band, do it. Even if you just do it for one year, it’s fuckin worth it mate. 

my sophomore overview: This year was SIGNIFICANTLY easier. During my freshman year, the way the schedule was set up was an A/B schedule; your schedule would alternate. On A days, you’d have these 4 classes and on B day, another 4. My sophomore year, they changed that and it was a bit easier for me. Not that I didn’t like the A/B schedule (I loved it), it was just a lot easier to manage classes. I only had one AP class this year, because I couldn’t take AP Lang because of schedule conflicts. ANTYWAYS, AP Gov is one of the easiest classes I took. My teacher was extremely chill and put a curve on every test and quiz, so that’s mainly why I didn’t fail. Marching band was much easier to handle since I already had experience. This was also the year I quit TSA (technology student association) and VEX Robotics, due to scheduling conflicts with band. And, to be quite honest, neither of the clubs were fun lmao. Literature class was annoying, because I got stuck in a class that DIDNT WANNA DO ANYTHING. They didn’t wanna read along, read at all, do projects, breathe, etc. (if you need tips on how to handle a trash class, just ask and I might make a post on that lol). Chemistry was purgatory, not hell, just purgatory. It was hard but not too hard that I didn’t pass. Math has never been hard for me so nothing really changed with that class. This year I brought back my streak of All A’s, so this school year was the best of the two in my eyes.

~=+=~The TIPS~=+=~

1. Normally, freshman don’t take AP classes, but if you are, be prepared. Depending on the class subject, you’re gonna have to do a hell of a lot more than just read the chapters once and do one page of notes. Try to always be ahead of the class and start some sort of study group. 

2. You’re best friend does not need to be your project partner all of the time. Seriously. If you have friends like mine, you will sit on your phone looking at memes on twitter for a long ass time before you ever start your project. Try doing a solo project every once in a while.

3. Don’t randomly join clubs. I was offered to join BETA Club and I didn’t wanna do it, so I didn’t. Don’t do clubs cause it looks nice cause 90% of the time, that one club won’t affect anything.

4. Save money. If you’re in marching band, dear god, save your money. School might as well be charging you to breathe. Everything cost SO MUCH MONEY. If you need to, set up a secret money jar so your parents don’t hijack your money.

5. Make new friends. Unlike most people apparently, I didn’t lose any friends. I do talk to certain people less because of class schedules, but we’re still friends. There is a small ass chance you’re gonna get caught in a class full of upperclassmen and no friends, and I had that situation. It’s not fun. Eventually, you’ll make a friend in that class, so don’t panic. But, anyways, new school, why not make new friends?

6. Don’t? Switch? Lunch? Tables? Okay, I don’t mean that someone’s gonna like sucker punch you out of your seat like in the movies. I mean like if we’re 5 months into the school year, don’t just randomly change your table, because …just don’t do it.

7. Don’t be that person who purposely gets on the teacher’s nerves to make class harder.

8. If you hate one of your teachers, suck it up buttercup. You have a choice of passing or failing, don’t let a teacher ruin an A in class for you.

9. Try and be on the other side of drama. It’s much more fun to watch drama go down, that to actually be involved in it.

10. Be early (if you can). I ride the bus, so I have no choice. But, there is legit no reasons for you to be walking into the class 10 minutes late, because you thought you could sleep an extra 5 mins.

11. I know your literature class is getting boring. This is probably your 7th consecutive year of learning the difference between a simile and a metaphor. I don’t know why they continue to reteach that stuff, but they do. All I can say is utilize what their teaching in some way, so that you don’t feel like the class is completely useless.

12. We all have that one class that you just do nothing in. Take advantage of that and get work done. I don’t have a “study hall” class so, any time you have to do work, use it.

13. Go to at least some of the school events. You can get relatively free food. 

14. Look, I could not care less if you skip school. But, don’t do it often and if you can, don’t do it ever. 

15. If you’re gonna eat in class, don’t eat something obvious like Lays Chips or a whole orange

16. Make friends with your teacher. Don’t be like creepy, but like, don’t have a bad relationship with your teacher.

17. Sophomore year, start thinking about college. You may think it’s too early, but it’s not. At least have an idea of what you want to major in.

18. If you can, get your permit as soon as you turn 15. Please don’t be like me. I still cannot drive and getting from Point A to Point B is harder than the VESPR Theory.

19. Disrespectful classmates are just an opportunity for you to get special privileges in class. If you’re class is disruptive and you’re just a sweet little angel, the teacher will most likely be more lenient with you. My teacher literally gave me a 100 on a project I turned in a day late (supposed to be 5 points off) because literally me and this other girl were the only ones who turned the project in.

20. Do your homework the day you get it. I don’t give a damn if it’s due in two days or two months, do it right then and right there.

21. In your language class, please try. Nobody likes the kid who doesn’t participate. If the teacher asks,  ¿Como estas?, you better fuckin say ¿Bien, y tu? back.

22. If you’re in a situation like mine, you’re gonna have a class you didn’t sign up for, yet somehow you got it. Just deal with it. If you can’t change your schedule, that’s all you can do. Just do the assignments and hope you pass.

23. Okay, most schools don’t have a “popular” group. But all schools definitely have the Prep group. You know, those kids. If you’re not one of them, just ignore them. If you are one of them, stop being so goddang stuck up and realise that you have an annoying voice. If you are not sure if you are a prep, you most likely are not.

