french-letter

I like that young naive America thinks if he gets kissed even on the cheeks that it automatically means he’s married.


There was no bigger fanboy for America and their fight for Indecpanence than Marquis de Lafayette. While on the road to meet the continental congress he would write letters to his wife on how wonderful everything in America was the landscapes, food, spirit, people, the women (Yah he gushed about how American women were the most beautiful he had ever seen to his wife lol)  While he was recovering for his leg wound he basically just wrote letters to French elites singing America’s praises.

French letters pronunciation

A : aah
B : beh
C : seh
D : deh
E : euh
F : eff
G : jay
H : ashs
I : ee
J : zhee
K : kah
L : ell
M : em
N : en
O : oh
P : peh
Q : koo
R : air
S : ess
T : teh
U : ooh
V : veh
W : doo-bluh-vay
X : eeks
Y : ee-grek
Z : zed

i didn’t know how to wrote it in english for the pronunciation if u know what i mean :) hope it’s right

How to pronounce certain french letters:

a, à, â - like a in father 

au - like o in over

c - before a, o, and u, like k in kite
     before e and i, like s in sun

ç - like s in sun

cc - like cc in accident

ch - like sh in ship

e, eu - like u in puff

è, ê, e - like e in fetch

e, ez, er - like ay in play

g - before a, o, and u, like g in get
     before e, i, and y, like s in leisure

h - silent

i - like ee in feet

j - like s in leisure 

o - like o in toll

oi - like wa in wag

ou - like oo in shoot

qu - like k in kite 

r - rolled at the back of the throat

u - like ew in dew

ui - like wee in between

w - like v in van

anonymous asked:

Ok so imagine in the spn world there's a "french men of letters" any headcanons as a french xD ?

Hi anon ^^

I LOVE YOUR QUESTION!! OMG, I’m gonna have so much fin with this one xD Ok, let’s go!

1) Richelieu founded the French Men of Letters in 1635, the same year as the Académie Française (French Academy). They were the biggest and best well kept secret of the French kingdom, then of the French Republic. They work on their own, have “carte blanche” but secretly receive money from the French government because they are useful to the nation. They never appear on any register though.

2) Working during the French Revolution was a pain in the ass but things got better with Napoleon who gave The Men of Letters an unlimited funding after his troops were attacked by a bunch of demons in 1804.

3) Gustave Eiffel was a Man of Letters and so were the Chevalier d’Eon, Marie Curie (poor Pierre never knew about his wife’s activities), Madame Yvonne de Gaulle (wife of General de Gaulle) even if they all denied these allegations.

4) The top of the Eiffel Tower (built by Gustave Eiffel, what a coincidence…) is an observation post that is used by the MOL to spot any suspect/paranormal activity happening in the French capital city. The top of Notre-Dame de la Garde, a famous church in Marseille, is also an observation spot.

5) Rumors says that The MOL’s HQ is located in an abandoned subway station on Line 10 of the Paris subway, Mabillon, or in the complex network of underground tunnels right below the Paris Opéra.

6) The Phantom of the Opera wasn’t a legend. The French Men of Letters helped hunters to catch him in 1881. Gaston Leroux, the son of a hunter, wrote the whole story in 1910, inspired by the stories told by his dad.

7) Only a few members of the organization know about the location of a gate of hell, somewhere on the French territory. In 1999, the gate of hell was almost opened but the MOL prevented the worse. The brief opening “only” caused a series of cyclones over the country.

8) The Cafés are the biggest information network of the French Men of Letters. They are their eyes and ears and the French “garçons” are the best informants you could hope for. The Cafés being replaced by Starbucks coffees and hipsters bars are currently a big problem.

9) The French MOL stopped the big vampire invasion of 1992. You’ve never heard about it? It’s normal, it’s because they stopped it, silly.

10) The Parisians Men of Letters are hated by the rest of the French Men of Letters because the Paris Division is just a bunch of “pretentious assholes” but the Paris Division doesn’t care because they despise the other Men of Letters anyway. They are better than the others and they know it. Please. The rivalry was temporarily set aside during the previously mentioned 1992 vampire invasion because they had to collaborate on this big problem.

11) At 12:00, everybody stops their work/hunt/whatever because it’s lunch. We are not savages.

12) The Parisian MOL are often late to MOL meetings because the local trains are always late and because the traffic on the Périphérique (a belt highway around Paris) is just terrible.

13) The MOL are on strike at least twice a year because “we can’t work in these conditions!! I mean, look at the Brits and all the stuff they have!! It’s an absolute scandal!!”. These strikes granted, among other things, a new Nespresso coffee machine, a high speed internet connection in MOL’s bunkers around the country, two weeks of paid vacations, a grenade launcher per employee and new silver bullets.

