french revolution 1830

Miserable Lester, Part zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Heeeeeyyyyy, Lia!

Lia! You goddamn millennial slouch! Stop dicking around on your phone and listen up! You’re supposed to be recapping the next chapter of Les Mis!

Aw, Lia, that’s a bunch of boring historico-political junk. You know I’m not interested in that stuff. I thought I’d just jokingly Not Really Recap It At All the way I did with the Waterloo section!

You know, it might be more interesting to you if you bothered reading a couple of Wikipedia articles to give you an actual context. And I suspect having a rudimentary understanding of the political crap involved is going to help you appreciate the next part of the story more. It’s not just prison, personal tragedies, and guiltllucinations anymore, babe! They have like an entire fucking failed revolution or whatever.

Screw you!

Dude, I’m saving you time and effort! It’s a hell of a lot easier to explain something in a funny way when you know at least a little bit about it.

…So you think I should, what, just…read, then Wikipedia this shit until I think I have a handle on what I just read and my eyes aren’t skating over half the text like it’s a roller rink, then try and give a quick rundown?

Pretty much.

Can I at least do it section by section? In small, manageable chunks, you know. Like, one post per Roman Numeral Entry Of VHugz Political Bloviating?

Sure. It’s your blog.

Okaaaaaaaaay.

Fiiiiiiiiine.

Great! Let’s get to it, shall we?

Keep reading

Eugène Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, 28th July 1830, 1830, oil on canvas, 260 × 325 cm, Musée du Louvre, Paris. Source

A female personification of Liberty stands above a mass of fallen bodies after the French Revolution of 1830, which saw Charles X overthrown and replaced by his cousin Louis Philippe I. Delacroix’s passionate painting was exhibited at the 1831 Paris Salon before being returned to the artist in 1832. The government feared Liberty Leading the People would incite further populist rebellion if put on permanent public display, and so the painting did not enter the Louvre collection until 1874.