24. My school doesn’t use lockers purely based on the fact that it would take too long for kids to get to them and back to class since my school is so big. So, if you also do not have lockers, make sure your bookbag can handle one full school year. I cannot stress this enough. You don’t wanna walk around school with a 15lb bookbag and only one functional strap.

25. Eat the school food. It’s honestly not as bad as the internet makes it. Like…eat ya pizza and enjoy it.

26. If your single and you want a relationship, please do not get a crush on random people like me. Someone would let me borrow a pencil and I would fantasize about a wedding for the next 2 days. I know it’s hard being lonely, but being in a relationship won’t get you a college scholarship.

27. Don’t drink a lot during school. There’s gonna be a teacher with a restriction on the bathroom because for some reason, they think bladders have a specific schedule to follow.

28. Don’t be that freshman that dates every senior in sight. If you have a relationship with a senior and it lasts, great. I’ve seen it happen, but 90% of the time it does not. 

29. Likewise, if you have a friend that’s running you up the wall with their problems, specifically relationship problems. Find a way to distance yourself from them, or even better, get them help from someone else.

30. If you have Type 4 hair (or type 3, it depends), you gotta do your hair at least 3 days in advance, especially if your hair is short. I don’t know a single person with kinky hair who can wake up and just simply throw their hair up.

31. Look, man. Just look here. Look at me in my eyes and listen. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, IF YOU ARE GONNA HAVE SEX USE A CONDOM! USE A CONDOM OR DONT HAVE SEX AT ALL. I’m not speaking from personal experience, but I many of girls have gotten pregnant at my school

32. If you’re gonna do drugs, don’t. Don’t be stupid. Especially if you’re in a school club or sport. You are subject to random drug tests at all times. 

33. Try not to let people affect the way you dress. Wear what you want.

34. Something about you is gonna change. Your personality, your look, your aesthetic. Whatever changes, don’t be stuck up. Nobody likes stuck up people; not even stuck up people like stuck up people.

35. You know those posts that are like “Grades don’t determine intelligence?” Yeah, well they don’t determine your intelligence, but they can determine where you get into college (if you wanna go) and how you’re seen and perceived by teachers. At least, try to pass.

36. If you can, take the ACT or SAT or whatever standardized test you have for your schools. I had an opportunity to take the SAT in 4th, 7th, and 8th grade for $35…and I didn’t take it once. I heavily regret it. Mainly I didn’t take it, because, at the time, it was hard for my mother to pay for it when we had much bigger problems, but like, if you have the opportunity and the funds to take those tests, take them.

37. Don’t rely on quality points. In my school (they’ve gotten rid of this now though), if you’re in an AP class you got 10 extra points and if you were in an Honors/PreAP class, you got 5 points. Colleges look at your grades without the points. The only purpose for these quality points is so that kids in CP classes don’t get valedictorian or some shit idk

38. If you’re in America, you’re gonna have somebody walking around school in a Trump shirt. By all means, beat their ass, but know the consequences. Also, if you’re gonna talk about politics with somebody, please know at least the bare minimum. At least know what the Hillary email scandal is before you try and defend her. Same goes for my friends across the pond. You see someone supporting Theresa May, beat their ass, know the consequences, and learn politics.

39. Actually? Check? Your? Grades? I know so many people who just don’t know what they’re grades are. Know you’re grades so you always know where you stand.

40. I wanna say class rank does not matter, but if you’re anything like me, you’re gonna obsess over it for a while. I know you wanna be in the Top 5, but if you’re no where near it, you’re gonna have to work EXTREMELY HARDER THAN NORMAL. Try not to make a huge deal out of it, unless you’re aiming for Valedictorian.

41. Moisturize ya self. Don’t nobody like ashy knees and elbows. Invest in some lotion.

42. Listen. We all hate dress code. But just follow it. You can’t do anything about it. Just wait til the weekend to wear your spaghetti strap shirt and ripped jeans. And if you wear leggings and you have a wide hip and butt area, you are definitely going to be called out. If you’re not sure if you’re breaking dress code with what your wearing, bring an extra shirt and jeans just in case.

43. Go the fuck to sleep. Don’t be up at ass o’clock in the morning doing who-knows-what on the internet. I know from experience. You may think you can survive 8 hours of school with 2 hours of sleep, but as the day goes on, you’re not gonna want do anything at all, but sleep. But hey, if 2 hours of sleep works for, go ahead. It’s not healthy but I can’t regulate your life.

44. If you walk in the wrong class, everyone will forget about it after the a good 2 days. Literally nobody cared that much. Just walk out and forget about it.

45. If you have a phone, get your friends numbers/contacts/emails. You’re gonna need them for homework sooner or later.

46. To all those uber religious people out there, drop the clean act. If you hear somebody say “fuck”, get over it. I don’t know how else to say it. Teachers cannot stop somebody from cursing completely. People are gonna have sex, people are gonna cuss, people are gonna be inappropriate, and all you can do is focus on yourself.

47. Wear deodorant. You will be surprised at the amount of people who don’t. 

48. Studyblr is fun. Studyblr is nice. That being said, studyblr is not the end of the world. If you don’t have a bullet journal, just use the calendar in your phone or have an online bujo. Don’t let studyblr take up 90% of your study time, because scrolling through the studyblr tag is not studying.