14) In July 2006, the French MOL briefly stopped their diplomatic relations with the Italian Men of Letters after the World Cup Finale because of the Zidane/Materazzi incident . It was Materazzi’s fault anyway, a position that wasn’t shared by the Italian branch, hence a brief cold in the relation that was put to an end in early August of the same year when a bunch of demons were causing troubles at the French-Italian border.

15) The vault of the French Men of Letters contains object such as a possessed apple, the one that terrified Annecy in 1585, the armor of Joan of Arc, a letter by Victor Hugo to a newspaper revealing the existence of the Men of letters and that was intercepted just in time (nice try Vic), the body of a Korrigan and of the Beast of Gévaudan, a gun by Casimir Lefaucheux, french gunsmith, that has the same property as The Colt (unfortunately, there is no more bullet left). Not to forget the body of the shape shifter that briefly replaced Marie-Antoinette in 1782.

16) They heard about the Winchesters but thank fuck, the elder one is afraid of flying and will never come to France. The last thing the MOL needs are these guys in the streets of Paris or Lyon (we have enough problems, thank you very much). There’s no space to park the Impala anyway.

I think we are gonna stop there! Thanks again xD

Hi! I’m Ori, and this is my (new) studyblr. I’m a sixteen-year-old boy from the USA and I’m currently preparing for the ACT and the SAT Subject Tests. My favorite subjects are French, math, and science. I love medicine and want to be a pediatric surgeon one day. I also like lettering (as shown above) and design. I’ll be posting a combination of all that stuff! 

youtube

J-Walk - French Letter

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C’était la Guerre des Tranchées / It Was the War of the Trenches (1993) is a French ‘comic’ book written and illustrated by Jacques Tardi and dedicated to his grandfather who fought ‘in the trenches’ (a French euphemism to talk about the First World War).
The book is an accurate depiction of the life on both sides of the Western Front, recounted through a multitude of mainly French soldiers’ letters, and is well known for its graphic representation of WW1.

“They’re shooting men… This is normal, because it’s the war of the trenches which has been going on for three years now…
…the most surprising is that there are still traces of life left in these holes, with all so many shells they’re dropping on so little ground.

Those men have dug trenches, made shelters in the earth and learned to live in the mud like rats. These ones are French.
Facing them, it’s the same thing, but the trenches are better organized because they are German. The French say ‘les Boches’ when talking about their enemies, out of contempt, hatred, or perhaps stupidity, because this is indeed what this is about about when one is talking about war.”

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18.12.16 [bujo post again haha] Xmas soon'🎄 Planning to do a christmas playlist but not sure 🤔 & If you don’t have any idea of what gifts you want to offer or just want to buy some cute stationery with affordable prices you can use the code “ KIIMBAPNOTES ” to get 10% off at kawaiipenshop.com + the international shipping is free!😊 & the washi on their website omg😍

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“In the spring of 1915, some months after Russia’s declaration of war against Turkey, a band of twelfth-century Crusaders, covered from head to foot in rusty chain armour and carrying shields and broad-swords came riding on horseback down the main avenue of Tiflis [Tbilisi]. People’s eyes almost popped out of their heads. Obviously this was no cinema company going on location. These were Crusaders – or their ghosts.“

The incredible troop clanked up to the governor’s palace. ‘Where’s the war?’ They asked. ‘We hear there’s a war’.

They had heard in April 1915 that there was a war. It had been declared in September 1914. The news took seven months to reach the last of the Crusaders.

The warriors were Khevsurs from the historical Khevsureti region (Georgian: ხევსურეთი) of north east Georgia. Legend tells that they are descended from Crusaders who left France 800 years ago and became detached from the main army, marched through Turkey and Armenia and settled in the Greater Caucasus mountains in Georgia.

Though the legend is not supported by some historians it is curious that Khevsur chain armor is in the french style and the letters A.M.D. – Ave Mater Dei, the motto of the Crusaders – is carved on their shields, and Crusader crosses adorn the handles of their broadswords and are embroidered on their garments.

The pure European origin of Khevsurs is not supported by most modern scholars. However, Crusaders are mentioned in several manuscripts of the time as participants of several battles against the Muslims in Georgia (100 “Frankish” Crusaders participated in King David’s army in the Battle of Didgori), and some did pass through Georgia after the fall of the Holy Land.

The origin of the Khevsurs remains one of the most curious legends of the Caucasus and it is perhaps more romantic to believe that the warriors who rode in full armor down the main avenue in Tbilisi in 1915 really were the ‘last of the crusaders’.”

From Richard Halliburton’s “Seven League Boots”, 1935