49. Don’t be that kid that walks around with fucking surround sound speakers on their back. Wtf, like invest in some headphones my guy.

50. Never buy a 1 inch binder. Always 2 inch and above, unless you know for sure you only need a 1 inch.

51. You are gonna have a set of people you absolutely hate that for some reason, you cannot get away from them. The best you can do is ignore them.

52. If you’re required to take a Fitness class and you are a festively plump child or an unhealthy/unfit person such as myself, you are going to be embarrassed at some point. Look. I cannot give you advice that’s gonna raise your self-esteem, but I can tell you that if you don’t pay attention to anyone else, it’s much easier to get through that class. The fitness gram pacer test doesn’t last forever. Likewise, don’t treat fitness class like the fucking Olympics. The coach asked for 10 pushups not 100.

53. Extra Credit is your friend. Even if you have a 100 in a class, extra credit doesn’t hurt.

54. Do not walk slow in the hallway, please. I like getting to class on time. If you plan on having a conversation in the hallway, only do it if you walk and talk at a reasonable speed.

55. If you ride the bus, get up at least 45 minutes before the bus gets there. I don’t have a big morning routine, so half of the time in the morning, I just scroll through twitter. Wake up early enough to get everything done.

56. C’s get degrees, my friend, but C’s don’t get scholarships.

57. If you wear AXE Body Spray or any perfume/cologne, I want you to know that your smell occupies the entirety of the hallway you’re on. Please, use only a small amount of fragrance, because not only do they most likely stink, some kids have asthma and some kids are allergic to fragrances. Just refrain from wearing strange smelling spays.

58. If you’re a theatre kid or sport kid, don’t be completely set on becoming a professional singer/actor/athlete. Have a Plan B. The last thing counselors wanna hear when they ask you what you want to be when you grow up, is a NBA Player.

59. To all my shy people out there, that speech you have to give doesn’t last forever. In fact, it may only last 3 minutes. In my literature class, we were required to recite lines from Romeo and Juliet, for some odd reason, and I made such a big deal out of something that barely affected my grades.

60. For this last and FINAL tip of this post, don’t give up. I didn’t wanna be generic, but here the fuck! I! am!!! When I took AP World History, part of the reason I ‘failed’ was because I just stopped trying. I would make low C’s on the test and just think, “Well I didn’t pass, might as well just give up.” Well, no shit you didn’t read the chapter. If you’re trying all you’ve got and you’re just not making it, talk to the teacher. That’s one thing I regret from my freshman year. I just gave up. I didn’t try and get help because I felt that getting help meant that I was stupid. It doesn’t. It just means you’re smarter for trying to get a good grade.

WELL THAT’S ALL FOLKS! Sorry if my cursing doesn’t fit your aesthetic, too bad. I can probably think of 40 more tips to make this 100, but I didn’t want this post to be extremely long (lol good job on that). Anyways, if you ever want any help, feel free to message me, but I’m not that good at text conversations or conversations in general so I’m your last resort.

TO THE UPCOMING FRESHMAN: Have a great first year of high school! You’re about to enter a new life where the teachers are more serious and, yes, coloring still somehow counts as a grade.

TO THE UPCOMING SOPHOMORES: I know. You’ve only been here one year and your tired. Have hope. You’re one year closer to that diploma.

psa for college freshman

hey, whats up, hello! so you’re gonna be a freshman and you’re probably moving in real soon, and you might be excited but also nervous, not to worry i got you! here are some tips and tricks and general advice based on my own experience. 

okay so step by step:

MOVE IN

okay so this is easily the most stressful thing about the first week of school. you gotta get all of your stuff into a tiny dorm if it’s a big room i am literally so jealous my dorm was like a prison so don’t freak out, stay cool and pack efficiently!

  • try not to overpack, it’s really easy to believe you’ll need everything you’re bringing but trust me you won’t even look at half of it
    • a good tip for this is, if you don’t use it at home, don’t bring it to school! (plus it’s really easy to just buy stuff you need on amazon so don’t forget that that’s an option too)
  • if you’re going to a school that deals in snow, DON’T bring that stuff (jackets/hats/boots/etc) with you when you move in. if you know you’re going to go home for a weekend before the snow sets in, definitely leave it at home and bring it with you later!
  • let your parents/guardians/friends/family help you move in. it might not seem like a big deal, but letting them help you will make them feel better. and if you don’t like how they arrange things, let it be! you have all semester to rearrange and settle in, they only have this one day, so just let them have it! also don’t forget to thank them when they leave!

ROOMMATES

ah yes, the wonderful concepts of roommates. i was lucky my freshman year, but some people aren’t

  • try and connect with them via facebook/school emails/phone, settling things like are you gonna share a mini fridge, microwave, coffeemaker and how you’re gonna decorate (if you’re into that) will help when you finally settle into your room
  • definitely go over ground rules once you’re all unpacked and settled in. my dorm had us go over a list of questions, come to an agreement, and sign it in case there were any future conflicts. cover things like: 
    • is it okay to have my friends sit at your desk or on your bed when you aren’t there?
    • how should we handle overnight guests?
    • do you want me to give you a heads up if i have friends coming over?
    • 100% agree to give each other a heads up on parents coming to your room
    • sharing food?
    • cleaning responsibilities
    • definitely definitely give each other a copy of your class schedule, and if you have classes at the same time maybe you can agree to make sure you’re both awake at the right time!
  • you don’t have to be bff’s with your roommate, sometimes it turns out that way and sometimes it doesn’t. what you do need to be is open and honest with your roommate. your year will be miserable (especially if you can’t switch roommates) if you don’t communicate with each other. don’t be afraid to tell them if something is bothering you. if you’re to nervous to do that or don’t like confrontation, talk to your RA or RD

so now that we got all that out of the way, here are some general tips about social things:

  • that whole keep your door open and people will come talk to you think is a load of bs. me and my roommate did that for weeks and no one came in. everyone is just waiting for someone else to take that chance. so go into peoples rooms and ask them if they wanna grab lunch/dinner! walk around and poke your head in their room! it might be awkward as hell but at least you’re trying :)
  • go to all (or as many) dorm activities as you can! this allows you to meet more people too even if the event is really dumb, at least show up. you always have the option to leave!
  • go to club meetings! even if you aren’t sure you want to stay in the club. it’s much harder or maybe just more awkward to join when you’re an upperclassmen, so try and get those roots down as soon as you can
  • that being said, you can always leave a group without any hard feelings. people do it all the time, so don’t be scared that once you go to one meeting you’re stuck in the group forever
  • don’t let anyone tell you that as a freshman you can’t get involved. if you want to, you can. there is absolutely nothing stopping you. you might have to work a bit harder but i know you can do it!
  • sometimes freshman year can suck, or at least have it’s moments. don’t give up. everything gets infinitely better as time goes one, i promise. if you’re having a tough time or feel isolated or overwhelmed, reach out to someone, a parent, friends from home, an old teacher, anyone really! don’t give up, things might get tough, but you ARE strong and you WILL get through it
Top Ten Tips for Freshmen

First seen on my Patreon!

Anonymous asked: Hey. I’ve been following your blog for awhile. Super cool and informative! I’m going to be a freshman in college this fall and I’m kinda nervous (like anyone would be) I’m gonna major in Music Ed. Any tips for incoming freshmen???

Congratulations on getting in! Honestly, that’s a great question. Here are my Top Ten Tips for Music Freshmen

1. Schedule in time to practice. Practice is no longer something you can do for twenty minutes when you get home from school. Pianists and violinists probably understand this already, but seriously everyone (singers especially): practice an hour a day, minimum, every weekday of your freshman year. It will help you out in the long run SO MUCH.


I’m a huge advocate for using Google Calendar for EVERYTHING, so just slide that hour of practice in between classes, or wherever it fits. Then stick to it. The difference between someone who buckles down their freshman year and someone who doesn’t tends to compound for the rest of their musical careers.


2. Schedule in time to eat. Okay, this might have been a Me-problem, but I had class straight from 8am to 4pm three days a week my sophomore year, and 8am to 8pm at least one other day that same semester. There was no lunch break in that schedule. My roommate thought I had died a couple times because I had gotten back to the dorm after she’d fallen asleep, and left before she’d woken up. DO NOT BE ME. Leave at LEAST one hour-long break somewhere in the middle of your long days. You’ll still have days that are just as long, but that break will make life so. Much. Nicer.


3. Leave your door open at your dorm, and keep it closed at your practice room. The friends I made my freshman year that I still talk to I met because we lived on the same dorm floor for like three years together. My SO, my best friends, yep, all of them lived on the same floor as me. I met them because I left my door open whenever possible, and so did they, and no one minded if someone came and sat on someone else’s floor. That’s a major method of bonding freshman year - don’t ignore it.


On the flip side, this does NOT HOLD TRUE to practice rooms. If you’re practicing, keep that door shut. If you want to talk to someone in the hallway, sure, stand in the doorway, but Do Not Do the Doot without shutting the door. That’s how you annoy the entire music program.


4. Walk everywhere, as much as you can. My freshman 15 was a negative 15, because I didn’t change how I ate but suddenly I was walking six miles a day. Yes, public transport is great if you live in a really far-flung dorm or something. But if you can buckle down and walk to class, or bike if it’s real far, then you can cut down on any guilt from not being able to hit the gym by at least half.


5. Just because there’s unlimited ice cream does NOT mean you should eat unlimited ice cream. On a similar note: yes, the soft-serve is great. Do NOT fill a salad bowl with soft-serve. Just don’t. It ends badly. Coffee poured into a mug half-filled with soft-serve? A much better idea, in moderation.


6. The friends you make in your first week will probably not be the friends you have at graduation. I still talk to my freshman group, but that’s because we were all remarkably level-headed people who didn’t really do the massive personality change some students go through their freshman year. I’ve seen way more groups, however, that cling together the first two weeks of school, and then try to force friendship for the rest of the year, regardless of actual compatibility. Just let it go, and be friends with the people you actually get along with. Join clubs and intramurals, if you need to.


P.S. Dating your freshman year is not worth it!!! Don’t do it!!!


7. Even if you don’t like your fellow music majors, be polite and courteous to them anyway. There’s always one or two people in your music program that you will not be able to stand. That’s fine. Do your best to avoid being in classes or ensembles with them. What you cannot do is: be cruel, talk behind their back, or otherwise be a rude and gross person to them. A.) That’s just mean, and you’re not a high school student anymore, rise above the pettiness. B.) The people you meet in college will be an amazing network for the rest of your life. Even if you don’t think that the person you dislike is a potential connection that will help you later, the people who hear you gossip or be cruel could be, and they will remember it. Always be kind.


8. Stick to the middle of the bell curve when it comes to talking in class. Don’t be the person talking almost as much as the professor, either to answer questions, interrupt, or whisper to your friends. And please don’t be That Guy, the one who thinks they know EVERYTHING and purposefully asks obscure questions to seem smart. On the other hand, you should try to answer some questions. Feel out the atmosphere of your program, and adjust your talking based on that.


9. MUSIC MAJORS CAN’T SKIP CLASS. Too many college advice things tell incoming freshmen that yeah, you can totally skip class every week or so, it won’t affect your grade, blah de yada blah. I don’t know if this applies to other majors (probably not any rigorous ones), but it certainly does NOT apply to music majors. You go to every class you can drag yourself to. If you have a major flu or something, email your professor and get the material. However, unless you are nigh unto Living Death, go to class. I learn really well on my own, and any time I missed a class I came back and immediately felt lost. DON’T SKIP CLASS.


10. It’s okay to switch majors - both within music and to something else. Music is a hard major to enter, but once you’re in it, it’s easy to shift your focus or leave. Tons of people enter as Performance majors, and leave as Ed., or vice versa, or switch Composition or Tech instead. Plenty of others drop music down to a minor and get business majors or something else completely different. All of that is okay.


The current requirement that kids who have been told to sit down, shut up, and listen for 12 years being expected to know exactly what their career path should be upon being handed a piece of paper at 18 is DUMB. So follow your passion. If your passion changes, that’s okay - just keep going. You’ve got this.

Tips for freshman in high school

I finished my gap year and with that my high school journey has officially ended. 4 years ago I was a freshman and here’s what I wish I had known:

  • stand up for yourself. In high school, we are all trying to figure ourselves out and everyone grows differently. Everyone is trying to fight for acceptance from each other. No matter what, you have to stand up for who you are. That sounds cheesy but all it means is: whatever you are right now, whatever you believe in right now, that’s what you have to defend. At all costs. Don’t give in to other definitions of living made my other people.
  • don’t push your parents away. They are going to be very scared as well and don’t know how you will react to being in high school. If you have parents, or parents who listen, make sure you are letting them know about your teachers, your friends, your classes, what you find most difficult, how the school is, etc. All they want is to be included in your life.
  • Right from the start, make a good impression. Let the teachers know you are a good student. Especially if you’re in public school. Let the teachers know you are caring, dedicated and willing to do good in their class. How you do this:
    • always ask and answer questions in class. It’s what distinguishes the top students in class. Even if you answer something wrong, it’s 1000% better than not saying anything for evaluation. Believe me. You also learn better this way.
    • how do you get past that fear of speaking in class? You don’t. Your heart will always beat a 1000 miles an hour. You make the jump and practice practice practice. It does get better with practice. Eventually, you, your classmates and the teacher get used to you speaking in class.
    • pay attention in class. This can be tricky if your classmates are really bad. The main thing is not caring about your classmates inside of the classroom. It’s binary: you’re either paying attention or not. Take notes, do extra exercises, anything to keep focus. Get a seat in the first horizontal rows if you can choose.
    • nod when the teacher is explaining something and you understand it.
    • look confused and write a question down when the teacher is explaining something and you don’t understand it. Ask the question after the explanation or during exercises time.
    • don’t use your phone or headphones in class unless the teacher specifically tells you it’s ok.
  • focus on your grades. Getting Good Grades IS VERY IMPORTANT.
    • have a grade goal you want to achieve for each class, maybe one that you think it’s unrealistic for you, those are the ones that make you work the hardest and give you the best results. Keep it to yourself or share, doesn’t matter, but keep it vivid (write it down) and remember it every time you have to study or step into the classroom.
  • don’t be intimidated by popular kids. They are just as insecure as you. Don’t blush when they look at you, you are just as important.
  • don’t worry about your clothes or makeup. Unless it’s a passion of yours. If it’s not, as long as your clean and comfortable, you should be good to go. Being attractive should be the least of your concerns.
  • you see those kids with the cigarettes and drugs and loud music? Run away, don’t look at them, don’t go out with them. For real. Stay safe.
  • have friends! High school is way more fun when you have friends to joke around during breaks. I was so lucky to find a close group of friends I felt safe and comfortable with and with whom I still go out and talk to this day, I didn’t plan for it to happen but it did and I’m sure it will happen for you too.
  • don’t leave things to the last minute!!!!! I’m serious. Start working on notes, exercises and reading right from the beginning of the school year. It will make things 10x easier. When you get to finals week, everyone will be stressing out and you’ll be that person who already read through everything twice, did every single exercise already and is annoyingly calm. It is possible. You just have to work right from the beginning and do small chunks of work every single day.

anonymous asked:

idk if you've done this already but do u have advice/tips for freshman year of college?? thanks so much in advance!! 🌞🌻✨

1. Take lots of different classes! Take classes that are not in your major, take oddly specific classes that don’t fit any degree requirements. There are people who invest thousands of dollars in school and get a degree, only to discover that it’s not what they’re interested in pursuing. Get out of your comfort zone!

2. Scope out all of the food service places on campus. These include cafes, stores, and vending machines. You’ll notice that the same item will be priced differently in different places. My college had a vending machine in one building that charged $1 for coffee, and the next building over charged 75 cents for the same cup of coffee.

3. Don’t buy new textbooks! For the love of all things wholly- there are other options. I would actually avoid buying textbooks until after your first class. Find out if the teacher will permit you to use an older edition of the textbook (these sell for a fraction of the price that the newer editions do on Amazon) or if they’re okay with you downloading the book as a PDF on your laptop. 

4. Get all of your teachers’ contact info as soon as possible. Get their emails, office phone numbers, and office hours. You’ll hit a certain point in the semester when you need to meet with someone one-on-one, and this information will be hella useful.

5. Less is more! Use one binder to store all of your notes and paperwork, unless a teacher specifically asks you to buy a specific binder for their class. Buy yourself a three-ring pencil pouch and stick it in your binder. Get yourself distinctive pencils so that you’ll know which of your friends are mooches.

6. Get yourself some dry snacks and keep your backpack or handbag stocked. Things like fruit leather, trail mix, or dried fruit. You don’t need to be dropping $$ every day at your school bookstore because you’re hungry. Buying snacks there is twice as expensive!

7. Don’t save all of your homework for one night. That’s so stressful and you won’t be able to do it all to the best of your ability. Spread homework out during your week- do it during breaks at school, sneak some in during work, do it during lunch. Get yourself study buddies and work with them!

8. Register for classes as quickly as possible. Classes fill up faster than you think, and not all courses are offered every semester. If there are classes that you absolutely need to take at a certain time or in a certain place, get your ass in gear and register ASAP. You can always change your classes if things change or you get more flexibility.

9. Ask older students for recommendations on teachers and/or classes. There are reasons why some teachers are more popular than others, have the best college experience possible!

10. Utilize campus resources! Most colleges have the following on site for FREE:

  • Career counselors
  • Mental heath counselors
  • Peer tutoring
  • Professional tutoring
  • Gym space
  • Lockers
  • Student transport (for free or for a reduced price)
  • Library with private study rooms
  • Practice rooms for musicians
  • Communication rooms (my community college literally had a video studio, a recording studio, audio booths, and video editing booths all available for students to rent for free)
  • Assistance applying for scholarships and/or FAFSA

And finally, something I didn’t believe until I started college- age literally does not matter. As a freshman you’ll be in classes with students who are significantly older and younger than you. You’ll make friends with people from all walks of life and backgrounds, and the more open you are the more positive experiences you will have. I promise!

Well, it’s that time of year again. School is just around the corner. In about a month, you’ll be starting your first official year as a college student! Let’s be real, you’re probably feeling some weird combination of terrified, excited, nauseous, and strangely independent, all of which is very confusing (as if moving, starting at a new school, and meeting 5000 new people in one day isn’t confusing enough). So, what can we do about this weird combination of feelings? 

Well, for one, I can offer you some sage wisdom (or something like that). You see, not only is this about to be my fourth (count ‘em, fourth) rodeo, but I specialize in helping incoming freshmen. I spent a year and a half as an RA, and I’ve spent the past year as an ambassador for my college of engineering, literally having the sole purpose of helping incoming and existing freshmen learn the ropes.

So, buckle up, because (and this is a long one, folks) here are Sam’s 20 pieces of advice:

  1. Make sure you have almost everything you’ll need for your dorm. Keep in mind that wherever you’re going will have stores, a fact your parents will point out multiple times, but also remind them that people will be coming from far away places, and they should get first dibs at the Wal-Mart shower caddies. (exception: if you are the one coming from a far away place)
  2. Play tetris with your stuff before the morning you move. Chances are you have a lot of junk, so don’t try to figure out how to make it all fit in the back of your hatchback the morning you head to school. Take some time in the days leading up to the move to make sure you have boxes that will actually fit in the back of your car.
  3. On the same note, don’t overpack. You need a lot less stuff than you think you do, I promise.
  4. Know that everyone is just as terrified/excited/nauseous/independent/confused as you are. You aren’t alone in this one. Which is strangely comforting.
  5. Once you get there, take note of what your RA actually looks like. I noticed this with my own residents, that even though I did their check in or filled out their paperwork, they didn’t realize I was the RA until about two weeks in. If you’re not sure who they are, or if they’re even an RA, let alone yours, just ask them. Once you figure out which one belongs to you, memorize their face so you know who to go to for help.
  6. Keep an open mind. Whether you’re meeting your new roommates for the first time or you were mildly concerned by your new neighbor across the hall, don’t make any opinions about anyone before you give them at least a week. Everyone is still figuring everything out, just like you, so don’t be too quick to judge.
  7. Let your parents/guardians/grown ups clean your room when you get there. They may not want to, but if they’re anything like my mother, they’ll only say they don’t want to and then start vacuuming and wiping down every surface they can find. Don’t try to stop them, just let it happen. They’re nesting for their little chick and it’s helping them feel better about abandoning you in a strange place.
  8. Don’t eat dinner alone in your room your first night. You don’t necessarily have to go out anywhere, you can eat Easy Mac, but see if your RA has anything planned or if there’s anything happening on campus. If not, take your Easy Mac or freezer dinner to the lounge and see who’s around.
  9. Introduce yourself to as many people as possible. It is perfectly valid to not remember their name during the first week, and this is one of the few times in your life it will be socially acceptable to ask everyone to remind you of their name 3 times in a row. But even if you can’t remember their name, you’ll recognize their face and feel more comfortable approaching them if you see them around campus.
  10. Find something that you’re passionate about and join a club or organization. I always tell my freshmen residents, as well as any incoming freshman I take on a tour to find at least two things they’re extremely passionate about. Find something within your college, like a professional society for your major, but also find something else. Whether that’s an intramural team or a hobby club (my favorites on our campus are the Lumberjack Club and the Cat Club), find what makes you happy and can give you a break from all of your classes. Now, keep i mind that you can join more than two clubs or organizations, but practice some moderation here. You don’t want to overextend yourself. You’re still trying to figure out where the nearest bathroom is from all your classes, you don’t need to try to conquer campus.
  11. Befriend an upperclassman. Preferably one in your major, but any will work just fine. What you’re looking for here is someone you feel comfortable asking weird questions to, like “SOS, I’m so lost where do I go from here,” or “Wait, which building was it where I can’t take the front stairs?” Also, they’ll usually have material from whatever classes you’re taking that they will be willing to pass on to you.
  12. Don’t put stuff off. It may not seem like a lot, but it definitely piles up. This applies to homework, joining that club, talking to that cute kid in your class, or confronting someone about that thing that upset you. Just shut up and do it.
  13. The only people you should worry about impressing are your parents and yourself. Make them proud, and make yourself proud, and you will have accomplished everything you should have set out to do during your time in college. Your GPA does not define you. It’s just a number.
  14. If the people you meet at orientation don’t become your BFFs, it’s not the end of the world. You have so much time ahead of you to meet the people that will stay in your life for years to come, so don’t stress about meeting them now.
  15. Be aware of those around you. For most of you, this will be your first time sharing a bedroom with another human, so be aware that they have lives and feelings, too. No one needs to hear you fornicating at 3 am. Also think about the other people in classes with you. Be respectful of not only your time, but the time of those around you as well. 
  16. Learn how to bake awesome cookies. Everyone will love you. Note: any baked goods will suffice.
  17. Call home every now and then. Your family wants to hear from you and make sure you’re still alive and feeding yourself properly, so check in every now and then.
  18. DO NOT go home your first two weeks of college. You’ll be homesick, and that’s normal and expected, but I promise you that it will only be worse if you give in and go home. Besides, you’ll miss out on all sorts of opportunities to meet new people and get plugged in on campus.
  19. You might fail your first exam and that is just fine. I literally got a 22% on the first exam I ever took in college, and they’ve let me stick around for 3 whole years. College is different than high school, and the grades may be lower than you’ve been used to. Just power through and keep working hard and everything will be just fine.
  20. Ask for help if you need it. I don’t care what kind of help you need, but you can’t get it unless you ask for it. Whether it’s in your personal life or class, there is a human who exists for the sole purpose of helping you through anything you’ve got going on, so call your mom, approach your RA, go to your professor’s office hours. The resources are there, you just need to know where to look for them. 

Now that you’ve read this, get off Tumblr and go introduce yourself to someone new (unless you aren’t on campus yet, in which case, keep doing what you’re doing).

Alrighty, that’s all I’ve got for now. Good luck to all of you, you’re going to rock the socks of your freshman year. Let me know how it goes!

My wee little brother is finally going to be a freshman in college (I’m so proud :’)) and was asking me for advice the other day. It occurred to me that most of the advice I heard going into uni was stuff like “you can’t live on ramen” and “don’t strangle your roommate in their sleep.”

Solid, but also fairly common sense. I felt that most “college guides” didn’t address the real challenges I ended up facing with school and academia my freshman year, and there was other important but overlooked advice one should keep in mind. So I wrote this for him, and might as well publish it here, as a guide to any incoming freshman on The Real Things You Need To Know For College.

- Go. To Fucking. Office Hours. Especially if you’re writing a paper. Be not afraid of professors, they are nerds who want to talk this one really specific thing they’ve been working on for a decade and want to help you. I used to be afraid of office hours but now I practically live in them, ending up in some office or another talking about research projects and readings at least twice a week. Most professors love engaged & interested undergrads, and will talk you to your grave if you let them. I’ve never regretted an office hour visit.

- If you plan to go to grad school, get involved in research early and stay involved. This is easier than you think - keep an eye out for opportunities and take chances on applying to things - and GO. TO. OFFICE. HOURS. Ask profs if they know any projects you can be involved in. Ask your advisor. Ask your T.A. Let people know you’re interested.

- If you’re not going to grad school, *get an internship.* Make sure you get course credit for it if it’s not paid. Unpaid internships suck esp on top of school and jobs, but they make a huge difference when it comes to experience, your resumé, and figuring out what you want to do.

- Sometimes college is going to suck. Sometimes it’s going to be 3am and you’re at the library too broke to afford coffee, considering sleeping on the chair. Sometimes you’ll be taking 18 hours, working two jobs, and running an organization and can’t remember the last time you called your mama. Those are the most important moments of college, if you ask me. They test if you really want to be doing what you’re doing, if you’re willing to push yourself to the brink for it, or are just doing it bc it’ll make you money or your parents said so.

- If you don’t want to be doing what you’re doing, it’s okay. Talk to people about it. Reach out to professors, classmates, people in your major, and counseling and career services. People want to help you, whether you’re changing paths or turning down a side road, and their guidance will be a blessing in a troubled time.

- Don’t skip class. Just don’t. Go to even the most boring, read-off-slide-doesn’t-take-attendance class. Don’t let people tell you skipping your whole semester’s worth of classes is normal, because it’s not. You’re paying for these courses. I have anxiety, I know what it’s like to be so paralyzed you can’t even get out of bed, but make yourself at least show up, even if you’re in sweatpants-sweatshirt-no-bra spending the whole class writing on your computer. At least you’re there.
Skipping one “mental health break” class isn’t terrible but it’s a slippery slope that I’ve seen more people fall down than not. Do what’s healthy for you, and talk to student counseling if you really are having trouble wanting to go to class, but try your very best to attend every single one.

- And beyond all this, the biggest advice I could give is to have a life outside of college. If you’re taking 15+ hours and working in labs or on campus, your whole life becomes the university. It can quickly start to get overwhelming, like you can’t escape. Do something for yourself - I knit and listen to audiobooks or podcasts for at least four hours a week, as well as blog, and honestly that’s what keeps me sane. Take up ice skating at the local rink every week or plan dinner and movie dates with friends. Join a church group or start crafting or fishing or something equally quirky. Give yourself something that’s not school (and not drinking/partying) to look forward to, and it’ll make all the difference in the world.

To the upcoming freshman babies:

1. Dress comfy. Not everyday has to be “dress to impress day.” Frankly, more people are gonna be focusing on cramming studying in before the next class to really notice.

2. Wear comfy shoes. Most likely you’ll have a short passing period and you really don’t want to be late to class.

3. Some teachers are okay with being alittle late if you explain your situation, but some teachers are demons from the netherworld so just be careful and see what teachers are which during the “new year” buff time.

4. DONT SKIP. Honestly, where would you go? What would you do? And there are cameras and adminstration everywhere, do not take the risk. Just go to class. You’d be occupied at least.

5. Be polite to the lunchladies, more than not they’ll let you slide if you don’t have enough lunch money for lunch.

6. Always carry change for lunch/snacks for vending machines. ( About 3$ is fine. )

7. Study.

8. STUDY.

9. S T U D Y. Even the day before is fine, just do it at least once.

10. Sleep. Don’t stay up all night on an assignment. You can always finish it in the morning, during free time in other classes, on the bus, in the car, etc., etc., etc.

11. COMMUNICATE. Talk to your teachers if something in class isn’t working out, I.e, getting to class on time, getting to ANOTHER class on time that’s after that particular one, needing an extra period/lunch/few hours to finish an assignment/ homework. TRUST ME, they aren’t like last years 8th grade teachers. They actually listen.
Yes, even the mean ones.

12. You don’t have to make friends the first month.

13. You don’t have to make friends the first 2 months.

14. You can ask to work solo, if you explain the teachers will most likely let you.

15. DON’T FORGET YOUR CHARGER.

16. DONT FORGET YOUR HEADPHONES!

17. Lunch isn’t as scary as you think. If you get to school earlier and know where lunch gets held at, scope out the land and see what looks good for you.

18. Alot of the upper classmen understand, you can talk to them anytime for advice, where to go, such and such.

19. Hygiene. Carry deodorant, perfume, lotion, gum, breath mints, whatever.
Just carry it.
Please.
ESPECIALLY, if you have p.e.

20. Hydrate.

21. DONT FORGET YOUR KEYS!

22. PENCILS.PENCILS.PENS.PENS.PENCILS.

22. ERASERS.WHITEOUT.ERASERS.

23. Stay away from the guys with beards and mustaches/gotees.

24.
YOU
DONT
HAVE
TO
PARTICIPATE
IN CLUBS/
ACTIVITIES/
EVENTS
IF YOU DONT WANT TO.

25. Overall, just be careful. Adapt. The teachers are right, you’re not in middle school anymore.

i keep seeing this post going around that is directed at incoming college freshman and it seems kind of like?? really negative so here you go:

1. the freshman fifteen is a real thing, it is true, but it is preventable. most of the freshman fifteen comes from drinking ridiculous amounts if alcohol and then eating crappy food. if you drink responsibly (most of the time) and eat like you normally would at home youre all set

2. there is always pizza in the dining hall. dont eat pizza all the time.

3. if youre going to take a nap just set an alarm before class, then you wont have to run. naps are nice and you deserve them.

4. a lot of classes offer cool one credit classes that involve going to the gym. these are really cool and help motivate you to get out and exercise.

5. the homework level is manageable as long as you stay on top of it. most classes dont meet every day so if youre not feeling doing homework right after the class ends you can do it the next day and still have time.


6. just dont let it all pile up

7. finals arent that bad if youre not cramming. just study the week before in small increments.

8. sometimes your roommates do things you dont like. talk to them about it, dont be passive aggressive. it solves nothing

9. college can be really hard and scary at first but it gets so much better. just remember that everybody is as nervous as you are and dont be afraid to approach new people.

10. a grade does not define you. sometimes you work your ass off and fail. you can get back from this. you are not and never will be a failure because youre struggling. 11. professors are friends and office hours are best friends.

it is so worth it guys. i had a hard time first semester (i called my mom crying like every weekend for a month) but you settle in and get in the swing it things and it DOES get better.
second semester is here and im having the time of my life

good luck ❤❤